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How Do They Do It?  
User currently offlineGunFighter 6 From Netherlands, joined Jan 2001, 404 posts, RR: 0
Posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1517 times:

Yesterday while reading my monthly issue of airliners world i started wondering something.

United Airlines is known to be an Airbus lover  Big thumbs up
they have a lot of those birds flying.
now here comes the question. e.g. The A319 is build in Hamburg if i am correct, well how do they get those A319's to the US ???

Do they fly the leg with more then one stop or what ???
what is the official procedure for this.

any help thanx in advance.

regards
G  Big thumbs up

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSaab2000 From Switzerland, joined Jun 2001, 1610 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1485 times:

Depending on the plane, most of the time they just fuel them up and fly them over. Of course, the 319 does not have the range to make it to Canada or the US non-stop. They probably stop in Iceland and Gander. Most planes have more fuel capacity than needed. When full-fuelled they should have an endurance of about 5+ hours.


smrtrthnu
User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1477 times:

The A319, depending on options, has a range of up to 3500 miles loaded. Without passengers, substantially farther. The CJ, basically a A319 with extra tanks, can fly up to 6500 miles.

If the plane cannot cross the ocean in one hop, it will make stops along the way. Rekyavik and Gander are common stops.

Charles



User currently offlineSlawko From Canada, joined May 1999, 3799 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 1473 times:

Actually the 319 could fly from England or even France to New Foundland, or Nova Scotia non stop, expecially with no people. and if they make a stop in Canada from Europe and then put the plane into service, like for example fly it from Hamburg to Paris, then Halifax and then send it to Toronto to operate a flight from Toronto to Denver they do not have to pay the huge import taxes on the airplane. But back to your first question, the plane is empty so it has a bit more range, and it makes stops along the way, but if it has to cross the pacific and can not make a stop along the way they fit the plane with extra fuel tanks inside the passenger cabin.


"Clive Beddoe says he favours competition, but his actions do not support that idea." Robert Milton - CEO Air Canada
User currently offlineTR From UK - England, joined May 2001, 953 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1452 times:

I read about the Airbus factory at Hamburg in the German magazine Aero. In this article it was stated that the "mini"-Airbusses tranfering to American customers used two different routings. Either with stops at Shannon and Gander or with a single stop in Iceland. The route is often specified by the airline which is taking delivery of the aircraft as their own crews might be in charge of the flight for pratice or testing.

You see the same procedure with "Baby"-Boeings headed for Europe and De Havilland / Bombardier.

Cheers
Thomas


User currently offlineHypermike From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 1001 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 1449 times:

If I'm not mistaken, the rules are different for a non-revenue flight. The ETOPS rules don't apply quite the same way.

User currently offlineSlawko From Canada, joined May 1999, 3799 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1427 times:

There is no ETOPS restriction on a non-rev, or ferry flight.


"Clive Beddoe says he favours competition, but his actions do not support that idea." Robert Milton - CEO Air Canada
User currently offlineAF007 From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1416 times:

Always wondered that...

User currently offlineHkgspotter1 From Hong Kong, joined Nov 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 1397 times:

There are A319's doing 5+ hour flights from coast to coast in the USA !!

User currently offlineAI744LR From Thailand, joined May 2001, 106 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (13 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 1369 times:

I have always wondered about the same thing. Being from Thailand, I had always wondered how the "baby boeing" 737s made it there (for Thai). Naturally, they couldn't have made it through the pacific. I guess they must have taken the Iceland route.

Nice topic!


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