Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Another UA 232 Question  
User currently offlineevanbu From United States of America, joined Mar 2009, 377 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 6 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 2210 times:

Recently I was reading about UA 232 on wikipedia. There is a map on the website (shown below) that indicates where the flight was located when the fan disc separated in the #2 engine. The flight was heading from DEN-ORD and the weather over Iowa that day was perfect, so it wasn't like it was deviating around any weather. My question is this; Why was the flight headed NNE (5 degrees) prior to the failure of the #2 engine? (Just northeast of Mapleton, Iowa according to the map)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/UA232map.png

Thanks for the response

3 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlineB6JFKH81 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2888 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (3 years 6 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 2152 times:

It was probably following a jetway. If you look at the area of the engine failure, it says that the intended rollout was supposed to be at 095 degrees, which makes me think that the flight got to an "intersection" for jetways. You have to remember, this was 1989...airspace was different back then and you weren't navigating your aircraft with GPS like today.


"If you do not learn from history, you are doomed to repeat it"
User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2825 posts, RR: 45
Reply 2, posted (3 years 6 months 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 2010 times:

Quoting evanbu (Thread starter):
My question is this; Why was the flight headed NNE (5 degrees) prior to the failure of the #2 engine?

Because we normally are on airways and routings other than a direct line between our origin and destination, and the routes have numerous turns in them to deconflict traffic from other traffic and various kinds of airspace.

Quoting B6JFKH81 (Reply 1):
You have to remember, this was 1989...airspace was different back then and you weren't navigating your aircraft with GPS like today.

We had inertial navigation long before 1989, and for enroute purposes an INS or IRS is fully capable of doing fix to fix, direct, and off-airway navigation. The UAL DC-10 fleet had INS installed at the time of the accident, but it's irrelevant to the accident how they were complying with their route clearance, just that they were. Despite the proliferation of GPS we are still generally on airway routings in the continental US, just like we were in 1989.


User currently onlineB6JFKH81 From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 2888 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (3 years 6 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 1918 times:

Quoting PGNCS (Reply 2):
We had inertial navigation long before 1989, and for enroute purposes an INS or IRS is fully capable of doing fix to fix, direct, and off-airway navigation.

Very true and understood. I didn't want to start going into the various forms of navigation and their capabilities in the general CivAv forum as things can get quite technical.  



"If you do not learn from history, you are doomed to repeat it"
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
After-Effects Of UA 232 posted Mon Nov 9 2009 17:34:04 by C5LOAD
UA/AA Question posted Tue Sep 1 2009 20:31:18 by Ckfred
20 Years Since UA 232 posted Sun Jul 19 2009 02:07:13 by WestWing
Quick UA Loads Question posted Thu Mar 19 2009 13:35:02 by TWA902fly
UA A320 Question posted Sun Feb 8 2009 19:23:53 by Boots00
UA Equipment Question posted Sun Feb 8 2009 00:30:19 by Jasp25
Another UA B744 Into Storage posted Mon Nov 3 2008 04:25:19 by QF744ER
LH UA Codeshare Question posted Tue Aug 26 2008 17:25:40 by Alphaomega
UA @ LHR Question.... posted Sun Nov 18 2007 11:22:59 by Sfuk
Another AA Update Question posted Fri Oct 19 2007 20:45:58 by JDAirCEO