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Contained & Uncontained Engine Failure  
User currently offlineTrickijedi From United States of America, joined May 2001, 3266 posts, RR: 4
Posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3327 times:

What's the difference between the two?




Its better to be on the ground wishing you were in the air than be in the air wishing you were on the ground. Fly safe!
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineN863DA From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 48 posts, RR: 5
Reply 1, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3285 times:

Basically, I believe that a contained engine failure is where the engine blows up (discs shatter etc.) but the parts stay containted within the engine cowling.
In an uncontained failure, the cowling merely becomes part of the shrapnel and everything goes wrong - everything flies off in numerous different directions.

FLYDELTA JETS and sail UNITED STATES LINES



N 8 6 3 D A


User currently offlineReggaebird From Jamaica, joined Nov 1999, 1176 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3279 times:

Contained - All broken pieces and projectiles stay within the damaged engine and/or its casing. Engines are designed to do this.

Uncontained - Broken pieces and other debris exits the damaged engine and/or its casing. This can be catastrophic if the debris enters the cabin, severs control lines or punctures fuel tanks.

Thornton


User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3276 times:

Contained : A big problem

Uncontained : A HUGE F***ING PROBLEM


User currently offline777gk From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1641 posts, RR: 18
Reply 4, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 3267 times:

Uncontained engine failures occur in about 1 in 300 of engine failures, and those odds are even better with newer, stronger engines. When an engine fails uncontained, it always will force the airplane to an abrupt stop or an unscheduled landing, and will almost always make news. Generally, the cowling will stay somewhat intact, with the fan blades fired out through slash-like holes. When these are thrown into the fuselage at such a high velocity, it will cause the cabin to rapidly decompress, and becomes a knife flying into the cabin, killing or severely injuring any passenger in its way. If it strikes a fuel line, it may cause a leak or complete fuel tank failure. In all cases, standard procedure is to shut down the engine ASAP, assess damage, shut down or reroute any systems affected by the damage, and divert to nearest suitable airport.

User currently offlineTrickijedi From United States of America, joined May 2001, 3266 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3248 times:

Thank you so much, very helpful info!!!

If you wanna get more detailed, please feel free. Thanks.



Its better to be on the ground wishing you were in the air than be in the air wishing you were on the ground. Fly safe!
User currently offlineTEDSKI From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 3239 times:

A good example of an uncontained engine failure was the UA Flt 232 DC-10 incident at Sioux City. The GE CF6 engine in the tail suffered an uncontained engine failure where parts of the engine severed the plane's 3 hydraulic lines.

User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13241 posts, RR: 77
Reply 7, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 3239 times:

Remember after the Air France Concorde crash, some of the immediate speculation that it might have been an uncontained engine failure? We knew it wasn't.
In 1981, a BA Concorde inbound to LHR suffered an engine failure at Mach 2, the cause turned out to be a one-off manufacturing fault in just that engine, the result was a fire so intense it literally cut the engine in two.
After an emergency landing in I think Shannon, after the cowlings were lowered, the engine was hanging there, two halfs dipping toward the decapitated centre.
The titainium between the engines had done their job, the aircraft was otherwise OK.
I've seen the pics, not got them to post unfortunately.



User currently offlineJkat From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 53 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 3223 times:

Wow uncontained engine failures are scary!! How many times does this usually happen in the US each year? Which planes have best/worst records of these types of engine failures?

User currently offlineTEDSKI From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 3216 times:

The DC-10 has had a number of uncontained engine failures involving the GE CF6. In the early 1970s a National Airlines DC-10 suffered an uncontained engine failure, where debris from the engine hit the fuselage and a passenger was sucked out. And last year two Continental DC-10s taking off from EWR suffered uncontained engine failures which almost caused a major accident to occur, but pilot skill brought the planes back safely.

User currently offlineTEDSKI From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 3198 times:

Last year a US Airways 767 on the ground was doing an engine test run when one of it's two GE CF6 engines came apart damaging the aircraft severely.

User currently offlineJkat From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 53 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3192 times:

That sucks! Im flying a DC-10-30 in a few weeks! What series of this plane has had those engine failures? -10?-30?

User currently offlineTEDSKI From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3176 times:

Yes, those two series of DC-10s are powered by GE CF6-50 series engines. Only the DC-10-40 series which NW and JAL are the only two airlines that operate it are powered by P&W JT9D engines.

User currently offlineTEDSKI From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3174 times:

In the late 80s, early 90s I believe, a Delta MD-80 suffered an uncontained engine failure from one of it's two P&W JT8D engines. Debris from the engine struck the fuselage killing two passengers.

User currently offlineJkat From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 53 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 3153 times:

So in these uncontained engine failures only a few passengers are injured/killed. Wouldn't there be rapid decompression? When was the last engine failure on a D13?

User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3704 posts, RR: 34
Reply 15, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 3149 times:
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TEDSKI

DC10-10's have CF6-6 engines.

Jkat

There is nothing wrong with the DC10, just enjoy the flight


User currently offlineTEDSKI From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3142 times:

It is funny the way you said that VC-10, about the DC-10 now being safe. It had to kill a few hundred people because of poor engineering defects in the DC-10's design to get into service first before Lockheed's L-1011.

User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3704 posts, RR: 34
Reply 17, posted (13 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3135 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

TEDSKI,

What has that got to do with flying on a DC10 today?


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