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DCA Baggage Handler Gets Trapped In Cargo Hold  
User currently offlineKBUF From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 507 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 9771 times:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41493086/ns/travel-news/?ocid=twitter

At least he was able to get out before the E170 left for BDL. His co-worker should've been paying more attention, though.


"Starting today, the Buffalo Sabres' reason for existence will be to win a Stanley Cup."-Terry Pegula, February 22, 2011
44 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineFlexJetOKC From United States of America, joined Feb 2011, 54 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 9745 times:

Wow! That would of been fatal if no other action was taken. Correct me if I am wrong: the bins are NOT pressurized/heated. Glad to hear everything turned out okay.


Above the planet on a wing and a prayer, my grubby halo, a vapour trail in the empty air...
User currently offlineericaasen From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 230 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 9691 times:

Quoting FlexJetOKC (Reply 1):
Wow! That would of been fatal if no other action was taken. Correct me if I am wrong: the bins are NOT pressurized/heated. Glad to hear everything turned out okay.

He would've been all right, we put live animals in there all the time. The E-170's are usually loaded with the bags in the forward bin, which is heated and pressurized. On the other hand, it's not that big of a bin, obviously whoever closed the door didn't look inside or take the time to put the net up, since the guy in the bin should've had time to get out.


User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 10990 posts, RR: 52
Reply 3, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 9691 times:

Wow!

Is there any kind of training that people undergo for surviving something like that? I imagine that the bins are pressurized (since they're part of the fuselage) but not heated. Would burying yourself in the luggage save you?



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User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 9692 times:

Quoting FlexJetOKC (Reply 1):



Both bins are pressurized and temperature controlled so he would have been fine, but still...



What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlineKingAir200 From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1605 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 9431 times:

I really wonder how you'd miss the door being closed on you if you were in the bin. It's not like the 170 cargo doors close that fast. Especially if you're short and have to use that damn pole.


Hey Swifty
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6100 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 9349 times:

It's a short flight, he could have survived even without pressurization.


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineflyingalex From Germany, joined Jul 2010, 1013 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 9310 times:

Anyone want to take a guess for how many weeks will his colleague will have to buy the after-work drinks to make up for that one?  


Public service announcement: "It's" = "it is". To indicate posession, write "its." Looks wrong, but it's correct grammar
User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 8, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 8776 times:

Quoting KingAir200 (Reply 5):
I really wonder how you'd miss the door being closed on you if you were in the bin. It's not like the 170 cargo doors close that fast. Especially if you're short and have to use that damn pole.



Which leads me to believe he was probably asleep.



What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 29674 posts, RR: 84
Reply 9, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 8756 times:
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Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 8):
Which leads me to believe he was probably asleep.

He was evidently tasked to be the tug operator for the push back, so I am going to hazard a guess he was not asleep.

Also, because he would have been the one to push back the E170, his absence would have at least initially prevented the plane from departing since they would have started a head check and, finding him missing, I would think would have checked the hold - for security reasons if none other (i.e. - fear he'd placed an explosive device in the hold and then "beat feet" out of the area).


User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 8543 times:

Quoting Stitch (Reply 9):
He was evidently tasked to be the tug operator for the push back, so I am going to hazard a guess he was not asleep.

Also, because he would have been the one to push back the E170, his absence would have at least initially prevented the plane from departing since they would have started a head check and, finding him missing, I would think would have checked the hold - for security reasons if none other (i.e. - fear he'd placed an explosive device in the hold and then "beat feet" out of the area).



You've never worked the ramp then   . Just because he was to push the tug doesn't mean they wouldn't have pushed back without him or even do a "head-count" for security reasons. That doesn't happen on the ramp in the real world. Someone else would have gotten on the push back and got the plane out the gate. People disappear all the time, unfortunately. Again, the bin door closes by an actuator. It is NOT fast and you can hear it from inside the bin and from the outside. Number 2, the bins are not big at all. It's not like he's on a 738 in the back and didn't have enough time to yell out. Trust me when I say he was asleep. Either that or his eyes were closed and he was listening to his ipod.



What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlineericaasen From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 230 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 8395 times:

Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 10):
You've never worked the ramp then . Just because he was to push the tug doesn't mean they wouldn't have pushed back without him or even do a "head-count" for security reasons. That doesn't happen on the ramp in the real world. Someone else would have gotten on the push back and got the plane out the gate. People disappear all the time, unfortunately. Again, the bin door closes by an actuator. It is NOT fast and you can hear it from inside the bin and from the outside. Number 2, the bins are not big at all. It's not like he's on a 738 in the back and didn't have enough time to yell out. Trust me when I say he was asleep. Either that or his eyes were closed and he was listening to his ipod.

Agreed, heck someone else on the crew probably is capable to push back, most rampers can. And the door actually closes by hand. The guy had to be asleep and the guy closing the door probably didn't put the net up and just slammed the door shut. Although, he could've been asked to pull a bag and was bin diving looking for it and at night the guy just might've closed the door without looking in. We almost had a guy closed in a bin doing just that, he didn't know where the light switch was and was looking for a bag using a flashlight.


User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5428 posts, RR: 6
Reply 12, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 8178 times:

Quoting FlexJetOKC (Reply 1):
That would of been fatal if no other action was taken.
Quoting FlexJetOKC (Reply 1):
the bins are NOT pressurized/heated.

No offense, but you should really make sure you know what you're talking about before you post "facts".

1) It would NOT have been fatal.

2)The bins are pressurized on ALL aircraft, and I believe heated also on the 175s.

3) A quick glance at the similar topics at the bottom of the page reveals 3 previous incidents where the poor fella wasn't found, and had to suffer through the flight.

Quoting D L X (Reply 3):


Is there any kind of training that people undergo for surviving something like that?

No. It's certainly talked about, because it does happen, but no formal training is given. Pretty much just make noise, and if all else fails start digging through bags and putting on layers. This is how the B6 guy survived 2 years ago when he was shipped to BOS.

Quoting Stitch (Reply 9):
Also, because he would have been the one to push back the E170, his absence would have at least initially prevented the plane from departing since they would have started a head check and, finding him missing, I would think would have checked the hold - for security reasons if none other (i.e. - fear he'd placed an explosive device in the hold and then "beat feet" out of the area).

As said before, people go "missing" all the time for legitimate reasons. Plus, why would a person assigned to that flight have to "beat feet"? They already know he's been there, and a bomb theoretically wouldn't go off until the plane was in the air.



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 13, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 8104 times:

Quoting ericaasen (Reply 11):

I must be confusing he 170/175 with another a/c (they start to mesh together after a while). Granted, the last time I actually worked the ramp was around 2006. Back then I was "trained" on all connection a/c although I only worked the CR2s and 7s on a regular basis.

Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 12):
As said before, people go "missing" all the time for legitimate reasons.

And sometimes for not so good reasons  Like easing out to avoid work for a little while.



What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlineCody From United States of America, joined May 1999, 1930 posts, RR: 9
Reply 14, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 7692 times:

Slight correction and being a little nit-picky.........on the EMB 170/175, only the forward cargo bin is ventilated. The aft cargo bin is not. So if you want to get locked in either one, choose the forward one! The aft cargo bin is inside the pressure haul, but once you are locked up in there for a while, it will start to get a little stuffy.

User currently offlineloggat From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 666 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week ago) and read 7454 times:

Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 10):
Again, the bin door closes by an actuator

That's not true either.

The door is manual, no hydraulics. He wouldn't have heard anything until the latch closed behind him and it was all dark.



There are 3 types of people in this world, those that can count, and those that can't.
User currently offlinecle757 From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 1099 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week ago) and read 7197 times:

All he had to do is bang on the ceiling of the cargo bin, and the passengers would have heard him.


Cleveland the best location in the Nation
User currently offlineNWAdeicer From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 169 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (3 years 2 months 1 week ago) and read 7123 times:

Have to agree with the other posters here. I would care to wager a bet that the guy was getting a little shut eye, probably with an ipod.

That bin is small compared to some of the other bins, I am 6'04" and when I sit in that bin I still have to hunch over, one of the worst bins to work IMHO. The door is also a pain in the rear to open and close and depending on your height requires a metal "stick" that is located in a pouch on the inside of the door to the left to help unlock the handle and bring the door down.

As far as pushback drivers, pretty much everyone is qualified to pushback, sometimes someone will be designated to do it but usually it's whoever is out there when its time to go. And the thing about people disappearing, that happens everyday. During my shift I honestly couldn't tell you half the time where at least 6 of our crew of 8 are. Everyone knows when the next flight is expected and most head off to see friends, eat, people watch, etc. and are back in time for the arrival.



I miss the Red Tail
User currently offlineAndrewUber From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2528 posts, RR: 41
Reply 18, posted (3 years 2 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 6963 times:

Quoting cle757 (Reply 16):
All he had to do is bang on the ceiling of the cargo bin, and the passengers would have heard him.

Check out the news link. That's exactly what he did.



I'd rather shoot BAD_MOTIVE
User currently offlineUnited787 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2641 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (3 years 2 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 6666 times:

Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 12):
1) It would NOT have been fatal.

But what about the automatic baggage compactor? Wouldn't that have crushed him to death, of course, unless he found some sort of rod that would stop the bulkheads from closing in on him?


User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 20, posted (3 years 2 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 6615 times:

Quoting loggat (Reply 15):
That's not true either.

The door is manual, no hydraulics. He wouldn't have heard anything until the latch closed behind him and it was all dark.

As I pointed out here:

Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 13):
I must be confusing he 170/175 with another a/c (they start to mesh together after a while). Granted, the last time I actually worked the ramp was around 2006. Back then I was "trained" on all connection a/c although I only worked the CR2s and 7s on a regular basis.

But thanks 



What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlineswa4life From United States of America, joined Jul 2009, 380 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (3 years 2 months 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 6577 times:

Someone was taking a nap. I am not too sure about the E170 but on a 737 the bin door can be opened from both the outside AND inside.. It would also be consistent with why nobody on the outside noticed he was in there. He probably was jostled awake after the plane started moving. Bin napping is very common for ramp employees, as there are sometimes lulls and wait periods during the process of loading a plane.

User currently offlineflyingalex From Germany, joined Jul 2010, 1013 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (3 years 2 months 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 6269 times:

I think the iPod theory is a good one. With the music on loud enough, he wouldn't even have had to be napping for him not to hear the door being closed.

Quoting swa4life (Reply 21):
He probably was jostled awake after the plane started moving.

The aircraft hadn't started moving yet.



Public service announcement: "It's" = "it is". To indicate posession, write "its." Looks wrong, but it's correct grammar
User currently offlineContinental From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 5499 posts, RR: 19
Reply 23, posted (3 years 2 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 5578 times:

I'm aware that the bins are heated. But say hypothetically they are not heated. How cold could it get in the bins without heating if the flight was several hrs long and cruising at, say, FL350?

User currently offlineaa61hvy From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 13977 posts, RR: 57
Reply 24, posted (3 years 2 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 5578 times:

Happened on a flight I was on a while back. DFW-IAH on CO (MD-82). We heard pounding and screaming on the floor, but no one knew what to make of it. We started pushing back and the guy in the hold was screaming very loud. People in my section started to notice and look around. A FA walks up hears it, and just stomps on the floor and continues walking. We then told her someone is stuck in there. She notified the pilot, went back to the gate and he got out.


Go big or go home
25 Daleaholic : I seriously, seriously hope this is a sarcasm filled post!!! As others have said, it's likely he was getting a bit of much needed sleep... Then woke
26 flyingalex : I'm getting really tired of having to point this out, but for everyone who didn't read the article: The aircraft had not moved an inch.[Edited 2011-0
27 axelesgg : I wonder if he found some illegal immigrants...
28 Daleaholic : Chill out, all I got when I opened the link was a video...
29 flyingalex : The text is under the video if you scroll down. I like your signature by the way.
30 T5towbar : I can't figure out this episode. The bin is smaller than a Mad Dog bin. Plus, you have to put up the bin webbing before you use that pole to close the
31 N766UA : Yeah, that strikes me as very, very difficult. I worked in a lot of E170 bins, and they're cramped, ridiculous little spaces. I could see falling asl
32 Post contains links and images cx777 : It does happen... get a quick breather or listen to the ipod...
33 contrails15 : And we have a winner. Happened with us few years back. Not going into details but it was on a 190. Guy was passed out asleep but was alive a well whe
34 Post contains images United787 : Yes the reference was to Star Wars...
35 Post contains images jreuschl : Now if WN didn't have weight limits, we could have cargo passengers that fly free!
36 contrails15 : And they leave the light on.
37 Post contains images Maverick623 : JFK-BOS. It was all over the news. I'm guessing he's no longer employed with the company.
38 contrails15 : There is more to the story then what was on the news. He is not with the company, he actually ended up suing the company.
39 N766UA : I absolutely believe that. When you're working at 4AM every morning, you learn to sleep through some really noisy things in an airplane bin.
40 Post contains images copter808 : That's a possibility, but the "bin stretcher" would have saved him!
41 N766UA : That's assuming they had one. We lost ours all the time; we ran out of prop wash quite a bit, too. It's just so hard to keep that stuff readily avail
42 gr8circle : Considering how often these things happen, can't airlines just institute a procedure whereby anyone closing a cargo door just yells out a warning to
43 contrails15 : Very true and I'm guilty of it as my shift starts at 0430 BUT you have to be smart. I always tell my crew I'll be in the front or back belly. But how
44 KingAir200 : They could, but let's be honest. They shouldn't have to. If people would pay attention, this wouldn't happen.
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