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QF A380 SIN-SYD Engine Failure - Part 6  
User currently offlinemoderators From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 505 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 39110 times:
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This is a continuation thread from part 5, which can be found here: QF A380 SIN-SYD Engine Failure - Part 5

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250 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBlueShamu330s From UK - England, joined Sep 2001, 2777 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 39092 times:

Not sure if this was mentioned towards the end of part 6, but just to put to bed any speculation as to whether the frame will be repaired or written off:

As regards the damaged Nancy Bird Walton, it was repairable and would be returned to service, though timing of its return was in the "medium term", Mr Joyce said.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/trav...eturn-to-skies-20101123-184pp.html

Rgds



So I drive a 4x4. So what?! Tax the a$$ off me for it...oh, you already have... :-(
User currently offlineCHRISBA777ER From UK - England, joined Mar 2001, 5964 posts, RR: 62
Reply 2, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 38986 times:

Quoting BlueShamu330s (Reply 1):
Not sure if this was mentioned towards the end of part 6, but just to put to bed any speculation as to whether the frame will be repaired or written off:

As regards the damaged Nancy Bird Walton, it was repairable and would be returned to service, though timing of its return was in the "medium term", Mr Joyce said.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/trav...eturn-to-skies-20101123-184pp.html

Rgds

Great news!



What do you mean you dont have any bourbon? Do you know how far it is to Houston? What kind of airline is this???
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 3, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 38884 times:

Some more info. on the A380's return to Qantas service:-

"Following action to replace the aircraft's Rolls-Royce engines, the airline will ferry the first of its A380s from Los Angeles, where it has been grounded, to Sydney, to commence flying passengers from Sydney to London via Singapore on Saturday, November 27, as flight QF31.

"A second grounded A380 is expected be ferried from Los Angeles to Sydney by week's end, in readiness to fly passengers.

"For now, the aircraft will only operate to the United Kingdom, said Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce.

"With two new Airbus A380s soon to be delivered to the airline, Qantas expects to have four of the double-decker flying giants in the sky for the busy Christmas period."


http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/trav...eturn-to-skies-20101123-184pp.html

Also an indication that QF is not out of the wood yet. This bit of the story puts me in mind of the days when I used to fly the 'extreme range' (8,000nm.) MEL-LAX route quite frequently in 747s. From Melbourne, anyway, you had pretty good prospects of an empty seat next to you - depending on the winds, they often used to have to 'under-load' the 747 by anything up to thirty passengers. Be a pity if 'history repeats itself' with the A380.

"The airline has imposed thrust limitations on the aircraft's troubled Trent 900 engines, so as to keep them well within safe operating parameters. This means that they won't be operating on the Los Angeles route in the immediate future.

"In line with its conservative approach to operational safety, Qantas is voluntarily suspending A380 services on routes that regularly require use of maximum certified engine thrust, and will do so until further operational experience is gained or possible additional changes are made to engines," the airline said."


[Edited 2010-11-23 05:36:33]


"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineGRIVely From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 139 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 38610 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 3):
"The airline has imposed thrust limitations on the aircraft's troubled Trent 900 engines, so as to keep them well within safe operating parameters. This means that they won't be operating on the Los Angeles route in the immediate future.

This is an unfortunate turn of phrase, even though accurate and good engineering practice, since it will reinforce the idea in the public's mind that Qantas was previously operating their engines "outside of safe operating parameters." Lawyers for the many persons lined up to file claims against the airline for suffering traumatic stress during the incident will jump on that as the next thing to reckless endangerment.


User currently offlinePanman From Trinidad and Tobago, joined Aug 1999, 790 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 37911 times:

OQF ferried yesterday.
OQE is currently en route to Sydney.

That leaves OQD (LAX) and OQB (FRA - C check completed) as the only 2 airworthy QF A380s that are not on home soil.

PanmaN


User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21353 posts, RR: 54
Reply 6, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 37600 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 3):
Also an indication that QF is not out of the wood yet. This bit of the story puts me in mind of the days when I used to fly the 'extreme range' (8,000nm.) MEL-LAX route quite frequently in 747s. From Melbourne, anyway, you had pretty good prospects of an empty seat next to you - depending on the winds, they often used to have to 'under-load' the 747 by anything up to thirty passengers. Be a pity if 'history repeats itself' with the A380.

Well, at least it looks like Rolls Royce would have to buy the tickets for such empty seats...!   


User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 11915 posts, RR: 25
Reply 7, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 37343 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 3):
Also an indication that QF is not out of the wood yet.

I'm pretty confused about the current state of affairs.

QF has rejoined SQ and LH in flying the A380, which makes sense to me.

But we have heard that the engine explosion has raised issues as to whether or not the A380 redundant systems performed as designed.

But one can presume due to a lack of regulatory action that no facts have turned up so far to clearly implicate the A380 systems, no?

Thus the fact that all carriers have the A380 back in service.

So I guess this will be the status quo till the ATSB report comes out, which may or may not point out any flaws in the A380 systems?



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlinegemuser From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 5551 posts, RR: 6
Reply 8, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 36942 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 7):
Thus the fact that all carriers have the A380 back in service

Another relevant fact is QF is NOT operating the Trent900 @ 72K thrust rating, yet. Hence A380 service will be limited to SIN/LHR for the time being. This suggests that QF, at least, is still suspicious of the higher thrust rating.

Gemuser



DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
User currently offlinekanban From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 3205 posts, RR: 25
Reply 9, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 36679 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting gemuser (Reply 8):
Another relevant fact is QF is NOT operating the Trent900 @ 72K thrust rating, yet. Hence A380 service will be limited to SIN/LHR for the time being. This suggests that QF, at least, is still suspicious of the higher thrust rating.


probably just being cautious plus Rolls may have suggested the throttle back while they do more research


User currently offlinefridgmus From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 1439 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 36421 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Hey, they can always switch to Engine Alliance engines!!!   


The Lockheed Super Constellation, the REAL Queen of the Skies!
User currently offlinethegeek From Australia, joined Nov 2007, 2638 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 36384 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 7):
But we have heard that the engine explosion has raised issues as to whether or not the A380 redundant systems performed as designed.

This is something which wasn't addressed by the Airbus statement. Allegedly, the Green Hydraulic system was non-functional, but not confirmed/denied. But there should be at least an electrical system fail AIUI before any ailerons start not working, which Airbus has confirmed: 3/6.


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16908 posts, RR: 67
Reply 12, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 36216 times:

Quoting fridgmus (Reply 10):
Hey, they can always switch to Engine Alliance engines!!!

Yes I did notice the smiley. Anyway there are several reasons why not:
- Re-engining to a different model is not a trivial undertaking.
- There are probably no delivery slots free.
- Airlines and engine manufacturers have contracts that cost a lot of money to get out of.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineBoeing767-300 From Australia, joined Sep 2001, 659 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 36135 times:

Quoting kanban (Reply 9):
Quoting gemuser (Reply 8):
Another relevant fact is QF is NOT operating the Trent900 @ 72K thrust rating, yet. Hence A380 service will be limited to SIN/LHR for the time being. This suggests that QF, at least, is still suspicious of the higher thrust rating.


probably just being cautious plus Rolls may have suggested the throttle back while they do more research

I remember the 1st A380 had an engine changeout before its inugural flight to Singapore and Sydney. That rung alarm bells then.

What I find difficult to understand is 70-72K is well and truly tried and tested territory. The Trent 900 being a new design surely there is room for thrust increase well above 72 but there seem to be issues at 70K.

Don't get me wrong RR make fine engines but the A380 and A345/6 Rollers are not amongst them. Rolls prepare for litigation this will cost you billions......


User currently offlinetepidhalibut From Iceland, joined Dec 2004, 209 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 35964 times:

Quoting Boeing767-300 (Reply 13):
The Trent 900 being a new design surely there is room for thrust increase well above 72

The ETCDS confirms that there's a 980 rating, so the engines design would have been tested to those thrusts. I believe that the only difference between the various mark numbers is a setting in the EEC.


User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 11915 posts, RR: 25
Reply 15, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 35334 times:

Quoting thegeek (Reply 11):
Joined exactly 3 years ago today!

Happy a.net birthday, thegeek!

Quoting thegeek (Reply 11):
Quoting Revelation (Reply 7):
But we have heard that the engine explosion has raised issues as to whether or not the A380 redundant systems performed as designed.

This is something which wasn't addressed by the Airbus statement.

Indeed. So my confusion is that either:

A) Airbus has addressed it to the satisfaction of the authorities, or

B) The entire issue is still under review.

Two very different states of affairs, at least in my mind.

As above, I suspect (B) is true, and Airbus and the authorities will come up with some mods in the near future, but for now, the planes fly under the original certification.

Quoting thegeek (Reply 11):
Allegedly, the Green Hydraulic system was non-functional, but not confirmed/denied. But there should be at least an electrical system fail AIUI before any ailerons start not working, which Airbus has confirmed: 3/6.

Interesting. Now that Boeing has admitted their power management software needs some improvement, I wonder if Airbus will do the same? Or are they going to keep mum and let RR take the rap for now.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21353 posts, RR: 54
Reply 16, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 35041 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 15):
Interesting. Now that Boeing has admitted their power management software needs some improvement, I wonder if Airbus will do the same? Or are they going to keep mum and let RR take the rap for now.

The decisive issue is not the extent of the damage on its own, but the question whether the plane operated as planned given the nature of the engine failure. And I don't think we on the outside can really make that call yet.


User currently offlineBOEING747400 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 319 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 35045 times:

The RR powered A380s have been delimited down to 70K thrust ratings until the problem has been fixed.

Are the EA powered A380s also at 70K thrust or not? More or less powerful?

I think that if the RR engines are indeed faulty, then all A380s should switch to EA power plants; but if RR can modify their Trent 900s to the highest safety standards, then I see no problem with the A380s sticking to the current RR engines with the modifications in place.


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16908 posts, RR: 67
Reply 18, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 34730 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 15):

A) Airbus has addressed it to the satisfaction of the authorities, or

B) The entire issue is still under review.

Two very different states of affairs, at least in my mind.

As above, I suspect (B) is true, and Airbus and the authorities will come up with some mods in the near future, but for now, the planes fly under the original certification.

As I see it, the plane was certified as built (obviously). The incident does not suddenly make it a deathtrap. However, new data gleaned from the incident should be used to review the design and the certification requirements.

Incidents and accidents very frequently lead to recommendations or mandates about improvements. That's one of the ways the airline industry continues to improve safety.

Quoting BOEING747400 (Reply 17):
I think that if the RR engines are indeed faulty, then all A380s should switch to EA power plants; but if RR can modify their Trent 900s to the highest safety standards, then I see no problem with the A380s sticking to the current RR engines with the modifications in place.

It is really not that simple to switch. Big big job costing a lot of money. I would bet that it is way easier and cheaper to modify the RR engines to solve the problem.

Also, airlines can't simply walk away from RR. There are contracts in place.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlinerottenray From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 273 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 34490 times:

Quoting Starlionblue (Reply 18):
Also, airlines can't simply walk away from RR. There are contracts in place.


Nor should they.

RR is a world-class engine supplier.

They may need to fix some things with the 900 and possibly the 1000, but they're not evading the issue.

That's the best you can hope for.

We should concentrate on the science behind the disc failing, and try to understand that.



Cheers!


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16908 posts, RR: 67
Reply 20, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 34328 times:

Well said rottenray. Unlike in the movies, companies are better served by doing the (boring) thing and working together to solve the problem instead of yelling at each other. The latter is a much more costly alternative and both parties typically know it.

As my old boss used to say: "A good deal is one where both parties are satisfied". (Yes I'm sure he stole it.)



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlinethegeek From Australia, joined Nov 2007, 2638 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 34291 times:

Starlionblue, it may work that way in aviation, but I respectfully suggest that many business relationships (like in the software industry) have a large element of screwing the other party.

People that you want to continue to work with in the future are where the most co-operation is present.


User currently offlineozglobal From France, joined Nov 2004, 2701 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 34188 times:

Ahhhgg, my QF32 A388 flight LHR-SYD on 8th Dec which I book in order to try the new A380 F class has just been changed to a 744. Thought they might have the aircraft by then to cover QF31/32....

[Edited 2010-11-26 00:14:43]


When all's said and done, there'll be more said than done.
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16908 posts, RR: 67
Reply 23, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 34125 times:

Quoting thegeek (Reply 21):
Starlionblue, it may work that way in aviation, but I respectfully suggest that many business relationships (like in the software industry) have a large element of screwing the other party.

People that you want to continue to work with in the future are where the most co-operation is present.

Fair point. But even in the software industry a lot of the lawyering is posturing.

I guess in the aviation industry when you only have 2-3 choices on airframes and engines it pays to be on good terms.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6094 posts, RR: 9
Reply 24, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 33349 times:

So, it took me several hours over two days to read part 4 and 5 that I had skipped while focusing on the 787 incident and other interests. I haven't read all the linked material yet so it's possible I missed a few things.

As someone asked, it was me that said the wing angle was changed after a few A380 were produced. It was not a screw-up, the first planes are performing fine. I had some trouble finding references for this to prove what I said. There was this, dated from 17/05/2009 : http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/gener...0Sought%20by%20Airbus&channel=awst

Quote:
For instance, although Airbus likes to tout the efficiency of the A380's wing, Tom Williams, executive vice president for programs, says the wing's twist may be changed slightly to garner tiny fuel-burn improvements.

It's likely I got the information at around that time, but in another article I can't find. That was then an idea, not implemented like I thought it was.

One year and one day later, 18/05/2010, we have this article : http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...ilding-new-higher-weight-a380.html

Quote:
This new A380 build standard will be introduced later this year when assembly begins of the first wings at Airbus's Broughton, UK plant, and these will also incorporate a 1.5° increase in twist to further optimise aerodynamics as part of the improvement package. Airbus says that the upgrade does not require any thrust bumps, and is not capable of retrofit to earlier build aircraft.

BA is due to be the launch operator for the improved A380, when its first Rolls-Royce Trent 900-powered aircraft is delivered in 2013. Airbus executives previously disclosed that the weight and performance gain came from a requirement for a couple of customers during sales campaigns against the Boeing 747-8I.

So, all currently assembled A380s should have the same wing after all, however the UK plant making them is changing the twist of the wing right now, or maybe it's done already. It is surely possible to know if they have started building BA's first A380 wing, I can't search now.

Quoting BlueShamu330s (Reply 1):
Not sure if this was mentioned towards the end of part 6, but just to put to bed any speculation as to whether the frame will be repaired or written off:

As regards the damaged Nancy Bird Walton, it was repairable and would be returned to service, though timing of its return was in the "medium term", Mr Joyce said.

Very good news !

Quoting Panman (Reply 5):
OQF ferried yesterday.
OQE is currently en route to Sydney.

That leaves OQD (LAX) and OQB (FRA - C check completed) as the only 2 airworthy QF A380s that are not on home soil.

Might I suggest that if they're not back yet, it's because they're not airworthy ?

Quoting thegeek (Reply 11):
This is something which wasn't addressed by the Airbus statement. Allegedly, the Green Hydraulic system was non-functional, but not confirmed/denied. But there should be at least an electrical system fail AIUI before any ailerons start not working, which Airbus has confirmed: 3/6.

What do you call an aileron, and where did you read 3 out of 6 were not working ? Clearly some spoilerons (spoilers+ailerons) were not working. There are 12 of those. About the "ailerons" (they also act as spoilers, AND flaps), I didn't read anything about them not working. There are 3 on each end of the wings, so 3 out of 6 not working seems a strange number (but not impossible if linked to damage to some control wires). The outer ones are powered by green and yellow, the other 4 by green for a pair, yellow for the other. Electrical backup for all with different busses. So even if you lose the green circuit and somehow some or all electrical backups, you'd still have 4 of them.

Quoting BOEING747400 (Reply 17):
The RR powered A380s have been delimited down to 70K thrust ratings until the problem has been fixed.

Are the EA powered A380s also at 70K thrust or not? More or less powerful?

The currently available (or asked for) GP7200 engine is the GP7270 with 70Klbs. In fact only Qantas needs 72Klbs, the other RR Trent 900 operators have the 70Klbs rating of that engine.



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
25 AJ : VH-OQF is now enroute to Singapore as QFA0031. Alan Joyce and the flight's Captain were covered as the lead item in the main news bulletins. Airbus to
26 Post contains links and images cpd : It got underway in gusty conditions.
27 Post contains images Aesma : tdscanuck, in the previous thread you said this : There is a problem with your 8m number between inboard and outboard engines. I'm thinking they're 8m
28 ltbewr : At least QF is finding the best way to deal with a difficult situation. The big problem is reduced capacity they will have for the foreseeable future
29 Panman : Don't confuse "airworthy" with "fit for flight". PanmaN
30 Rendezvous : . The increased thrust is needed for high weight takeoffs and climbs, not for the cruise portion of the flight.
31 Post contains images kiwiandrew : OK , I am prepared to get flamed here because I am not the most technically minded person , but one thing I have seen mentioned a few times over the c
32 Post contains links dynamicsguy : Yes. The A380 has additional electrical backups for flight controls which I understand work as a local hydraulic supply which is used instead of anot
33 Post contains images kiwiandrew : Thanks for the quick response dynamicsguy very interesting diagrams , and some very useful comments posted in response as well ... it makes a lot mor
34 Klaus : On the face of it, your reasoning is indeed correct. But the A380 does indeed use (at least) triple redundancy on that level after all: Instead of th
35 Post contains images kiwiandrew : Thanks Klaus , I figured that there had to be some explanation , I just wasn't sure whether I would be able to cope with it without my head exploding
36 Post contains images Klaus : Glad to help. The schematics linked to by dynamicsguy really show it well. I just wasn't as quick in my reaction.
37 Post contains links thegeek : I didn't know that the spoilers were spoilerons, or that the A380 was equipped with flaperons. In answer to your question on source, here: http://blo
38 Zkpilot : The primary reason why QF has higher thrust engines& why LAX ops are currently suspended is because at LAX the A380 needs to use the shorter runw
39 sunrisevalley : For what reason?
40 Aesma : Is that productive ? Better to play it low I would think. Well, the engines are broken, so I don't see the difference. Taxiways not certified to go t
41 rottenray : I saw a scan of the ad, and I have to give Airbus credit for supporting their product as well as the airlines who bought the product. It harkened bac
42 AusA380 : Remember that as I understand it QF is the only airline that has the 747-400ER which is specifically used on the AUS-USA route, probably for the same
43 thegeek : QF only NEED the 744ER on MEL-LAX. On SYD-LAX, it is a nice to have, and boosts the amount of cargo which can be carried. Perhaps there are some unfav
44 jfk777 : WHY would the long runway not be available ? Since when does LAX not have LONG A380 runways ? From what I have seen all LAX runways are long.
45 Post contains links dynamicsguy : The Age is reporting information about a newly discovered defect which may have been the cause of the oil fire. New warning over A380 engines
46 Zkpilot : LAX Northern runways (24RL) are 8925'/2720m and 10285'/3135m respectively... the southern runways are 12091' and 11095' respectively. That is quite a
47 sunrisevalley : Interesting. So ideally the A380 gates should be on the south side. Presumably they are presently located on the north side. Right... wrong? Frequent
48 N14AZ : Any news about VH-OQA? How and when will it be repaired?
49 kaitak : Sky News has just broken news that QF is instituting legal action against Rolls Royce as a result of the QF32 event. More later ...
50 Post contains links Airvan00 : statement of claim, injunction granted http://www.news.com.au/business/brea...gines/story-e6frfkur-1225964712004 http://www.qantas.com.au/regions/dyn.
51 Post contains links mdword1959 : Here's a link to Flight's news article about the ATSB's announcement with additional details: Pipe fatigue behind Qantas Trent 900 failure: ATSB http:
52 AustrianZRH : Talk about small cause - big effect...
53 art : So a manufacturing defect. Just make them all again and problem fixed, no?
54 NAV20 : More likely just make and fit re-designed and/or properly-made oil tubes? This story, if it checks out, is good news for all concerned. Problem encou
55 Aesma : I recently saw an ad for AF Super Constellations, good old days as you say ! Except last summer a QF 744 departing from LAX had an engine (a RR RB211
56 nomadd22 : As always, the bigger issue is how such a defect could occur in the first place. That sort of thing can gennerally only happen if procedures are igno
57 NAV20 : To use the old army phrase, nomadd22, 'nobody died' (thank God). And you CAN solve a problem once everyone knows what went wrong. That (the solution)
58 Ronaldo747 : Legal action against a favourite engine supplier over decades, that is a massive hit for RR. I wonder if this will affect any (future) QF-orders with
59 Post contains links readytotaxi : And from the BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-11895106
60 Post contains images NAV20 : Felt the same way at first, Ronaldo747, but then did a bit of googling. Turns out that, given that Qantas was able to substitute 747s for most of the
61 Revelation : The full quote is So it would seem the one "stub pipe" needs to be replaced, as opposed to the "bearing package" that had earlier been mentioned? It'
62 mgmacius : It so much reminds me both LOT IL62 crashes - both due to poor workmanship/stupid decisions by the designers. I know, it's completely different part
63 Post contains links Dan23 : Preliminary Report from the ATSB: http://atsb.gov.au/publications/inve...reports/2010/aair/ao-2010-089.aspx
64 cpd : It has also had engine failures too, along with electrical dramas, an oxygen bottle blowing the side out of one plane, etc. I think it's a little bit
65 mdword1959 : Unfortunately, the forum doesn't allow hyper-linking to this subscription site, but the article provides a fairly good summary of the ATSB's prelimin
66 Post contains images N14AZ : Given the sheer size of the financial damage it's obligatory to take legal actions. Otherwise, the shareholders would sue QF's management for not tal
67 Post contains links NAV20 : The thing about any business is, sure, any problem stops you DOING business for a while. But, on the other hand, through NOT being able to do said bu
68 SEPilot : I am astonished that this part got by quality control. I know that in any company for which I have worked a bore that much off center would have been
69 WingedMigrator : New info that I hadn't seen before: - reverse thrust was operative on #3 engine - body gear tires did not burst on landing, but deflated after brake
70 N14AZ : From the ATSB report Any idea what that might be?
71 rottenray : That wasn't my intent - simply mentioning that the Qantas variant of the 747 has a proven record flying the routes it is used for, going back many ye
72 SEPilot : On second thought, what we don't know is how deep the counterbore is in the part. The picture shows the broken off pipe; if it was a foot or so longe
73 Post contains links rottenray : Good point. Here's the prelim ATSB report: http://www.atsb.gov.au/media/2888854...010-089%20preliminary%20report.pdf If you go to page 26 Figure 9, y
74 SEPilot : If that is the case then I stand by my original reaction. I also noted in the photo of the broken pipe how the counterbore did not even clean on the
75 Post contains images rottenray : It's not like they're building the T900 at the same rate as, say, the 4-banger Ford puts in the Focus, et cetera, on a moving assembly line. There's
76 SEPilot : In my career I have many times had assembly people come to me with parts and say that while this part meets tolerances it looks terrible and they don
77 PolymerPlane : How does the counter bore misalignment lead to the fatigue cracking? The fatigue cracks did not appear to be on the transition between the holes. It's
78 N14AZ : Any idea why they put that white rectangle on the picture presented as figure 8?
79 SEPilot : Very simple; the off center position makes one side much thinner, and that is where it cracked. The report states that the fatigue crack originated i
80 cosmofly : Now we know why RR said this Trent 900 failure is not related to the Trent 1000 failure on the test bench.
81 Post contains links jeta380 : In the multi million dollars damages claim launched by Qantas against RR, Qantas state that they are now reduced to carrying only 80 passengers over t
82 tdscanuck : I don't think anyone said impact damage was impossible. Several people said you can't throw a rotor chunk into the other engine, a conclusion which t
83 WingedMigrator : This was the first-hand account of a passenger, as reported in another forum: after the explosion a flame came out of the circular hole. Flame height
84 dynamicsguy : It's in my download as well. It's not large, but seems to be covering something to the lower left of the photo. 3 men appear to be looking at whateve
85 Post contains links and images rottenray : Again, . For several years, I wrote assembly instructions for Motorola GEG, some of which dealt with the legendary PRC-112 survival radios. None of t
86 tdscanuck : My bad...I was looking at the airplane and didn't even notice the rectangle over the people. Yep, it's in my PDF too. Tom.
87 SEPilot : I perhaps have been fortunate in that all of the companies I have worked for have been small (less than 250 total employees) and have generally value
88 tdscanuck : It's important to note that fatigue cracking is *really* non-linear with stress (the exponent can be 4-7). So half the material thickness, if it lead
89 747classic : After reading the preliminary report, the following thoughts and/or questions came up : - Very fast preliminary report from the ATSB, also very good c
90 Revelation : I agree, but it goes up and down the line, IMHO. I used to be very proactive about things to avoid them biting me and my project in the butt later do
91 tdscanuck : This is an accident investigation under ICAO treaty...the amount of information that the OEM's can provide is pretty strictly limited by those laws.
92 SEPilot : I am aware of this. What I do not know is exactly where this pipe is, and whether it is a rotating part. I would think that if it was rotating the of
93 Post contains links Revelation : FlightGlobal says: I'm no expert, but by this description I can't fathom why such a pipe would be rotating. Other interesting stuff from the article:
94 SEPilot : I agree. I understand that the whole bearing structure of the C-mod variant is different. This particular pipe probably doesn't exist on that version
95 frmrCapCadet : I suspect that the air crew is working with investigators (likely including industrial psychologists specializing in communications) and will produce
96 Post contains links and images LTC8K6 : Pic of very poorly machined oil feed pipe: Gallery of more plane damage pics: http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/g...lery-e6frfq80-1225948130539?page=
97 thegeek : This is my experience also. I would go a bit further, and say that managers think less of you for highlighting problems which would occur later.
98 JoeCanuck : Is this a generic example of misaligned counter boring or from a Trent 900?
99 Post contains links Airvan00 : It is my understanding that this is from the actual engine. http://www.atsb.gov.au/media/2888854...%20preliminary%20report.pdf#page=0[Edited 2010-12-
100 2175301 : That's the question: Is this just a case of a single bad part that slipped through the QA cracks.... Or are there a number of these misbored parts in
101 Post contains links AirlineCritic : This picture (originally from the report) is very scary: http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/g...lery-e6frfq80-1225948130539?page=1 It shows soot insid
102 thegeek : If the AC 1 & AC 2 buses weren't working, then the left outboard elevator shouldn't have been either, which contradicts the statement attributed t
103 N14AZ : This is what I thought about almost the entire weekend (don't worrry, since I am currently working in an Arabic country it was just the Friday...) si
104 AirlineCritic : If we look at Figures 3 and 4 from the report, the lower/smaller hole from Figure 3 matches the shape of the upper skin hole from inside the tank in
105 JerseyFlyer : That explains the information from the start that only "some" of the currently-flying engines were potentially suspect. Is the C bearing structure re
106 tdscanuck : One of the chunks severed a thrust link, which is a massive enough piece of material to substantially deflect even something as high energy as a roto
107 frmrCapCadet : Where I read the fairly complete summary of the report at no time were the pilots concerned that the plane was about to lose control and crash. BUT, t
108 JoeCanuck : With the hole in the spar, fuel would have been gushing from there as well as siphoning from the smaller hole above wing. I am still amazed that with
109 Post contains links AirlineCritic : Tom, Yes. I was not thinking that avionics overheat by itself would bring the plane down. However, from a pilot's perspective the airplane is damaged
110 BA174 : Isn't that route the main reason that QF bought a handfull of 744ERs so that they did not have to reduce the payload like thay did on the standard 40
111 tdscanuck : I didn't get that from the report at all. It was damaged, but the heavy system redundancy and cool-headed work of the crew seemed to indicate they, a
112 jetfuel : QF will be likely handing back the A380 to Airbus and more than possibly it will be written off in the hands of Airbus. The damage is almost too serio
113 b707forever : Could QF do that? And what would the ramifications be? From a PR sense for the A380 and from an economic sense for QF? Do you think Boeing is calling
114 jetfuel : No not really. It would be a logistic nightmare and a huge PR fiasco which would likely be the death of Airbus. I think QF will take compensation and
115 Post contains images Kent350787 : Because, of course, QF is entirely happy with the EIS on the 787 and totally on board with Boeing!
116 AusA380 : This is a significant statement - what is the source of such information.
117 Decromin : That doesn't gel with what many have said here so far. The damage may well be serious, but a write off is a big step on a plan this new and publicly
118 WingedMigrator : The figure only shows those fragments whose trajectory could be reconstructed from damage to the aircraft. All three fragments shown in the figure wo
119 jetfuel : Yes it is serious and structural damage not easiluy repaired. Maybe write off is the wrong word. Let me give you a scenario - Qantas sell it back to
120 JoeCanuck : How about it gets sold to RR and they can figure out what to do with it.
121 reality : How did you come to that conclusion? Seems to be off-the-wall crazy unless you have some facts and figures and sources. Please let us know. Oh......I
122 Decromin : OK, but it seems more unlikely than the usual option - Airbus repairs the plane, and RR pays for the repairs directly, or through compensation. That
123 Post contains links JoeCanuck : ATSB gives credit to pilots for saving A380; http://atwonline.com/aircraft-engine...s-pilots-a380-engine-incident-1203 If anyone is looking for a good
124 Stabilator : Isn't that the truth?! 54 errors the pilots needed to handle is a testament to their skill as aviators. Their 72,000 hours no doubt saved many people
125 Starlionblue : Not to take anything away from the skill and professionalism of the pilots, but just because there were 54 errors, doesn't mean all of them needed to
126 Panman : Source? Because I am hearing otherwise via internal emails and toolbox meetings...... PanmaN
127 NAV20 : First, jetfuel, thanks for a terrific new 'talking point'! I hadn't heard that specifically, but I have heard that the A380 is pretty universally 'un
128 N14AZ : If this is really the case - and as AusA380 said it would be nice to have some kind of confirmation, proof whatsoever for such a significant statemen
129 maxter : Isn't the Internet wonderful... It's the only place where one can make outrageous claims anonymously and with not a shred of evidence and actually be
130 thegeek : They are doing precisely that. I'm sure that the current non-LAX ops will be temporary though.
131 jetfuel : They are. They cant fly them on the pacific routes Like I said QF is never going to publicly come out and say that they are disappointed with the ove
132 Decromin : Bad news never goes down well with investors, but neither does covering up information that would have a material impact on share price. In fact, I b
133 jetfuel : If QF cant operate a RR engined a/c with reasonable reliability and promised performance of course it will impact. Please stop ignoring the seriousne
134 Decromin : I'm not ignoring the seriousness of the accident, but i believe you are making the incorrect assumption that the accident is also an indication of ov
135 Post contains images NAV20 : Plenty of other airlines offer services on the 'Kangaroo Route' - basically Heathrow-Singapore-Melbourne/Sydney (with variations such as via Dubai) -
136 jetfuel : The ATSB report released last week shows the No 2 engine was originally fitted as the aircraft's No 4 engine but was removed last year after metal was
137 OzGlobal : It's dismaying that someone can make outrageously sensational assertions like this without sources and be immediately taken seriously be people who w
138 Post contains images EPA001 : That is only true if that performance was promised in the first place. We have seen the A380 taking over multiple B77W routes, see the examples SQ ha
139 kanban : Since about 50% of all the posts to date on both this thread and the 787 threads are unsubstantiated banter by people professing greater knowledge (w
140 Daysleeper : What are you talking about? Its looking more and more like there was a manufacuring glitch with this engine - perhaps that did cause the earlier issu
141 wolbo : It is indeed unfortunate that such claims are made and are not backed up in any way. It's cowardly and in the end posts like that are just food for t
142 LTC8K6 : Why would any regular here think that an unsourced or unlinked claim is a fact? Or take one as such? If a claim is not substantiated, then it's the wr
143 XT6Wagon : No, It is proven that this one engine was just the weakest of the lot. RR would NOT be replacing large numbers of engines because they just feel like
144 Post contains links Aesma : I have no insider information so I'm not claiming anything, but it could just mean RR is improving its product, as is common for new planes and engin
145 DH2Beaver : A problem with one engine - please Daysleeper what planet are you on? If it were a one engine problem the RR share price would not have dropped so dra
146 nycdave : Whenever an uncontained engine failure like that happens -- a wizard did it.
147 jetfuel : Thankyou for an intelligent analysis. Many at QF also see this as the key question as well
148 DocLightning : Given that the aircraft was flyable to a safe landing, I'd say that they did. There are a couple of things that can be improved, but it went quite we
149 jupiter2 : At the prospect of getting flamed by the experts on here, I will post my view of this accident. All onboard this aircraft are probably lucky to be ali
150 Aesma : There were tons of people on board (literally). If push came to shove they could have moved to the front of the plane, stacked like in a sardine can,
151 Post contains links and images jetmech : I just found some interesting detailed drawings of the bearing arrangement for a Rolls-Royce Conway. It should give an idea as to the complexity of be
152 AustrianZRH : Is your claim a consequence of the engine problems and the reduced thrust limit they now face, or do you have a source that it was like that all the
153 tdscanuck : Fortunately, although severe, it's localized. A spar splice looks pretty doable (it's been done before). I'd be shocked if failure of the stabilizer
154 SEPilot : Many statements get made here; some from people who know what they are talking about, and some from people who are blowing hot air. Jetfuel has state
155 jetfuel : And Qantas knows this. Everybody concerned was VERY lucky Without question. I doubt the plane would have made it to any alternate airport This sugges
156 XT6Wagon : While you would have to keep people in actual seats, you could move alot of mass by shifting passengers. move smaller people to the rear, and larger
157 Aesma : You would have to keep them in seats to follow regulations and because that's better for a landing, especially an emergency landing. But if the choic
158 Klaus : In other words: Your claim was not based on any actual inside information as you strongly implied, but entirely based on pure speculation with very l
159 Post contains images astuteman : In other words "the real truth" is nothing more than supposition on your part, based on the current engine issues, and uncorroborable from within QF.
160 N14AZ : Well, some months ago there was a report about QF's plan to increase the number of seats on their A 380s. They will start to modify the cabin outfitti
161 OzGlobal : How did that become the 'key question?' All we know is that QF went from being "delighted" with their a380 T900 performance to pissed off with RR for
162 WingedMigrator : The key question is why did Qantas order another 8 of the type, beyond their original order of 12, once it became known how the aircraft performs?
163 sunrisevalley : Presumably this is a quote from the RR PR department. QF insiders will tell you differently. Is this the third or fourth IFSD that QF has had with th
164 thegeek : Completely disagree. The plane kept flying for a bit over an hour IIRC. 4 hours from LAX towards SYD is probably about that far from HNL. They would
165 JoeCanuck : The biggest piece of luck is that the fuel pouring from the tanks didn't light. Otherwise, the plane held together, redundant systems and personnel p
166 thegeek : That's probably true. Although the only incident I can think of when it did light was the Concorde crash, and that was at low level rather than high
167 Post contains links N14AZ : What comes to my mind is PanAm flight 843 on June 28, 1965. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19650628-0 I once saw a picture of that
168 JoeCanuck : Fire is certainly more dangerous than no fire, but it is impossible to say how the fire would propagate and what damage it would do. Fire is also muc
169 Klaus : And full-on afterburners at the very least "helping" to light the fuel.
170 rwessel : Any aircraft will fly with its CG pretty far out of limit, just so long as you keep some extra speed on. The aft CG limit in particular, is primarily
171 Post contains links 747classic : Rolls denies that it knew about Trent 900 weakness : - "It is not true that we knew about a problem in the A and B versions of the engine and went on
172 Post contains links Airvan00 : Engines with defective part replaced on Qantas, Singapore and Lufthansa A380's http://www.theaustralian.com.au/busi...gines/story-e6frg95x-12259678894
173 SEPilot : This is hardly surprising considering the litigation in the air.
174 trex8 : Wouldn't EASA need to know and wouldn't that be public knowledge then??
175 Post contains links JoeCanuck : The Drama continues... RR lawyers a no show at Qantas compensation hearing; http://atwonline.com/aircraft-engine...ow-compensation-court-hearing-1208
176 SEPilot : Possibly, I don't know. But as soon as the threat of litigation emerges, I think SOP is not to release any information that you don't have to, and th
177 pliersinsight : If I had to make an educated guess (popular on this site, isn't it) as to why they no showed, it would be one of these things: 1. RR's insurer sudden
178 pygmalion : I agree with your statement but they were nearly out of runway as it was. The cockpit calculations showed 60meters left in the configuration they had
179 Airvan00 : Did you read the ATSB full report? Yes they worked it out and they had enough. It wasn't raining. They knew airspeed would be critical. If it was rai
180 Post contains links qantas077 : http://www.aerosocietychannel.com/ae...ntas-qf32-flight-from-the-cockpit/ you might all like to listen to this interview with the Senior Check Captain
181 thegeek : Interesting link, Thanks! He says that electrical buses 1 & 2 weren't working. Am I to understand from that, of the 2H+2E system of the A380, 3/4
182 XT6Wagon : from an earlier report here, it sounds like they have to file in court early to secure the right to sue later for damages. If this is the case, QF wou
183 Post contains links 747classic : Another 3 engines at fault (manufacturing defect) after checking all suspected engines again. One on a not delivered Qantas aircraft (new engines were
184 Post contains links Airvan00 : One of the reasons that Qantas grounded their fleet of A380's They appear to have been aware of the oil pipe problem very early. One of the engines o
185 747classic : I can fully agree with the QF A380 grounding , but why restarting the QF-operation at November 27, several days before publishing the (excelent) ATSB
186 Airvan00 : I am sure QF, RR and Airbus were aware of the ATSB's thinking before the report "went to the printers". Since restarting, QF have only flown 2 of the
187 747classic : I am not questioning in any way the QF decision to regain the A380 operation, the entire handling of this event by the ATSB and QF is(was) IMO excelle
188 Bongodog1964 : RR own the engines fitted to the Qantas fleet, thus its possible that a new plane might have a used engine fitted, or more likely an engine was retur
189 N14AZ : The aircraft due for delivery is MSN 047. It's not a brand-new A 380 but the one, whose parts were convoyed to TLS at the end of 2008 and which made
190 jetfuel : Latest rumour/insider news/opinion from QF snr engineering is that they are now trying to finalise the logistics to repair Nancy in SIN. The suggestio
191 Post contains links and images NAV20 : I'd say that's probably right. So far things are just 'procedural.' However, here's an article that purports to state Qantas' basis of claim:- "QANTA
192 JerseyFlyer : Its all still a bit opaque, but the following would fit: 1 the Trent 900, like every other engine in production, is subject to "continuous improvemen
193 txjim : Are the different engine mods (A/B/C) considered form/fit/function compatible? Can different mods appear on the same aircraft or the same wing?
194 Aesma : I guess it depends what you mean by brand new. After final assembly an A380 is far from delivered, outfitting takes a lot of time. It could even be d
195 Ferpe : There is something going on between RR and QF that is not spoken out by either side: From Flightglobal: "Its A380 fleet is at one-third operation foll
196 sunrisevalley : Can someone familiar with LAX operations confirm that the constraints in the above quotes apply to all A380 operations from LAX or only to QF operati
197 thegeek : Wow, so nine months out of service for her. Not nice. Good thing QF have some other birds on the way to cover the shortfall.
198 Airvan00 : That appears to be the case. Qantas did not accept their latest A380 on Tuesday as it had one engine that was not a "C" . It is now due to be deliver
199 tdscanuck : Because you don't have any basis for a grounding if you don't know the cause. Otherwise, you'd be grounding most fleets a couple of times a year unti
200 747classic : That's exactly what is different in this case. Very early (almost immediately) after this incident RR knew that the rotor burst was caused by overhea
201 mgmacius : Oooppsss... looks like there is bit of truth in Jetfuel claims - he may be lucky, he may not. But it proves his point - NEW aircraft about to be deli
202 Daysleeper : How so? QF didn't accept delivery of the frame because not all the engines were the latest revision. It's going to be swapped for a C and then delive
203 mgmacius : OK, if so, then why was this old engine on new frame in the first place? First they said, that since MSN 047 is equiped with C engines, they are goin
204 Daysleeper : Yeah, its so serious it apparently took a whole day to fix.
205 Post contains images Klaus : No. It had a different engine version. Even under the current circumstances that does not automatically mean that the engine was broken. Maybe your j
206 jetfuel : The A380's that QF are accepting now have been in storage for some time and I guess that may mean old engines. Simple fact is RR does not have suffice
207 francoflier : This is a requirement specific to QF's operation. The extra thrust they need is to lift the a full payload out of the more restrictive runways at LAX
208 Post contains links mdword1959 : A new wrinkle: http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...rolls-royce-trent-900-engines.html
209 Post contains images winglets747 : Let me clarify a few issues as best as I can from my reporting of QF32 and Trent 900s. The ATSB has said it found the stub pipe issue only a few days
210 Post contains images astuteman : I'm not sure what all the speculation about "new engines" is all about. Surely we are talking about either "new stub pipes", or "old engines with the
211 Post contains links 747classic : Now also SQ is modifying all "A mod." engines to "C mod." status, the "B mod." version will follow ASAP. Summary : QF is only operating two A380 aircr
212 Panman : I am going to take everything you say with a pinch of salt as a few days earlier you were the one saying that they were going to scrap it. Internally
213 Revelation : I imagine it's because QF just leases engines from RR, and perhaps RR had the contractual freedom to put the older engine on the frame. What we've be
214 astuteman : It certainly sounds plausible that changes have not been restricted to the lub oil pipe Rgds
215 kanban : you had a question on my logic about the wing repair.. and that thread was cancelled... If you're still curious, shot me an email via the site and I'
216 JoeCanuck : I think there is a shortage of engines...period so any engine they get will be new. I think new engines doesn't necessarily mean a new type of engine
217 WingedMigrator : What he meant is that defective engines taken off aren't scrapped. They are sent back to the factory for relatively minor modifications and come righ
218 jetfuel : So do you want to tell everybody about your internal source? Its fine to discuss but if you are not going to update info to hand then what's your poi
219 rcair1 : I found this fascinating and as I listened I was more and more convinced this was a very serious incident - I'm trending more towards the "very lucky
220 jetfuel : I think that everybody was incredibly lucky. From the initial uncontained failure and the damage it caused to getting her on the ground in one piece.
221 Post contains links JoeCanuck : It's not entirely clear what Qantas is after. They don't say how many engines they specifically want replaced or how many are suitable to repair. It
222 Post contains images WingedMigrator : "other Boeing types I have flown" = B767, B742, B744, none of which are fly by wire aircraft. In a FBW aircraft the control systems will automagicall
223 Post contains images Klaus : I guess the issue was the left wing gear which had both hot brakes and was exposed to fuel leaking out of the wing above (the others should not have
224 Post contains links JerseyFlyer : This seems to be an important additional safeguard: "In addition, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) approved software updates to the Rolls-Ro
225 Post contains links JerseyFlyer : "•Engine display for Nos 1 and 4 engines had reverted to a degraded mode (indicates that some air data or engine parameters are not available) " ht
226 rcair1 : I aggree I'm sure they were, but I suspect it is a 2ndary protocal. I suspect that they are trained to stay away from running engines which means app
227 Klaus : At least cooling down the brakes should have been possible pretty directly. I don't know the equipment they've got over there, but a vehicle-mounted
228 Post contains links zeke : Trents are EPR controlled engines, which basically is measuring the pressure difference between intake side of the engine, and in the exhaust nozzle,
229 zeke : My guess they were thinking it would be safer for the engine to rundown due to lack of fuel, and it may have taken some time to work out ways to remo
230 Post contains images Klaus : Any ideas why #4 would degrade together with #1? Are their operation modes coupled to maintain symmetric behaviour? (Shutting down #3 for that would
231 zeke : My guess is that during the failure a lot of different switching something would have happened which prevented the FADEC to see one of the normal req
232 AirlineCritic : Interesting. I wonder if the safe approach area with regards to tires happens to be the unsafe approach with regards to a running engine?
233 2175301 : The recordings would have been informative; but not crucial because this was a mechanical problem and there is no evidence of pilot(s) error in the d
234 Panman : Nope. Not ready to jeopardize my livelihood to satisfy some airlines.net fanboy. pAnmAn
235 Post contains images Klaus : One would expect they'd have checked for that before ultimately assuming the engine to be compromised and accepting limited controllability under the
236 zeke : It is not limited controllability, you can actually dispatch with and engine in N1 rated mode.
237 PolymerPlane : From the interview this is not totally accurate. He mentioned that the A380 felt "very sluggish" after losing the control surfaces. If the FBW really
238 SEPilot : Sure it would. The computers cannot change the laws of aerodynamics, and having half of the control surfaces inactive would make control sluggish no
239 WingedMigrator : Never said it would. I said it would adapt to the changes in the 'plant'. Say you had a bunch of wreckage and a windmilling engine hanging off the le
240 thegeek : I read that they landed with the flaps one setting away from full flaps. I thought this was strange: if you don't need/want full flaps for an overwei
241 Tristarsteve : There are a lot of references in this thread to fuel transfer. Can we be clear that on an airliner you do not transfer fuel between tanks in flight.
242 ZuluAlpha : Tonight, I have also heard that "Nancy" is going to repaired work in SIN. I have heard that Airbus is sending a wing to SIN (could the Airbus Beluga
243 AustrianZRH : Wasn't there something in the Air Transat A332 case which glided to Lajes that they had a leak in an engine and thus gut fuel imbalance. Then they ac
244 747classic : On the 747-100/200/300 series fuel transfer during flight was/is possible, with the cockpit refuelling panel in override/battery you could open all r
245 okie : Crossfeed on the 332 just allows the fuel to be supplied to the turbine on the opposite side of the aircraft, it does not transfer the fuel between t
246 N14AZ : Thanks for the information. Although, for an outsider this appears a little bit strange. Once they have replaced the wing, why do they have still to
247 zeke : With the EPR mode they are able to extract a little more thrust, and better control at higher thrust settings. Taking off in N1 rated mode results in
248 AustrianZRH : Thanks, that makes sense.
249 474218 : Which would make more sense! Removing and replacing a wing is a huge task. Before a wing could be replaced, tooling would have to be built that would
250 Post contains links moderators : This thread will be locked for further contributions. If you would like to continue your discussion on this topic, please feel free to contribute in p
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