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Remembering Independence Air  
User currently offlineCODCA09 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 155 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 6726 times:

I was just reviewing an old Independence Air timetable (September 2004) and I was reminded of the insane levels of service they had to some places from IAD. 301 daily departures from IAD in total. The A319s hadn't arrived yet in this timetable, they came later in the year.

ORG DST Daily Flts
IAD ALB 7
IAD ATL 16
IAD BOS 16
IAD BUF 8
IAD BTV 5
IAD CHS 7
IAD CRW 6
IAD ORD 12
IAD CLE 9
IAD CAE 7
IAD CMH 8
IAD DAY 8
IAD DTW 8
IAD GSO 9
IAD GSP 8
IAD BDL 8
IAD IND 7
IAD JAX 7
IAD TYS 6
IAD LAN 7
IAD SDF 6
IAD MHT 9
IAD BNA 7
IAD JFK 17
IAD EWR 16
IAD ORF 8
IAD PIT 8
IAD PWM 6
IAD PVD 8
IAD RDU 14
IAD ROC 8
IAD SAV 6
IAD SWF 6
IAD SYR 8
IAD HPN 5

I always wondered why they didn't spread it around a little more and have fewer flights to each destination while adding more cities to the route map instead.   

56 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinewashingtonian From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 6728 times:

Quoting CODCA09 (Thread starter):
IAD JFK 17

Wowza. I remember flying this route for like $40 or something.


User currently offlineERJ170 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 6752 posts, RR: 17
Reply 2, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 6645 times:

Quoting CODCA09 (Thread starter):
I always wondered why they didn't spread it around a little more and have fewer flights to each destination while adding more cities to the route map instead.

I personally wondered why they didn't start multiple destinations from each city rather than all from IAD.. I mean, 14 from RDU? I would have did 7 to IAD, 2 to PVD, 2 to HPN, 2 BUF, 1 SYR.. but that's just me..



Aiming High and going far..
User currently offlineMAH4546 From Sweden, joined Jan 2001, 32596 posts, RR: 72
Reply 3, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 6625 times:

Quoting ERJ170 (Reply 2):
I personally wondered why they didn't start multiple destinations from each city rather than all from IAD.. I mean, 14 from RDU? I would have did 7 to IAD, 2 to PVD, 2 to HPN, 2 BUF, 1 SYR.. but that's just me..

I guess it wanted to last at least two years rather than just six months.



a.
User currently offlineERJ170 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 6752 posts, RR: 17
Reply 4, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 6609 times:

Quoting MAH4546 (Reply 3):
I guess it wanted to last at least two years rather than just six months.

Well, whatever the case, they are out of commission now.. so to have tried the IAD hub or the untested P2P routes doesn't mean a hill of beans now..



Aiming High and going far..
User currently offlineCODCA09 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 155 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 6595 times:

Quoting ERJ170 (Reply 2):

I personally wondered why they didn't start multiple destinations from each city rather than all from IAD.. I mean, 14 from RDU? I would have did 7 to IAD, 2 to PVD, 2 to HPN, 2 BUF, 1 SYR.. but that's just me..

Well HPN is slot controlled so the the 5 IAD-HPN flights is probably all FLYI could do there.

What I can't figure out is why they didn't fly a 3 or 4 flights a day from IAD to places like ILM, MYR, BHM, MEM, ROA, CAK, GRR, LEX, SCE, BGM, AVP, ABE, MDT & ACY. They could have made IAD one heck of a fortress hub with much longer list of destinations... that by the way would have helped feed their trancon A319s they started later in the year.


User currently offlinekevinmia27 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 18 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6533 times:

I Remember Independce Air and thinking this airline doesn't have a chace starting their hub a IAD. And unfortunatly, it didn't and folded. It was competing with all of the airlines/ market preference at DCA . And also the up-and coming BWI. IAD-Dulles is just too far and without moderate public transportation for domestic flights.

User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 883 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6501 times:

I worked at Indy. While it was a great place to work, most of us saw the writing on the wall and never understood how we could possibly be making money or even breaking even. $29 fare, the GLiDE pass, the empty aircraft, all meant I worried for my job until I finally got that furlough letter.

User currently offlinespinkid From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1094 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6482 times:

yeah, it was sad, since everyone saw that it wasn't going to work.

Glad I got to enjoy them from SWF-IAD-JAX at least once.


User currently offlineCODCA09 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 155 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6405 times:

Quoting ERJ170 (Reply 4):
Well, whatever the case, they are out of commission now.. so to have tried the IAD hub or the untested P2P routes doesn't mean a hill of beans now..

There was a P2P model that never flew?


User currently offlineERJ170 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 6752 posts, RR: 17
Reply 10, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6373 times:

Quoting CODCA09 (Reply 9):
There was a P2P model that never flew?

No, but they could have been trying some P2P routes.. but I guess ExpressJet didn't have success at that either..

but Independence Air started out in a Large Hub (UA at IAD) and then opened a focus city in another Large Hub (WN at MCO).. very good ideas..



Aiming High and going far..
User currently offlineF9Animal From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 4985 posts, RR: 28
Reply 11, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6341 times:

Quoting nws2002 (Reply 7):
I worked at Indy. While it was a great place to work, most of us saw the writing on the wall and never understood how we could possibly be making money or even breaking even. $29 fare, the GLiDE pass, the empty aircraft, all meant I worried for my job until I finally got that furlough letter.

It was sad to watch you guys fall down. I was standing on the sidelines cheering for Independence. I was hoping they would prove the nay sayers wrong. Sadly, I remember the last day. If we could turn back time!



I Am A Different Animal!!
User currently offlinePITrules From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 3123 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 6104 times:

Some facts about how Independence Air came about from an insider:

ACA had its United Express agreement canceled in United's bankruptcy court. The options were:

1) agree to (lower) terms with United, and/or a forced merger with MESA.
2) find another major airline to partner with
3) go it alone

ACA management made it clear that going at it alone was the riskiest. Contrary to A.net lore, ACA management were not the idiots made out to be on this enthusiast site. This was the same management group that made ACA one of the most successful regionals up to that point, to include an early RJ order, pioneering the first regional fee-per-departure agreements, and diversifying their operations by adding a second major airline partner (DL).

So why not go with #1 listed above? ACA was heavily invested in their home at IAD. While in BK, United publicly stated as part of their restructuring they were considering eliminating one of their 5 hubs, and that IAD was at the top of that elimination list. Where would that leave ACA?

#2 - Simply put, would there have been a guarantee that another major airline would pick up ACA? Management said maybe... maybe not.. do we take that chance? They shied away from that one. When AWAC went through the same process with UA, they found a partner with US Airways.

So go it alone it was, and we knew the risks. We had the wrong airplanes for that plan, and they knew it. Question was, can the fleet be updated fast enough? Where management failed was starting out with too many CRJs and not getting Airbuses fast enough. They figured they had enough cash reserves to make the transition, but the transition wasn't fast enough, combined with spiking fuel prices.

Meantime, DL canceled their contract with FLYi to operate 30 Do328s "Without Cause" - so Delta ended up eating the leases for all these aircraft. But it hurt FLYi non-the-less.

At the end, after massive losses, Independence Air had finally acquired 12 A-319s and reduced the CRJ fleet to 30. Load factors had finally built up, and the A-319s were redeployed from Transcon trips to operating IAD-LGA/BOS/CLT/PIT/MCO/TPA/SJU.

The final full month of operations, FLYi broke even, according to internal sources. Month by month financial info is not available, so I have no source to link. But the well was dry by then.

At one point during the span of FLYi, Richard Branson had made a proposal to turn Independence Air into what is now Virgin America. If ACA/FLYi management ever made a mistake, it was not leaving United, it was not shedding the CRJs fast enough, and/or the inability to agree to terms with Branson in this venture.

Otherwise, Independence Air offered a great product to the customers. In its only full year of operations, FLYi was the first to displace JetBlue from #1 in customer satisfaction surveys. As far as employees, it remains a very close knit family, and we have our reunion every year just like Braniff, Eastern, etc. There are very few of us that would trade in the short time at Independence Air for a lifetime of being a bottom feeder for United.

Quoting ERJ170 (Reply 2):
I personally wondered why they didn't start multiple destinations from each city rather than all from IAD.. I mean, 14 from RDU?

Before ACA pioneered the "fee-per-departure" agreement system in the airline business, the regional airlines operated on an at risk basis; they were responsible for their own reservations and revenue. When this was in effect in the early 1990's, ACA successfully operated a high frequency operation between IAD and RDU on the behalf of United Express. This was 14 daily flights. Based on this historical data, Independence Air figured it would be an equally large market for their operation.

Quoting CODCA09 (Reply 5):
What I can't figure out is why they didn't fly a 3 or 4 flights a day from IAD to places like ILM, MYR, BHM, MEM, ROA, CAK, GRR, LEX, SCE, BGM, AVP, ABE, MDT & ACY.

With the airplanes they had, they offered that amount of frequency to the larger markets; so why would these smaller markets have worked better?

Quoting kevinmia27 (Reply 6):
And unfortunatly, it didn't and folded. It was competing with all of the airlines/ market preference at DCA . And also the up-and coming BWI. IAD-Dulles is just too far and without moderate public transportation for domestic flights.
IAD was (and is) in the middle of the largest technology market on the east coast, as well as (at the time) the fastest growing population center in the east.

Quoting ERJ170 (Reply 10):
Quoting CODCA09 (Reply 9):
There was a P2P model that never flew?

No, but they could have been trying some P2P routes..

Yes, they tried p2p, from both TPA and MCO to places such as TYS, GSP, CAE, CHS, etc.

DL immediately added each and every route; the competition didn't work out well for FLYi.



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Photo © Rudy Chiarello


[Edited 2011-01-22 02:27:16]


FLYi
User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 5970 posts, RR: 14
Reply 13, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 6069 times:

Quoting PITrules (Reply 12):
Before ACA pioneered the "fee-per-departure" agreement system in the airline business, the regional airlines operated on an at risk basis; they were responsible for their own reservations and revenue.

ACA was formed in 1989, a full 5 years after FFD was first instituted between Delta and ASA. I guess you'd be right in that it's pioneering---despite the fact that someone had already set up a trail and townsites.



Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlinePITrules From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 3123 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 6046 times:

Quoting Goldenshield (Reply 13):
ACA was formed in 1989, a full 5 years after FFD was first instituted between Delta and ASA. I guess you'd be right in that it's pioneering---despite the fact that someone had already set up a trail and townsites.

The agreement ACA had was for a guaranteed profit margin of a certain percent, per departure. I believe the guaranteed profit margin is what made the ACA contract unique for its time.



FLYi
User currently offlineGoldenshield From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 5970 posts, RR: 14
Reply 15, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 6023 times:

Quoting PITrules (Reply 14):
The agreement ACA had was for a guaranteed profit margin of a certain percent, per departure. I believe the guaranteed profit margin is what made the ACA contract unique for its time.

Hmm. Makes sense. So instead of getting cost and then a bonus for performing well to make a profit, they got a profit just because. No wonder they were the highest paid regional when they left UAX.



Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun.
User currently offlinebhmdiversion From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 457 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 5930 times:

How can anyone forget "Happy Bags"??? I had some friends who worked there and said Indy paid you if your bag was missing? Is this right?

User currently offlinephatfarmlines From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1345 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 5806 times:

At TPA, there is a legacy left behind by DH, albeit not obvious to the layman's eyes. There are two lower-profile jetways in Airside C which were designed for DH CRJ operations at the time the new Airside C opened (Gates C42 & C43). F9 currently uses C43, and C42 is vacant, for now. I'd imagine C42 will be used by WN once FL moves over to Airside C.

User currently offlineCODCA09 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 155 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 5730 times:

Quoting PITrules (Reply 12):
Meantime, DL canceled their contract with FLYi to operate 30 Do328s "Without Cause" - so Delta ended up eating the leases for all these aircraft. But it hurt FLYi non-the-less.


Not to nitpick, but based on conversations I've had with former FLYI employees now at other carriers along with former Delta employees of the time, ACA's contract with Delta specifically prohibited ACA from operating aircraft larger than 70 seats on their operating certificate. When the first A319 was delivered ACA was in violation of their contract with Delta and it was subsequently terminated.

As for the FRJs, based on FLYI's financials they reported hefty retirement costs when the FRJs exited the fleet. Apparently paying penalties the lessor for early termination of the leases.

Now I'm not trying to point fingers I'm just following the logic here. No flaming please. Any responsible executive would have known this would happen after a quick review of the contract and would have accepted it as is if he wanted to take delivery of the A319. If FLYI management told their employees that Delta canceled the contract "without cause" they were being very untruthful with the employees. If they echoed this same message to investors then they committed fraud. Again I'm not trying to stir the plot here. I'm just playing the role of "investigative journalist" if you will. When you referred to the Delta contact being canceled "without cause" was that the official viewpoint communicated to employees by management or just an urban legend that grew over time?

Quoting F9Animal (Reply 11):
Otherwise, Independence Air offered a great product to the customers. In its only full year of operations, FLYi was the first to displace JetBlue from #1 in customer satisfaction surveys. As far as employees, it remains a very close knit family, and we have our reunion every year just like Braniff, Eastern, etc. There are very few of us that would trade in the short time at Independence Air for a lifetime of being a bottom feeder for United.


I agree with the great product.    I flew them several times and had a wonderful experience each time. In my opinion the fierce competition with UA at IAD brought the best out of every FLYI employee. As for the employee reunions, that's great you guys still get together.


User currently offlinePITrules From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 3123 posts, RR: 4
Reply 19, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 5464 times:

Quoting CODCA09 (Reply 18):
Not to nitpick, but based on conversations I've had with former FLYI employees now at other carriers along with former Delta employees of the time, ACA's contract with Delta specifically prohibited ACA from operating aircraft larger than 70 seats on their operating certificate. When the first A319 was delivered ACA was in violation of their contract with Delta and it was subsequently terminated.
Quoting CODCA09 (Reply 18):
Any responsible executive would have known this would happen after a quick review of the contract and would have accepted it as is if he wanted to take delivery of the A319. If FLYI management told their employees that Delta canceled the contract "without cause" they were being very untruthful with the employees. If they echoed this same message to investors then they committed fraud.

The FRJ's were flown by ACJet; a different operating certificate than ACA/FLYi. Its no different than Republic airlines flying A-319s as "Frontier", while using their other subsidiaries to fly regional jets to for their major airline partners while not violating those companies scope clauses. Based on having a seperate certificate, I think ACA had every reason to believe they would not violate any agreement with Delta., and yes, the term "without cause" was used repeatedly when discussing the termination of this agreement.

"The business models of the two companies are diverging, and the termination of the connection carrier agreement will allow each to take the path best suited for their company’s future,” said Fred Buttrell, president and CEO, Delta Connection Inc."

That seems like a nice way of saying "without cause". However, the next line:
“In addition, the termination will also ensure that we do not conflict with the Delta Air Lines pilot working agreement.”
Again I'm not sure why it would be a violation with a different operating certificate, so to use the term "fraud" when discussing ACA's role in this agreement I think is a stretch.

More than likely, Delta was not at all happy with the maintenance reliability and CASM of this aircraft, and this was a way to eliminate them.

Quoting CODCA09 (Reply 18):
As for the FRJs, based on FLYI's financials they reported hefty retirement costs when the FRJs exited the fleet. Apparently paying penalties the lessor for early termination of the leases.

I would like to see a link for this, as everything I've heard and seen it was Delta who was required to take the leases for these. It was in the contract that ACA could force DL to assume the leases for the Do328s if Delta canceled without cause. Pretty smart actually for ACA to insist that be in the contract.

"The 30 FRJ 328 aircraft currently flown by ACA are expected to remain in the Delta Connection carrier program, but will be operated by another carrier. Delta Connection is working to finalize the specifics of the program transition.

In other words, Delta assumed responsibility for those aircraft.

http://www.dlretiree.info/articles/dci_ends_aca_agreement.htm


"Atlantic Coast Airlines Holdings, Inc. (ACA) today announced it has received formal notification from Delta Air Lines that it will end its fee-per-departure agreement with ACA by invoking its right under the Delta Connection Agreement to terminate without cause upon 180 days notice"

"Under the terms of ACA's Delta Connection Agreement, if Delta terminates without cause, ACA has the right during the 180-day notification period to require Delta to assume the leases on some or all of the 30 328JET aircraft used in the company's Delta Connection operation"

http://goliath.ecnext.com/coms2/gi_0...lantic-Coast-Airlines-to-Exit.html

But back to the main subject, yes when ACA was making the case for Independence Air, they openly stated they expected to have ACJet continue with Delta, and as explained above, I'm not sure why that would be misleading.



FLYi
User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 883 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 5432 times:

Quoting PITrules (Reply 12):
The final full month of operations, FLYi broke even, according to internal sources. Month by month financial info is not available, so I have no source to link. But the well was dry by then.

I actually heard the same, as I was receiving my last paycheck.

Quoting CODCA09 (Reply 18):
Not to nitpick, but based on conversations I've had with former FLYI employees now at other carriers along with former Delta employees of the time, ACA's contract with Delta specifically prohibited ACA from operating aircraft larger than 70 seats on their operating certificate. When the first A319 was delivered ACA was in violation of their contract with Delta and it was subsequently terminated.

Originally we were told, "It's being worked out", which many assumed meant a new 121 cert for the FRJs, like ACJet was originally. In the end it was blamed on Delta, much the way other things were blamed on United.

Great place to work, great people to work with, but there were lots of issues, most starting with having way too many CRJs like PITrules pointed out. They were stuck with the aircraft leases, they had the employees so the the original plan was to use them until the A319s came onboard. The cash just didn't last long enough, and fuel prices didn't help either.


User currently offlineN809FR From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 182 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5185 times:

I really wish this airline had made it, heck I wish even Skybus had made it as there is just no variety in the US anymore. It's too bad there aren't any excited different airlines right now, and with UA going to the boring CO colors it makes it even worse.

Does anyone have any safety cards or anything similar left over from their A319 ops?


User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 883 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5089 times:

Quoting N809FR (Reply 21):
Does anyone have any safety cards or anything similar left over from their A319 ops?

I have a copy of both the regular and overwater cards for the A319. I can send you a scanned copy if you want, but I'm not willing to part with them.


User currently offlinemysterzip From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 167 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5011 times:

I miss Independence Air too, flew them out of JFK back in their first year of operation. Loved the product, the staff and the company.

User currently offlineN809FR From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 182 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 4991 times:

Quoting nws2002 (Reply 22):
I have a copy of both the regular and overwater cards for the A319. I can send you a scanned copy if you want, but I'm not willing to part with them.

Thank you, I would appreciate that. Much like Skybus I remember seeing Independence Air safety cards on ebay for absurd amounts of money for a piece of paper but still...


25 Post contains images mtnwest1979 : Only experience I had with DH was IAD-CRW and back to visit Charleston. Wandered around and caught an Alley Cats game. Ride was nice and so were FAs (
26 0NEWAIR0 : Their folding had more to do with the size of their aircraft rather than their hub selection. CRJ (or ERJ for that matter) dominated DISCOUNT airline
27 CODCA09 : Does anyone know if there is a place on the internet where one can hear the "Celebrity safety briefings" that Independence Air had? I know they had on
28 Post contains links nws2002 : www.ridgelines.org under Multimedia
29 Aloha717200 : I remember in this forum how everyone said this airline had no chance of surviving. And I remember really wanting them to succeed. I hoped that with t
30 CODCA09 : It wasn't just the a-netters, it was aviation finance Wall Street analysts, most airline executives, consultants, economists, and the list goes on. I
31 deltairlines : At the beginning, it was ACJet. However, that ended in the late 2003/early 2004 time frame, and the FRJs were all operated as part of ACA until ACA l
32 flyguy89 : What was their inflight product like on both their CRJ's and their A319's?
33 deltairlines : The CRJs were pretty much like any other CRJ out there. I recall the seats being a little more padded than what I am used to currently on the Delta C
34 nws2002 : Seats - typical economy leather in a very bright blue IFE - none on most flights, Digiplayers were rented to passengers on the longer A319 flights, t
35 flyguy89 : Thanks! sounds very nice. I remember flying on one of their FRJ's CAE-CVG back when they were still ACA...easily the nicest RJ flight I've ever had.
36 Post contains images PITrules : Who broke what? The ACJet certificate was alive and well until DL pulled the plug. Did you not read the news articles linked above? In addition to ho
37 movingtin : Delta had an out clause, "Without cause" with notice of 180 days, which they exercised. Why would Delta Continue a contract with a competitor?? Indy
38 CODCA09 : All the articles refer to Atlantic Coast Airlines (ACA), if the Delta Connection operation was ACJet, there would have been references as such. Furth
39 N766UA : I remember flying their inaugural CLE-IAD back in August of '04. The flight was pleasant and the crews were great! Then on the return a 20 minute thun
40 mcdu : This is some revisionist history. ACA was handed many UA routes after the 9/11 pull down by mainline. Their success was tied to timing versus any str
41 nws2002 : The ACJet certificate was gone by 2003, at least for Delta Connection operations. It might, heavy emphasis on the might, have been used for the Atlan
42 RedTailDTW : I still have a saved copy of the Cessation Letter that was published on their website: Today is a sad day for Independence Air. Today we must announce
43 CODCA09 : Based on the facts I've discovered and the conversations I've had with many former FLYI employees I totally agree. It almost appears cult like in tha
44 Post contains images enilria : The thing about customer service is that it's a lot easier to provide a good experience when there aren't a lot of customers. You'll find the days yo
45 nws2002 : If you didn't work there you have no idea how bad this "brainwashing" actually was. Everything bad was blamed on United in some form. Any criticism o
46 PITrules : No one has blamed Delta. The only thing I stated is that when plans for FLYi were formulated, they expected the DL Connection operation to continue,
47 CODCA09 : When the plans for A319s entering the fleet were formulated by ACA management they knew they would be in violation of Delta's Pliots contract, which
48 mcdu : Look back at the ACA stock. At one point in the early 90's it was trading at remarkably low prices. They were close to closing the doors. The rebound
49 GSPSPOT : Man, life was good at GSP when Indy was around! They really had a great product, but a crappy business model. So sad it just wasn't to be.
50 movingtin : See below, can't say it any better
51 GSPSPOT : Independence had a GREAT product. I suspect their own branded service was MARKEDLY different from what they provided as a contract carrier. Rather li
52 PITrules : In other words, the value of ACA increased during the 1990s. As far as donations, any regional could use that argument, but the fact remained ACA was
53 Post contains images Garpd : I did this for a friend who lost their job from the shutdown
54 0NEWAIR0 : Beautiful!
55 mcdu : Of course UA had a rumored merger with US and HP in the mid 90's. They absorbed PaAm pacific and Latin America routes. Heck they even had a merger wi
56 CODCA09 : Couldn't have said it better myself. On another note if we all wonder what ACA would look like today if they didn't start Independence Air and instea
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