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"Continental" Comes Up With A New Fee  
User currently offlineNorthwest727 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 491 posts, RR: 1
Posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 19464 times:

I put "Continental" in quotations, as the media source cites CO, even though we all know that CO is retired, its now UA. Unless of course, we are still talking about the independently operating companies right now...

Quote:
Continental Airlines comes up with new fee

DALLAS — Continental Airlines says it will let passengers hold a reservation and lock in a quoted ticket price for up to a week — all for a new fee.

The offer, called FareLock, will give travelers three days or a week extra while they can decide whether to buy the ticket or let the reservation expire.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...continental14.html?syndication=rss



Edit: forgot the reference link

[Edited 2010-12-14 06:24:45]

59 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineoffloaded From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 871 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 19274 times:

I don't know about online reservations, as I always use a travel agent, but I know most itineraries either starting in the US or containing US domestic sectors they can only every guarantee for 24 hrs, compared to over here where 3 - 7 days (or more if the fare is a higher category) is more normal.

I can't decide if this is genius or the biggest rip off I've ever heard. I'm thinking "genius" as if the itinerary is already built in the system the airline will actually save time in many cases where fares have expired and staff would have to build itineraries again.

I think calling most airlines in the US is still free though right, even if you are charged a booking fee? That's got to be the next fee - take out the 800 numbers, make them 900 / 976 and charge $2.99 a minute! Employees could get a bonus for keeping clients on the phone for longer.



To no one will we sell, or deny, or delay, right or justice - Magna Carta, 1215
User currently offlineLAXDESI From United States of America, joined May 2005, 5086 posts, RR: 48
Reply 2, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 18874 times:

It's a modest fee in the range of $5 to $9. From the passenger's perspective, you are buying an option which allows you to keep looking for cheaper fares during the 3-7 day farelock period. It also allows you to cancel your trip for a small fee, which I would have liked on my last booking. I hope more airlines follow suit.

User currently offlineTomFoolery From Austria, joined Jan 2004, 528 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 18725 times:

I have seen this on other sites here in Europe. I believe KLM has such a "Service" in place. I was curious how this one will play out in the future.

I cant say that I am terribly inclined to use such a system, but thats just me.



Paper makes an airplane fly
User currently offlinessides From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 4059 posts, RR: 21
Reply 4, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 18643 times:

This isn't a new fee, it's a new service. It's just like purchasing a stock option. My guess is that most travelers would jump at the chance to lock in a fare -- with no obligation to purchase the ticket -- for such a small fee.


"Lose" is not spelled with two o's!!!!
User currently offlineJA From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 563 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 18566 times:

Ancillary revenue. It is a fee that can generate revenue through non-users (which is new for an airline outside of advertising). It also puts immense pressure on competing airline prices.

User currently offlineenilria From Canada, joined Feb 2008, 7047 posts, RR: 13
Reply 6, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 18306 times:

Quoting Northwest727 (Thread starter):
"Continental" Comes Up With A New Fee

This may seem like a minor quibble to the OP, but I would have said "Continental Comes Up With a New Service". It doesn't bother me if CO creates something new and charges for it. I think that's great and they deserve to be compensated for a new feature. "A new fee" implies they are adding a fee without adding any new features which I hate. If you have an IPhone app for free and they offer a "Pro" version for $5 that adds real time info or some other cool offering, I expect them to charge for that.

So, basically I'm saying don't complain about a "fee" if it accompanies a new service. Then you are just discouraging advancement in the industry.

Quoting LAXDESI (Reply 2):
It's a modest fee in the range of $5 to $9.

That's the minimum. If you try to use it close in to departure, it can be a lot more.


User currently offlineacey559 From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 1523 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 18183 times:

I like the idea. I was thinking about something like this a little while ago when I was looking to book a reward ticket on DL, because it gave me the option to save the itinerary at the selected mileage level for 24 hours. For price sensitive shoppers, this seems like a good deal, and it's not like it really costs the airline much, so they'll take all the money they gain from this.

User currently offlineckfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5181 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 17031 times:

And yet, most reservations for hotels and rental cars can be cancelled or changed with no additional fee. I have booked hotel rooms, only to cancel and rebook, after the rate has gone down.

On the other hand, you can always use a website like Yapta to keep track of a fare for a specific intinerary.


User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 16826 times:

Quoting ckfred (Reply 8):
And yet, most reservations for hotels and rental cars can be cancelled or changed with no additional fee

And yet......you're talking about a completely different thing, and different market, entirely.


User currently offlineplaneguy727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1240 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 16486 times:

Does anyone else wonder if this will impact revenue from "change fees?"


I want to live in an old and converted 727...
User currently offlineixemctdca From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 53 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 16382 times:

There have been times in the recent past where spending the $9 on holding the price would've saved me $100.

I think that this is a decent idea, but only in certain situations.



-ixemctdca
User currently offlineChopChop767 From Italy, joined Aug 2010, 226 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 16287 times:

I would think that smaller companies that have a lot of travelers, or perhaps even your large corporate accounts, might utilize the service. Certainly, this will be cheaper than Y fares, and it might be better to pay a $50 hold for tickets for EWR to ORD, than it would be to pay $900 for a ticket and have it fully refundable. Personally, I would rather pay for the hold fee for a possible trip than book a pricey full fare refundable ticket. Great move!


this year: nap, lgw, fra, dub, fco, add, jib, muc, iad, sea, dca, bos, cdg, ist, bah, prg, ord, hsv, cmn
User currently offlinegolfradio From Canada, joined Jun 2009, 749 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 16069 times:

I am all for more of these creative ways to increase revenue instead of moronic ideas like fees for cabin baggage, checked baggage, using a credit card etc.

This is a service I can see myself using in the future. Good on CO.


User currently offlinebjorn14 From Norway, joined Feb 2010, 3396 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 15894 times:

Can someone please explain to me how this will work? If my plans change and I don't take the trip do they then charge my credit card the $5-9? Thanks.


"I want to know the voice of God the rest is just details" --A. Einstein
User currently offlinegolfradio From Canada, joined Jun 2009, 749 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 15846 times:

Quoting bjorn14 (Reply 14):
If my plans change and I don't take the trip do they then charge my credit card the $5-9

You hold the itinerary but do not purchase the ticket. If you do not buy until the hold expires, you will be charged the fee.


User currently offlinebjorn14 From Norway, joined Feb 2010, 3396 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 15719 times:

If I want to get the lowest fare and there are several "holds" on that fare which forces me to buy a higher priced ticket and the holds subsequently get released then I kind of get ripped off. Correct? Good for CO/UA, bad for me.


"I want to know the voice of God the rest is just details" --A. Einstein
User currently offlinegolfradio From Canada, joined Jun 2009, 749 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 15505 times:

Quoting bjorn14 (Reply 16):
If I want to get the lowest fare and there are several "holds" on that fare which forces me to buy a higher priced ticket and the holds subsequently get released then I kind of get ripped off. Correct?

No, you are guaranteed the price and the itinerary until the expiry. If you got a farelock, you are guaranteed a ticket till the lock expires. Under the hood, they might limit the number of holds to the number of seats available for that price. It's a win-win situation. If you do not buy then CO can release the seat at a higher price and also make a small profit. The fee might probably have been the yield on that ticket to start with.


User currently offlineMSPNWA From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 1914 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 15213 times:

I think this is a great service. It would have saved me about 65 dollars the last time I bought a ticket. I wasn't ready to book quite yet, and by the time I was ready the price went up. And the best part of this "fee" is that it's entirely optional.

User currently offlineYULWinterSkies From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 2176 posts, RR: 5
Reply 19, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 15128 times:

Air France USA does it for $20, for reservations held up to a week. I think it's great when there's a sweet deal around on one specific day/flight but final travel plans still need to be made.
On a, say, $800 international ticket, this $20 is worth it, if you start seeing fares on next/previous day being already 200-300 higher (that happens a lot).



When I doubt... go running!
User currently offlineSFO2SVO From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 398 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 14769 times:

Agreed, as long as this fee stays under $20, that's one new fee (ok, service which comes with it) I actually welcome.
Comes very handy when you're coordinating several people coming from different places.



318-19-20-21 332 343 717 727 737-234578 743-4 752 763 772 D9/10 M11/8x/90 F70 RJ85 ATR72 SF340 E120 TU34/54 IL18/62/86/9
User currently offlineikramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21476 posts, RR: 60
Reply 21, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 14690 times:

I don't defend new fees for things you could previously do for free, but if there is a new service that is adding value and is reasonably priced, I'm not against it. Currently, only FF tickets have this longer hold period, while purchased tickets have no hold.

I think this sounds like a good program. Currently, only elites can cancel without penalty, and it's within 24 hours, and it involves a credit to your account that can take a while.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlinejpyvr From Canada, joined Jan 2000, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 14653 times:

Sure beats charging for carry-on luggage. For this $9 the traveler (or potential traveler) actually receives something that he or she didn't have before starting the booking - a reservation and a fare that are guaranteed for a period of time. I'm definitely with on "you go, CO" crowd on this new fee or service or whatever you want to call it.

User currently offlineairbazar From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 8237 posts, RR: 10
Reply 23, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 14338 times:

Quoting golfradio (Reply 17):
Quoting bjorn14 (Reply 16):
If I want to get the lowest fare and there are several "holds" on that fare which forces me to buy a higher priced ticket and the holds subsequently get released then I kind of get ripped off. Correct?

No, you are guaranteed the price and the itinerary until the expiry. If you got a farelock, you are guaranteed a ticket till the lock expires.

I think he's making a different point which I agree. Lets say I want to book a flight today but all the lower fares are on hold by prospective customers who are still shopping around. Bu tI know that I need to travel "tomorrow" so I go ahead and fully book for the next available fare which is likely to be higher than some of those that are on hold. In other words, customers who have a rigid schedule are screwed by those who are able to hold on for a few days until they make up their mind.
At first this sounds like a great idea, but in the end all it means is higher fares for most people due to the lower fares being constantly "on hold", and additional revenue for the airline for both, selling me a higher fare that what's "actually available", and charging somebody else a fee for a ticket they'll eventually buy anyway  
Genious for the airline, crappy for the consumer.


User currently offlinemogandoCI From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (3 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 13771 times:

Quoting airbazar (Reply 23):
Bu tI know that I need to travel "tomorrow" so I go ahead and fully book for the next available fare which is likely to be higher than some of those that are on hold. In other words, customers who have a rigid schedule are screwed by those who are able to hold on for a few days until they make up their mind.

The only people i imagine still holding for TOMORROW's ticket are travel agents who are perpetuity holding inventory in hopes of selling higher fare bucket to their clients and earning a higher commission.

For most, it's simply consumers paying a tiny insurance fee so they can think through their travel plans (e.g. hold it first, then ask boss for permission for days off)

In this world of non-refundable non-cancellable non-changeable no-routing-change no-name-change no-date-change no-flight-time-change tickets (okay i'm exaggerating here  ), $5 is a tiny fee for a peace of mind (esp that this fee actually adds value as opposed to some stupid $45 carry-on fee or some $1 toilet fee)

kudos to CO


25 Post contains images enilria : Almost all changes are made within the last two weeks before the flight. They are not charging $5/9 for changes in that timeframe. The fees are much
26 r2rho : The thread title is misleading. This is a new service, and as such, is charged at a price. It is not a "new fee" for a previously free service, as the
27 einsteinboricua : I like the idea and would use it. Just last week I was searching options for SJU-SEA and found US for $373 round trip. The morning I wanted to book, t
28 Goblin211 : I 100% agree. For once I think this is a fee everyone would like! "Reservation for two on the 8 a.m. Seattle flight--Goblin211" "Sure, right this way
29 Post contains images bjorn14 : All airline pricing is like gambling.
30 gdg9 : If people are willing to pay it, more power to UA/CO.
31 777jaah : The way I understand it sounds great. I could use a fee like that for my personal trips. Hope many more will follow them.
32 LipeGIG : I don't see a problem in a fee you can avoid (i.e. buy the ticket) or if you want to take advantage of the fare locked while you wait for something li
33 hohd : Who said it is $5 to $9. From what I have heard, it is more like $30 to $50 and is offered only on some flights.
34 Grid : So who came up with it? Does booking on United offer the same service?
35 meta : I saw a similar service being offered by AF and KL on their websites. I think it was called The Time to Think option and it was about $20 for them to
36 slcdeltarumd11 : I like this idea, lets you buy a small insurance policy as place holder. Especially good if you find a last minute fare, pretty full plane, or last se
37 brilondon : AA has this service for 24 hours and it is free. I hope that they don't start charging me for htis.
38 longhauler : It is in the link, $5 to hold for three days, $9 to hold for a week. But you are correct, it does say at least those prices, so it could well be more
39 flybyguy : Now that CO is charging for fare holds... you bet your AAss AA is gonna get rid of the free 24 hour hold and make it pay per use. I think this has th
40 764 : Precisely. Fees are going to increase the more of the following "risk factors" you have (to borrow a term from the insurance world): 1) Short time un
41 bjorn14 : Does anybody know if you buy the hold and don't cancel is the ticket is automatically issued or do you have to go back in to the site and buy the tick
42 Aloha717200 : Honestly, I like this idea. Often when comparing different airfares, I find that the price goes up the more I look. As I recall, this controlled by a
43 KingFriday013 : Yeah, I was going to mention that AA has had this for years, and it's always been free. I've never booked AA, but I LOVE that feature. It's a really
44 einsteinboricua : But 24 hours is just that: 24 hours. What if you need confirmation but can't find it? It would be ideal to lock in the price for just more than 24 ho
45 Grid : So does United have the same policy (did not see it on its website)?
46 474218 : Years ago you never paid a "fee" for making a reservation. You just called the airline (and a real person answered the phone) gave them your name and
47 Post contains images airbazar : I think you missed my point. What travel agents? I haven't seen a travel agent in years And most travel companies/consolidators use net fares. They d
48 Grid : Yes; I book a ticket with a few keystrokes, select my seat, then print my boarding pass at home, arrive 35 minutes before takeoff, and get on the pla
49 cgnnrw : Air France Europe offers this for €10,-- on flights within Europe and to/from North Africa & Israel and €15,-- for intercontinental flights. Y
50 474218 : I think you left out an important step ... paying for the ticket ... which now is done when you make the reservation, not when you use the reservatio
51 Grid : I incorporated that into the "book a ticket" step; I also left out turning on my computer, typing letters into a URL etc. I see the difference you me
52 swatpamike : From all Southwest Airlines employees, thanks Continental! Keep thinking up new fees. Cheers Mike
53 Grid : Southwest Airlines, you guys are so cute. I'd probably fly Southwest more if it made me free to move about the world.
54 Antoniemey : You can still find travel agents... They're not necessary for most modes of travel, but you'll see a lot of people using them to book cruises. As has
55 rampart : OK, explain how. To me, they're all travel industry. Travelers use hotels. Travelers use rental cars. I'm currently looking at car rental twice the p
56 flightopsguy : Yeah, but in the old days there was F, Y and sometimes K. No discounts. No upgrades. Roundtrip was double one way. My first ticket DCA-MCO on NA in 1
57 Tango-Bravo : For what the (potential) customer receives in exchange, these fees seem altogether reasonable to me...just enough to discourage customers from holdin
58 johruk : OK, gotta stand up for us Travel Agents here! Did you know as that any travel agent who might have half a brain would possibly hold a nett fare ticke
59 Post contains images cgnnrw : In my previous company we worked extensively with a very good travel agent and often their services were invaluable. E.g. back in the Summer of 06 or
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