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British Airways, The Old Emirates?  
User currently offlinemanfredj From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1132 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 14798 times:

When one thinks of the best, Emirates certainly comes to mind. With a tremendous A380 order in place, Emirates will be a presence to be reckoned with and all of it from one major hub.

I can't help but to be reminded of British Airways in the 90's. They were and still are the largest 747 operator and primarily from one major airport...two key similarities I'll take the speculation a bit further and predict Emirates will grow a bit too large too quickly and be in the same position British Airways is in in ten years time. No matter how you look at it, Emirates will have a huge amount of capacity to fill. That could be their Achilles heal.

There are cultural differences between the two airlines, however and as time goes by we may even see a (sadly) reduction in the amount of rules FA's must abide by at Emirates. Perhaps they will even have the power to strike in the future as well.

As a side note, Singapore will probably remain one of the best overall airlines simply because of a more conservative growth strategy and a more stable culture. I would love to hear your thoughts on these two different yet remarkably similar airlines.

What steps can Emirates take to ensure they don't have capacity issues in the future? Additionally, what can British Airways do to gain the strong position they held in the 1990's?

[Edited 2011-04-12 19:28:59]


757: The last of the best
35 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9187 posts, RR: 15
Reply 1, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 14702 times:

I am sure BA will order more than just 12 firm+9 options for the A380. They need more than this number

User currently offlineKFlyer From Sri Lanka, joined Mar 2007, 1226 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 14616 times:

Do not misunderstand EK's growth. It is relying on a strong foundation ie the network feed. This is why the 380s are needed, to continue the hub with three banks without congesting the airport - which could hinder the ability for faster connectivity. This was not so in BA's case.


The opinions above are solely my own and do not express those of my employers or clients.
User currently offlinenighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5157 posts, RR: 33
Reply 3, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 14105 times:

Quoting KFlyer (Reply 2):
Do not misunderstand EK's growth. It is relying on a strong foundation ie the network feed.

That is far from a strong foundation. EKs network is entirely dependend on transfers, there is very little O&D demand. Passengers are very price sensitive, so if one of their rivals was to set up a similar network, but undercut EK, then passengers will have no hesitation to switch.

this market could quite easily turn into a bloodbath in the next few decades, with yields dropping considerably. Unlike BA, Emirates dont have much O&D traffic to maintain thier yields, although this has been the plan all along to build up Dubai as a tourist and business destination. Emirates future is dependent on this succeeding.

[Edited 2011-04-13 01:03:12]


That'll teach you
User currently offlineBurkhard From Germany, joined Nov 2006, 4398 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 13966 times:

For an airline it is an advantage to be positioned in the middle between two growing economies or a stable economy and a fast growing one.

During the 50-80th this was an advantage for BA and AF and also KL to make their main business between the US and Europe, both growing after the WWII destruction.
This growth came to its natural limits beginning of the nineties, and airlines optimized for this market cannot grow fast, unless in hard competition against each other.
During the 90th until 2005, a fast growth of economy with the West was in the GIS area, LH could make use of this.
Today, growth is in China, SE Asia, India and South America, all of these with growth potential as big as Europe between 1960 and 1990. Airlines which are well placed for these top growth market can have significant growth. This applies to IB and TP, TK, the Gulf carriers, carriers in the mentioned regions mainly. It won't be long that the worlds biggest airlines no longer have their home in the US, but in India, China or maybe even in Malaysia.

If EK has a problem to fill its capacity, then it is due to traffic rights, not due to missing demand. They will not have problems to fill their A380 - but maybe to find a place where to waste rights with their small 773 and tiny A350.


User currently offlinesandyb123 From UK - Scotland, joined Oct 2007, 1110 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 13575 times:
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Quoting nighthawk (Reply 3):
Emirates future is dependent on this succeeding.

And Dubai's future success is somewhat dependent on EKs growing transport links to the region. Remember, Dubai has grown in 10 years faster than some western cities grew organically in 50 years. This is in no small part down to city planning on a vast scale, with EK very much part of it.

Quoting Burkhard (Reply 4):
but maybe to find a place where to waste rights with their small 773 and tiny A350.

Dubai airport is becoming something of a gridlock, however if the plans for Al Maktoum International Airport are completed as expected, capacity in the region will probably never be a problem. EK regional strategy depends on aircraft like the A350 and the A380 will service hub and high-capacity routes.

Quoting manfredj (Thread starter):
Additionally, what can British Airways do to gain the strong position they held in the 1990's?

BA relies for less on connecting traffic, I can't remember the exact statistic but a large % are O&D traffic in London.

Sandyb123



Member of the mile high club
User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 13563 times:

Quoting nighthawk (Reply 3):
That is far from a strong foundation. EKs network is entirely dependend on transfers, there is very little O&D demand. Passengers are very price sensitive, so if one of their rivals was to set up a similar network, but undercut EK, then passengers will have no hesitation to switch.

I completely disagree and would respectfully suggest you have little understanding of the situation, or aviation in general, and are seemingly relying on myth, guesswork and inuendo. EK is an extremely well managed airlines and which is based on very sound operatioinal/management principles. I can quite aaasure you EK passengers are far from being 'price sensitive' and, indeed, no more so than with any other airline.....so what exactly may I ask are you basing such definitive information on, plus believing that they do not have a strong foundation? On that particular note, any passenger will choose airlines based upon particular requirements at the time. Why do you think this seemigly only applies to EK?

Quoting manfredj (Thread starter):
When one thinks of the best, Emirates certainly comes to mind. With a tremendous A380 order in place, Emirates will be a presence to be reckoned with and all of it from one major hub.

I can't help but to be reminded of British Airways in the 90's. They were and still are the largest 747 operator and primarily from one major airport...two key similarities I'll take the speculation a bit further and predict Emirates will grow a bit too large too quickly and be in the same position British Airways is in in ten years time. No matter how you look at it, Emirates will have a huge amount of capacity to fill. That could be their Achilles heal.

There are cultural differences between the two airlines, however and as time goes by we may even see a (sadly) reduction in the amount of rules FA's must abide by at Emirates. Perhaps they will even have the power to strike in the future as well.

As a side note, Singapore will probably remain one of the best overall airlines simply because of a more conservative growth strategy and a more stable culture. I would love to hear your thoughts on these two different yet remarkably similar airlines.

What steps can Emirates take to ensure they don't have capacity issues in the future? Additionally, what can British Airways do to gain the strong position they held in the 1990's?

Sorry, but I'm somewhat sceptical of exactly what it is you are trying to ask. Of course there are cultural differences between EK and BA....one is British the other Middle Eastern. Quite a cultural difference indded so am curious why you are 'comparing' them, or for what purpose? You then bring in SQ as a 'side note'.......what exactly are you comparing, or even asking? The capacity issue of EK is absolutely no different from any similar hypothetical situation at any airline in the world


User currently offlineLondonCity From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2008, 1496 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 13425 times:

Quoting manfredj (Thread starter):
As a side note, Singapore will probably remain one of the best overall airlines simply because of a more conservative growth strategy and a more stable culture.

But if you look back at when SIA began operating in the 1970s then it too expanded agressively. Look at how quickly it grew its network to Europe and Australia. SIA seems to have become "conservative" since joining Star.

Quoting nighthawk (Reply 3):
EKs network is entirely dependend on transfers, there is very little O&D demand.

In some cases ex-UK/mainland Europe the percentage of passengers transferring in DXB can be as high as 70 per cent.

Quoting sandyb123 (Reply 5):
BA relies for less on connecting traffic, I can't remember the exact statistic but a large % are O&D traffic in London.

In the days of the ethnic tailfins BA used to carry more transfer pax via LHR than it does today.


User currently offlinejfk777 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 8391 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 13198 times:
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Quoting LondonCity (Reply 7):
But if you look back at when SIA began operating in the 1970s then it too expanded agressively. Look at how quickly it grew its network to Europe and Australia. SIA seems to have become "conservative" since joining Star.

There are only so many places for Singapore Airlines to expand to, there are places they got asked to leave to, did I say Canada. SQ covers Australia, Asia, and Europe very well so where do they expand ? It fly to Scotland, like Emirates, to EDI & GLA. Africa might over one or two destinations, Nairobi could be interesting, well travelled Asians will want to go on Safari at some point. NBO is the most important city in eastern Africa.

Brazil was just added to SQ route system to Sao Paulo via Barcelona. Buenos Aires could be added. IN the USA SQ flies to 4 cities, LAX, SFO, EWR, JFK & Houston. Chicago and Washington-Dulles are two Star alliance hubs Singapore could expand too.


User currently offline777way From Pakistan, joined Dec 2005, 5762 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 13163 times:

Quoting jfk777 (Reply 8):
there are places they got asked to leave to

Only one destination, dont try to make it appear as something else.


User currently offlineshankly From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 1544 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 13119 times:

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 6):
You then bring in SQ as a 'side note'.......


Actually SQ is the better comparison to EK rather than BA.

Both are single city nations which realised they had geographically important locations which could be used to funnel through airline pax and thus create what was then a new airline concept

Both tapped into a cultural identity which was very attractive to global passengers...The Singapore Girl of course and with EK its about the best of "Arabian culture"...wealth, beauty, history, mystique

Both benefited from very smart management teams who raised the bar in terms of efficiency, comfort and value.

They also benefited by having sloth like competitors, largely former European state runs that thought their subsidies, protected slots, loyal pax and status would live forever and US has beens who never made the transition through deregulation from the golden age of the 50's and 60's

Both also were fortuitous in having the right equipment available to support their growth...SQ with the 747 and EK the A380, although I actually believe it is the 77W that will perhaps turn out to be EK's most important jet



L1011 - P F M
User currently offlinesteve6666 From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2003, 411 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 13090 times:

I would have thought the fundamental point is that Emirates will have a much lower cost structure than BA in the 1990s - making long term undercutting and erosion of markets by alternative airlines an implausible strategy.

In addition, Emirates has a much more flexible labour force than BA, and is not constrained by European labour laws.

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 6):
I can quite aaasure you EK passengers are far from being 'price sensitive' and, indeed, no more so than with any other airline.....so what exactly may I ask are you basing such definitive information on

A very large number of their passengers are migrant workers from the subcontinent, who are incredibly price sensitive. Try negotiating on price with an Indian (no offence) - it ain't fun. Which is largely irrelevant if Emirates has the lowest cost structure anyway.



eu nasci ha dez mil anos atras, e nao tem nada nesse mundo que eu nao saiba demais
User currently offlineshankly From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 1544 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 13047 times:

Quoting steve6666 (Reply 11):
A very large number of their passengers are migrant workers from the subcontinent, who are incredibly price sensitive. Try negotiating on price with an Indian (no offence) - it ain't fun

I am price sensitive and I fly Business Class! The whole world is price sensitive unless you own a G550



L1011 - P F M
User currently offlineLondonCity From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2008, 1496 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 13017 times:

Quoting shankly (Reply 10):
Both are single city nations which realised they had geographically important locations which could be used to funnel through airline pax and thus create what was then a new airline concept

What has benefitted EK more than SQ over the past decade is the changing patterns of world travel and trade. When EK was founded in the mid-1980s both China, India and South America were very different places than they are today.

EK and DXB now find themselves well located to tap the increasing volume of travel and trade between, say, India and N America and, say, between China and Africa. Just look at the number of points served by EK in the US and Africa compared with a few years ago.


User currently offlinejfk777 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 8391 posts, RR: 7
Reply 14, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 12446 times:
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Quoting 777way (Reply 9):
Only one destination, dont try to make it appear as something else.
Quoting jfk777 (Reply 8):
There are only so many places for Singapore Airlines to expand to, there are places they got asked to leave to, did I say Canada

IF you quote me. please do the full sentence, I did say CANADA.


User currently offlinemanfredj From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1132 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 11923 times:

Quoting nighthawk (Reply 3):
this market could quite easily turn into a bloodbath in the next few decades, with yields dropping considerably


A valid point, but how much control does EK have in limiting traffic from other carriers in their region? I think you are correct, if the economy continues to deteriorate and oil prices rise even more, EK could fall under hard time.

Quoting Burkhard (Reply 4):
It won't be long that the worlds biggest airlines no longer have their home in the US, but in India, China or maybe even in Malaysia.


This sounds about right. However, the US airlines that benefit from an already strong route structure could easily take advantage of this growth.

Quoting Burkhard (Reply 4):
If EK has a problem to fill its capacity, then it is due to traffic rights, not due to missing demand. They will not have problems to fill their A380 - but maybe to find a place where to waste rights with their small 773 and tiny A350.


How does the old saying go, "putting all your eggs in one basket?" I don't agree having a large fleet of 380's is the only way to go. The 777's are the right approach...the bottom line is you cannot predict future capacity needs. It's much better to have too little than too much.

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 6):
I can quite aaasure you EK passengers are far from being 'price sensitive' and, indeed, no more so than with any other airline.....so what exactly may I ask are you basing such definitive information on


Every person of every race, culture, and financial background is price sensitive. People don't get wealthy by spending their money without regard to price. Just because someone can afford a first class fare does not mean they didn't go shopping around for the best price. EK would be severely underestimating its customers if it believed it could go on indefinitely with such large "luxury" growth. This is a huge point in that eventually markets always change because economies always change. If your not ready for it, it comes back to bite you.

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 6):
Of course there are cultural differences between EK and BA....one is British the other Middle Eastern.


And you honestly think that's the extent of it? Imagine trying to conform a British Airways flight attendant to EK's standards/rules....that's my point. These things matter. EK doesn't have to worry about monthly strikes at their airline.

Quoting shankly (Reply 10):
Actually SQ is the better comparison to EK rather than BA.

Both are single city nations which realised they had geographically important locations which could be used to funnel through airline pax and thus create what was then a new airline concept

Both tapped into a cultural identity which was very attractive to global passengers...The Singapore Girl of course and with EK its about the best of "Arabian culture"...wealth, beauty, history, mystique


Interesting. In those ways they are very similar. I just saw the growth BA had in the 80/90's in their large 747 fleets, combined with one main hub and an almost "specialized" growth and naturally thought of EK. EK to me, is the British Airways of the 2010's.

Quoting steve6666 (Reply 11):
In addition, Emirates has a much more flexible labour force than BA, and is not constrained by European labour laws.


Exaclty. But what may be their biggest assett may also be their biggest downfall. Exactly how much does Emirates control their down market? Do they own the airport? How about fuel costs? What if Emirates had to pay what Europrean carriers do for their oil?

Emirates benefits from having huge financial resources from its own region. For the time being, it can see unparalleed growth. My point is, it should also be very careful to consider future market trends. Having the largest, newest most expensive fleet or airplanes in the world does you no good if nobody can afford to or wants to fly to your country.



757: The last of the best
User currently offlinerdh3e From United States of America, joined Mar 2011, 1690 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 11818 times:

Quoting jfk777 (Reply 14):
IF you quote me. please do the full sentence, I did say CANADA.

Not to stir the pot, but you did say "placeS" plural.   but that could also still be interpreted both ways, as there are multiple "places", but it's only one country.


User currently offlineOyKIE From Norway, joined Jan 2006, 2754 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 10115 times:

Quoting sandyb123 (Reply 5):

Dubai airport is becoming something of a gridlock, however if the plans for Al Maktoum International Airport are completed as expected, capacity in the region will probably never be a problem. EK regional strategy depends on aircraft like the A350 and the A380 will service hub and high-capacity routes.

I think this is one of the most important differences between BA and EK. LHR is a very restricted airport, and has been for some time. If LHR where allowed to expand more naturally, then IBA could continue to grow more profitably. How can BA grow, when flying primarly out of LHR?

The plane stupid group, and Eco-European politics are destroying European airlines!



Dream no small dream; it lacks magic. Dream large, then go make that dream real - Donald Douglas
User currently offlineshankly From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 1544 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 9920 times:

Quoting LondonCity (Reply 13):
EK and DXB now find themselves well located to tap the increasing volume of travel and trade between, say, India and N America and, say, between China and Africa. Just look at the number of points served by EK in the US and Africa compared with a few years ago


Totally agree and appreciate you expanding on my point

My first flight with EK was way back in 1994, en-route to Sri Lanka. Aircraft were A310's!. Since then I have used them and QR regularly when routing East out of London...my next flight with them is to KUL.

The game changer for me however was using them to Cape Town for the first time in 2009. Its now become my normal routing. I don't even look at the direct flights as I know EK will stuff the fares of BA, SA and VS...and I get a chauffeur pick up and two rides on the A380!



L1011 - P F M
User currently offlinencfc99 From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 741 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 9860 times:

Quoting manfredj (Reply 15):
What if Emirates had to pay what Europrean carriers do for their oil?

They do. If you have evidence otherwise, i would love to see it.


User currently offlineairbusfanyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2002, 1434 posts, RR: 25
Reply 20, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 7873 times:

Quoting jfk777 (Reply 8):
There are only so many places for Singapore Airlines to expand to, there are places they got asked to leave to, did I say Canada.

SQ/Singapore objected to AC flying YYZ-LHR-BOM-SIN and AC/Canada retaliated on SQ's SIN-VIE-YYZ route.
SQ served Canada (YVR) until 2007 when ironically the new Singapore-Canada bilateral was signed allowing SQ to fly non-stop (or via TPE) from Singapore to ANY point in Canada , with no restriction in frequency, or capacity.

But don't let the facts get in the way of a good rant.  

Cheers,
Kaz

Now back to BA and EK...



t.dot photography
User currently offlinejfk777 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 8391 posts, RR: 7
Reply 21, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 7518 times:
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Quoting airbusfanyyz (Reply 20):
SQ/Singapore objected to AC flying YYZ-LHR-BOM-SIN and AC/Canada retaliated on SQ's SIN-VIE-YYZ route.
SQ served Canada (YVR) until 2007 when ironically the new Singapore-Canada bilateral was signed allowing SQ to fly non-stop (or via TPE) from Singapore to ANY point in Canada , with no restriction in frequency, or capacity.

But don't let the facts get in the way of a good rant.

How aout this fact, KAZ,


Since both Air Canada and Singapore Air lines are Star Alliance meebers why can't they fly fro SIN to YVR daily code- sharing. Its better for both airlines or one to fly between the two countries then none.


User currently offlineaviator23 From Pakistan, joined Jan 2010, 24 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 6231 times:

Quoting manfredj (Reply 15):
This sounds about right. However, the US airlines that benefit from an already strong route structure could easily take advantage of this growth.

couldn't agree more

Quoting Burkhard (Reply 4):
It won't be long that the worlds biggest airlines no longer have their home in the US, but in India, China or maybe even in Malaysia.

agree and disagree at the same time...don't forget UA/DL/AA are amongst the largest airlines not just because of their international routes/networks but to a large part because of their domestic market. China and India definitely have the potential and capacity to match that but the existing infrastructure that the US enjoys and the popularity of air travel as a means of transportation in US are important factors in favor of US carriers.


User currently offlineAFGMEL From Australia, joined Jul 2007, 744 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 5494 times:

EK are certainly not the cheapest on the Kangaroo route. EY are even more expensive. Having said that, if I wanted to go to Europe EK would far and away offer the best direct connections. In comparison I would have to fly to LHR, AMS, FRA, possibly flying past the place I wanted to go.


B 727-44/200 732/3/4/8/9 767-3 742/3/4, 772/3, A319/20/21 332/333 342/3 , DC3/4/10, F28/50/100, ATR72
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25473 posts, RR: 22
Reply 24, posted (3 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 5300 times:

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 6):
Quoting nighthawk (Reply 3):
That is far from a strong foundation. EKs network is entirely dependend on transfers, there is very little O&D demand. Passengers are very price sensitive, so if one of their rivals was to set up a similar network, but undercut EK, then passengers will have no hesitation to switch.

I completely disagree and would respectfully suggest you have little understanding of the situation, or aviation in general, and are seemingly relying on myth, guesswork and inuendo. EK is an extremely well managed airlines and which is based on very sound operatioinal/management principles. I can quite aaasure you EK passengers are far from being 'price sensitive' and, indeed, no more so than with any other airline.

I think nighthawk's point (which I fully agree with) is that a carrier with a hub that relies so heavily on connecting traffic is much more sensitiive to competition than a carrier with strong O&D traffic at their hub (e.g. BA at LHR to cite one obvious example). Connecting traffic through a hub is almost always lower yield and more price-sensitive than O&D traffic to/from the hub itself. That's why fares from the same point to a hub are often higher than fares connecting through that hub to more distant points. That's because there's much more competition by alternate connecting routings to such points, and the carrier can offer a better nonstop product to/from their hub itself, which normally can command higher fares.

If they don't have a high volume of O&D traffic to/from their hub, they're more at the mercy of current and any new competitors that may surface than a carrier like BA with such a strong O&D market at their home base.


25 Post contains images airbusfanyyz : fact /fakt/Noun 1. A thing that is indisputably true. The only fact in your post is that AC and SQ are both part of Star Alliance. The rest is your op
26 Quokka : While EK's passengers, like passengers of other airlines, are price conscious it does not always follow that they will book EK because they are the ch
27 nighthawk : Many subsequent posters seem to agree with me. My comment was not related to EKs management, but rather their business plan. An airline who's primary
28 AFGMEL : Possibly, but they are not competing with EK whose connections to Asia and Oceania are much better. No, but the example above it would be worth it if
29 cws818 : Well, as they say, there is a first time for everything.
30 mariner : No, sir, not with me, nor many of my friends. We all "bachelors" (LOL) we all travel mostly long haul, we are all very experienced travelers and it c
31 Eightball : In terms of traveling between the U.S. and Saudi Arabia, I've tried three airlines in the past few years: EK, QR and SV. In terms of connection times
32 Burkhard : Building up of infrastructure determines when, not if as example AirAsia bypasses Southwest. Only if Aisa builds up powerful railway systems, and US
33 directorguy : Keep in mind that although EK's 'transfer pax' demographic is price elastic, O&D EK fares starting/ending in DXB are pretty high. Just as EK under
34 Post contains links SSPhoenix : I'm on a quick break so all I'm going to do is give you lot a quick analysis: Here is the show of power from BA during their reign of power: http://ww
35 yenne09 : The future of aviation is now in Asia and Africa so that Europe and North America are unable to sustain the growth of aviation in those parts of the
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