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N600XL Finally In The US  
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 8981 times:

The Embraer Legacy involved in the tragic mid air collision over the Brazilian Amazon has finally arrived on US soil 4 years after starting its trip. I found it interesting to read the story below and what was needed to finally get it off the military base. Amazed the engines survived that long in the jungle without following the established storage program. As well they even flew it with the damage that we were hearing about to the wing box.

http://www.ainonline.com/news/single...l-midair-finally-on-us-soil-27619/


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineN471wn From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1531 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 8375 times:
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This is a great story and hopefully this a/c will go on to lead a long life.

User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8961 posts, RR: 40
Reply 2, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 8275 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Thread starter):
Amazed the engines survived that long in the jungle

Maybe the heavy inspection could be carried out in the desert, to dry out the plane a bit  

Anyways, it's good to hear the plane is being put back into service.



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineunattendedbag From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 2326 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 8254 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Thread starter):
As well they even flew it with the damage that we were hearing about to the wing box.

Why didn't it land in Nashville? Not enough room on the ramp?



Slower traffic, keep right
User currently offlineairtechy From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 500 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 8176 times:

It would be interesting to see the ferry permit for this flight. The last one I saw was for the flight of Elvis's old Convair from Fort Lauderdale to Memphis. It was in pretty bad shape.  Wow!

User currently onlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 22935 posts, RR: 20
Reply 5, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 8147 times:

Quoting unattendedbag (Reply 3):
Why didn't it land in Nashville? Not enough room on the ramp?

Don't all Embraer deliveries go to FLL?



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 8133 times:

Quoting EMBQA (Thread starter):
Amazed the engines survived that long in the jungle without following the established storage program.


From the fourth paragraph of your reference: The fuel tanks were clean and the Rolls-Royce AE3007 engines had been preserved–although they hadn't been run, they were in good shape. “We did extensive boroscoping and testing to verify the validity of the engines,”...

I think you will find that "had been preserved" means they were prepared for storage!


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 7, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 7890 times:

Quoting 474218 (Reply 6):
I think you will find that "had been preserved" means they were prepared for storage

Incorrect.. The Rolls Royce manual requires the engines to be run every 90 days when in storage..You are required to de-preserve them, run them for 15 minutes.. then re-preserve them for another 90 days. The APU is 90 days as well.

Quoting Cubsrule (Reply 5):
Don't all Embraer deliveries go to FLL?

Most but not all. This was not under the control of Embraer. FLL is just a good point of entry when coming from that part of the world.

Quoting unattendedbag (Reply 3):
Why didn't it land in Nashville? Not enough room on the ramp?

LoL.. What's one more...!! Strange comment about Constant being the 'only one' to have ever change a wing on a ERJ.. we've done 3.

[Edited 2010-11-24 13:01:19]


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineunattendedbag From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 2326 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 7509 times:

From the linked article:

Quoting Constant Aviation president Stephen Maiden (Thread starter):
“We did extensive boroscoping and testing to verify the validity of the engines,”

What kind of test is used to determine whether something is an aircraft engine or not? I would imagine a blind monkey could look at an aircraft engine and say, "Hey, that's an aircraft engine!"

If they had to perform a test for that, I wouldn't want them working on my plane!



Slower traffic, keep right
User currently offlineNumero4 From Canada, joined Feb 2010, 260 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 7468 times:

For people like myself who are a little less knowledgeable in the field, what exactly is a ferry flight? Does that mainly imply that the airframe be flown unpressurized at lower altitudes?

Thanks!



CYQB
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 7296 times:

Quoting unattendedbag (Reply 8):

There are several sections of the internal engine that have access with borescope plugs. In a case like this you would be mainly looking for corrosion on the inner surfaces, corrosion on the blades and for any damage from sucking something in. It many even be an EMM requirement after prolonged storage... or part of the ETD to ferry it out.

Quoting Numero4 (Reply 9):
what exactly is a ferry flight?

A flight not for revenue or when moving a plane from point a to b for maintenance. Pressurization and altitude are not factors.. but could be depending on the reason for the flight.

[Edited 2010-11-24 14:27:49]


"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offline7673mech From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 722 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 7159 times:
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Quoting unattendedbag (Reply 8):
What kind of test is used to determine whether something is an aircraft engine or not? I would imagine a blind monkey could look at an aircraft engine and say, "Hey, that's an aircraft engine!"

A boroscope (looking at the inside of the engine), general visual inspection and power assurance run will validate an engine at least for ferry purposes. As EMBQA points out they haven't been maintained to OEM specs however these simple checks will at least make them ready to ferry.

Quoting unattendedbag (Reply 3):
Why didn't it land in Nashville? Not enough room on the ramp?

Or just go back to the factory?


User currently offlineKELPkid From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 6372 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5535 times:

Quoting Numero4 (Reply 9):
For people like myself who are a little less knowledgeable in the field, what exactly is a ferry flight?

Well, in this case, the aircraft is a little less than airworthy (by the standard definition), which means that, for a US registered aircraft, a ferry permit must be issued. This usually means that an engineer or two from the manufacturer has examimned the plane, noted the defeciencies, and given recommendations on how to fly the plane (e.g. airspeeds or g-loadings not to exceed if the structure is compromised), and that the flight crew who flies the aircraft on the ferry permit adheres to those conditions.



Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
User currently offlineNumero4 From Canada, joined Feb 2010, 260 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (3 years 9 months 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5307 times:

Thanks! And in this particular case of an international ferry flight, who issues the ferry permit? FAA?


CYQB
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