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BA274 Squawking Emergency Code 7700  
User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3947 posts, RR: 18
Posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32840 times:

BAW274 over Stornoway squawking 7700. B772 G-YMMS. Anyone with intel?  Wow!

50 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCHRISBA777ER From UK - England, joined Mar 2001, 5964 posts, RR: 62
Reply 1, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32720 times:

Was going to call their ops and revert but guess they might be a bit busy.

Fingers crossed its just a fault.



What do you mean you dont have any bourbon? Do you know how far it is to Houston? What kind of airline is this???
User currently offlinerscaife1682 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 332 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32726 times:

Got it on my work flight tracker (WebASD) still cruising along.

RYAN
FLTOPS


User currently offlineKFLLCFII From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 3301 posts, RR: 30
Reply 3, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32723 times:

Hard to make that mistake. Hoping for the best.


"About the only way to look at it, just a pity you are not POTUS KFLLCFII, seems as if we would all be better off."
User currently offlineBAW076 From UK - Scotland, joined Aug 2006, 750 posts, RR: 26
Reply 4, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32688 times:

Just seen it myself on flightradar24, she's heading South-East, just over Stranraer, FL370 at 511 knots, still Squawking 7700. - Seems to be heading to Heathrow still. Showing on the Heathrow website as 'Expected 1516' - Hardly likely as it's now 1440, doubtful even at 511 knots she'll be down for 1516 !! - Will monitor progress.

[Edited 2010-12-10 06:39:45]


N754AN (x2), G-CPEL, G-MIDE, G-BPEC, G-BZHC, EI-DCH, LN-KKN, G-VIIW, G-BNLT, G-DBCA, G-MEDE, G-DBCE, G-MIDP.
User currently offlineOak522 From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 71 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32682 times:

777 doing LAS-LHR. Showing 90min late out of Vegas last night.

User currently offlineSevernaya From Russia, joined Jan 2009, 1403 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32627 times:

For the record it's G-YMMS, B772.


Всяк глядит, да не всяк видит.
User currently offlineRobK From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 3947 posts, RR: 18
Reply 7, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32632 times:

Maybe someone can pick it up on Scottish VHF airband?

User currently offlineBAW076 From UK - Scotland, joined Aug 2006, 750 posts, RR: 26
Reply 8, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32566 times:

Quoting Severnaya (Reply 6):
For the record it's G-YMMS, B772.

That was already stated at the top of the thread!



N754AN (x2), G-CPEL, G-MIDE, G-BPEC, G-BZHC, EI-DCH, LN-KKN, G-VIIW, G-BNLT, G-DBCA, G-MEDE, G-DBCE, G-MIDP.
User currently offlineSevernaya From Russia, joined Jan 2009, 1403 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32398 times:

Changed now to Squawk: 7406


Всяк глядит, да не всяк видит.
User currently offlinephklm From Northern Mariana Islands, joined Dec 2005, 1198 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32392 times:

Normal squawk code again, think it was a mistake.

User currently offlineOak522 From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 71 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32343 times:

Fairly daft mistake.

User currently offlineBAW076 From UK - Scotland, joined Aug 2006, 750 posts, RR: 26
Reply 12, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32344 times:

...or maybe there was a problem with the aircraft, which has been rectified by the pilots?


N754AN (x2), G-CPEL, G-MIDE, G-BPEC, G-BZHC, EI-DCH, LN-KKN, G-VIIW, G-BNLT, G-DBCA, G-MEDE, G-DBCE, G-MIDP.
User currently offlinerscaife1682 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 332 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32297 times:

http://cobaltss.net/gallery/files/2/0/1/1/1/baw247_579386.jpg

User currently offlinerscaife1682 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 332 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32288 times:

sorry not the best looking image

User currently offlineJBirdAV8r From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 4489 posts, RR: 21
Reply 15, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 31950 times:

Quoting phklm (Reply 10):
Normal squawk code again, think it was a mistake.

That's not something you do by mistake. It was probably either a new squawk given by ATC (pretty sure 7500/7600/7700 cause them a huge number of alarms and displays) or the flight crew declared the emergency was over.



I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
User currently offline413X3 From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 1983 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 31377 times:

Looks like a normal flight plan to me, probably a mistake.

User currently offlineCOS777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 90 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 29928 times:

I don't many scenarios where an airplane on an IFR flight plan would need to squawk 7700 anyway. If you are in radar coverage you are probably in radio coverage, so it would be easiest to declare an emergency over the radio. I don't know the details about how well the radar computers keep airplanes tagged-up, but I would think it could add more confusion if you are changing from a discrete code to 7700. I guess if there is constant radio chatter or a stuck mike, that would be one thing. Otherwise, 7700 seems most appropriate for a VFR flight where you don't have time to figure out the ATC frequencies and you want someone watching you on radar and the radar recordings should the worst happen.

User currently offlineB777LRF From Luxembourg, joined Nov 2008, 1332 posts, RR: 3
Reply 18, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 29662 times:

Quoting COS777 (Reply 17):
I don't many scenarios where an airplane on an IFR flight plan would need to squawk 7700 anyway. If you are in radar coverage you are probably in radio coverage

Except, of course, for the obvious scenario when the radio(s) fail to work as advertised .....

Happened to me once, in the middle of Europe at FL3andalot and supposedly within the range of umpteen hundred ground stations. Never the less, the radio(s) failed to recognise that fact and were silent as the grave. That's when we squawked 7700 and proceeded strictly as per flightplan. Radios never came back, and we had to land with visual landing clearnace only. Wrote it up in the book, filed the necessary reports and left for the hotel and quite a few landing beers. I've been reliably informed it's a very rare occurance indeed, right up there with loosing an engine 2 seconds before V1.



From receips and radials over straight pipes to big fans - been there, done that, got the hearing defects to prove
User currently offlineCOS777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 90 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 29549 times:

Quoting B777LRF (Reply 18):
Except, of course, for the obvious scenario when the radio(s) fail to work as advertised .....

Happened to me once, in the middle of Europe at FL3andalot and supposedly within the range of umpteen hundred ground stations. Never the less, the radio(s) failed to recognise that fact and were silent as the grave. That's when we squawked 7700 and proceeded strictly as per flightplan. Radios never came back, and we had to land with visual landing clearnace only. Wrote it up in the book, filed the necessary reports and left for the hotel and quite a few landing beers. I've been reliably informed it's a very rare occurance indeed, right up there with loosing an engine 2 seconds before V1.

You lost your radios and had another emergency at the same time? Otherwise it would be 7600...

[Edited 2010-12-10 12:14:48]

[Edited 2010-12-10 12:16:23]

[Edited 2010-12-10 12:27:00]

User currently offlineLarshjort From Denmark, joined Dec 2007, 1454 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 29483 times:

Quoting B777LRF (Reply 18):
Except, of course, for the obvious scenario when the radio(s) fail to work as advertised .....

except that the crew would be squawking 7600 in case of lost communications, not 7700.

Quoting COS777 (Reply 17):
I don't many scenarios where an airplane on an IFR flight plan would need to squawk 7700 anyway.

Could it be to make it easier for the ATC crew to pinpoint the exact aircraft on the screen quickly?

/Lars



139, 306, 319, 320, 321, 332, 34A, AN2, AT4, AT5, AT7, 733, 735, 73G, 738, 739, 146, AR1, BH2, CN1, CR2, DH1, DH3, DH4,
User currently offlineCOS777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 90 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 29175 times:

Quoting Larshjort (Reply 20):
Could it be to make it easier for the ATC crew to pinpoint the exact aircraft on the screen quickly?

I'm not an air traffic controller, but I would say no. When you are on a discrete code, the computer has your flight number tagged to your code along with other details of your flight. I'm not sure, but I would guess that when you change to 7700, the computer doesn't know that 7700=you, so all that stuff is wiped out until ATC puts it back in or you go back to your old code. Maybe it can keep track of the blips on the radar in a switch like that, I don't know. I would guess it actually makes things more complicated going to 7700.

I think ATC has a pretty good idea of where most airplanes are anyway. If not, they could ask you to utilize the "Ident" function on your transponder if they needed you to.

[Edited 2010-12-10 12:39:42]

User currently onlinereadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3228 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 28702 times:

So for those of us who do not know all the squawk codes and what they mean can we have a list pls. TIA  


you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
User currently offlineokierj From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 5 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 28553 times:

Quoting Larshjort (Reply 20):
Could it be to make it easier for the ATC crew to pinpoint the exact aircraft on the screen quickly?

/Lars

The answer is that it would make it easier. Even though this is a different beacon code, the computer does not drop the data tag. The tag would keep the aircraft info and begin to flash at the controller as well. It would also have an EM attached to the tag.


User currently offlineIFACN From Italy, joined Nov 2005, 153 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (3 years 8 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 28453 times:

1200 = VFR flight (US)

7000 = VFR flight (EU and don't know wherever else)

7500 = hijack

7600 = comms inop

7700 = emergency


25 COS777 : I can say I learned something new today.
26 B777LRF : Ah, yes, quite right. I shall RTFQ more dilligently in the future!
27 Post contains images anshuk : Thank you for that! Same here. Precisely what I love about this website
28 noelg : Not sure about how this differs in an airliner, but on a light aircraft you have to be very careful when changing the squawk code not to inadvertently
29 DocLightning : So did we ever get an answer?
30 musang : Sometimes a new squawk is assigned when you enter a new country. From Austria back to the UK today - original squawk from the origin, Germany gave us
31 airportugal310 : Methinks that unless you have a real problem onboard, thats not the best way to go about it. The queries you will get from that will be much worse th
32 COS777 : My whole point it based on having an emergency which would mean you indeed have a "real problem" on board. Squawking 7700 declares an emergency and g
33 scrappy27 : It was a medical emergency.. I just operated BA293 into IAD on YMMS.. and we were delayed because of it.
34 ThirtyEcho : Sounds like the new code was dialed through 7700 just as the transponder was interrogated. Don't ever dial through 7700 unless you want to see some F-
35 Post contains images Airvan00 : Try and select code 7845.. If they did that they are having a joke. cheers Seasons Greetings
36 B777fan : You of course are correct that on some transponders it is easy to briefly set an emergency squawk code accidentally, but it usually only for one rada
37 Post contains links Maverick623 : It's really not that dramatic, especially with 7700. If a controller notices it, he will call you up and ask you if everything's okay. If you just sa
38 Post contains links Klaus : If I've heard correctly, this should get easier when the airspace of Benelux+Germany+France+Switzerland will get unified as was agreed upon recently:
39 musang : Difficult to "dial through" 7700 on a transponder with a keyboard input, rather than a rotating knob type which I agree carries that risk. Our policy
40 nkops : I think 7500 would get the job done quicker.....
41 Post contains images leezyjet : It might not have a direct affect on the ATC computers, as another poster has said it keeps the data, however it may affect other user's systems that
42 Maverick623 : Not sure if you were joking or not, but unless someone is headed towards a populated/built up area AND not responding AND it can be confirmed that th
43 Post contains images nkops : Thats odd.... that was not my quote!! However, I've never heard of that and hope to never find out
44 N593HA : Since I did not read any confirmation yet. Did BA274 land safely at LHR?
45 EGGD : Well if you take the following information into account: I think we can adequately conclude that it did in fact, safely land at Heathrow.
46 N6238P : I'm going to ask a dumb question here but isn't it normal procedure to turn the transponder to standby when changing codes just to prevent this very t
47 EGGD : No, that is what you should be trained to do.
48 RJLover : When I was training for my PPL I was taught to change the squawk code from the right to the left (that way you shouldn't have two zeros as the last t
49 PennStation : Reminds me of the quiet evening many years ago when I purposely assigned 7736 (or some other discrete 77xx code) to an air carrier landing LAX. We all
50 Rendezvous : In New Zealand we have always been trained to put the transponder to standby before changing codes. However where I work now we operate aircraft where
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