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What's The Latest With Peanuts Ban?  
User currently offlinegoblin211 From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 1209 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 7159 times:

I was watching the tv show, Millionaire and they asked a question about airlines "beginning to remove peanuts from flights due to passengers with allergies". Did all airlines remove them from their flights for the severely allergic or did only a few of them? I know AA didn't serve any when I flew them a week ago. Also, why did they even serve them in the first place? What made peanuts so desirable to serve on flights anyway? Not that they aren't good.


From the airport with love
53 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAusA380 From Australia, joined Jan 2009, 310 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 7152 times:

I hope they put an alternative on planes. I am a celiac (Gluten Free) and the alternative always seems to be a gluten based snack! Thinking airlines do find a good middle ground - but there are few of them.

User currently onlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21515 posts, RR: 55
Reply 2, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 7128 times:

Quoting goblin211 (Thread starter):
Also, why did they even serve them in the first place? What made peanuts so desirable to serve on flights anyway?

Because they're tastier than most of the alternatives. I like the potato chips that B6 offers, and the cookies that you get on DL or FL (and perhaps some other airlines - those are the only two carriers I've flown of late), but other than that, I'd much rather have peanuts (and I'd probably prefer peanuts over the cookies).

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlinepeanuts From Netherlands, joined Dec 2009, 1438 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 6979 times:

The latest with Peanuts ban???

I'm not aware of anything...   


Quoting goblin211 (Thread starter):
beginning to remove peanuts from flights due to passengers with allergies

Just wrong...

Quoting AusA380 (Reply 1):
I hope they put an alternative on planes

I feel discriminated against...

Quoting Mir (Reply 2):

Because they're tastier than most of the alternatives

Now you're talking!!!  

PLEASE DON"T BAN ME!!!
Just start your own allergen free, gluten free, cholesterol free, fat free, hay fever free, any disease free, smelly people free, baby free airline somewhere else and call it a day, please...

[Edited 2011-04-14 20:40:58]


Question Conventional Wisdom. While not all commonly held beliefs are wrong…all should be questioned.
User currently offlineZkpilot From New Zealand, joined Mar 2006, 4802 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 6941 times:

Quoting goblin211 (Thread starter):
Also, why did they even serve them in the first place? What made peanuts so desirable to serve on flights anyway? Not that they aren't good.

They were probably served as they were cheap, easy, convenient, tasty, and people are used to bar snacks.
Removed obviously for those with allergies. It costs a lot to divert a plane because someone is going into anaphylactic shock and is a PITA, just easier to serve an alternative (even though peanuts are awesome and I miss them onboard).



56 types. 38 countries. 24 airlines.
User currently offlinejwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 19
Reply 5, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 6917 times:

If we start banning everything that someone, somewhere, at some point doesn't like, want, or is allergic to, we should just ban everything.

And sadly in the current politically correct, littigation prone, society that's exactly what's happening.



I wish I were flying
User currently offlineFlaps From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 1258 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 6906 times:

And what happens when a passenger brings peanuts aboard?

User currently offlineHPRamper From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4036 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 6905 times:

It has nothing to do with being politically correct. Peanut allergies are different than most allergies in that they are so dangerous death may very well occur even from a minute exposure. Most allergies result in irritation or maybe a rash, sneezing, etc. With peanuts...a microscopic amount kills those affected. I liked the peanuts too - used to practically live on them when I was a poor starving ramper cleaning the planes - but the cookies and pretzels you can get now only irritate the gluten- and wheat-allergic people...who probably aren't going to die, in any case.

User currently offlineCXB77L From Australia, joined Feb 2009, 2596 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 6884 times:
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Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 4):
Removed obviously for those with allergies. It costs a lot to divert a plane because someone is going into anaphylactic shock and is a PITA, just easier to serve an alternative (even though peanuts are awesome and I miss them onboard).

Just put a disclaimer in big, bold, 20-point font red letters before anyone pays for the ticket, saying that they do not guarantee an allergy-free environment, and that passengers with allergies must take their own precautionary measures (an EPIpen, for instance).

People are allergic to lots of things these days, and if things like this continue, we'd all be flying in sterilised tubes and be forced to wear scrubs.



Boeing 777 fanboy
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25004 posts, RR: 85
Reply 9, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 6845 times:
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Quoting HPRamper (Reply 7):
Peanut allergies are different than most allergies in that they are so dangerous death may very well occur even from a minute exposure.

So what happens to someone in - say - Indonesia, where peanut sauce is everywhere. Any satay stand in any market place will have peanut sauce, as will just about any restaurant or cafe. And it isn't just satay - Indonesian salad has a peanut dressing. Peanuts are used throughout the cooking and in other Asian countries.

Do Indonesians not have peanut allergies?

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlinegenybustrvlr From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 261 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 6844 times:

As far as I know, ban is not the correct categorization. Airlines have made business decisions to remove peanuts from flights - which is fine with me. When an airline or the government tries to tell me that I cannot bring my own peanuts on board, then, I'll be angry and intentionally break the rule. Until then, I'll carry something tastier onboard.

User currently offlinebrenintw From Taiwan, joined Jul 2006, 1610 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 6760 times:

Quoting mariner (Reply 9):
So what happens to someone in - say - Indonesia, where peanut sauce is everywhere

Mariner,

My cousin is highly allergic to nuts, sesame and soy -- three staples in Chinese cooking. When she came to Taiwan, we managed (albeit with some challenges) to eat out the two days I spent with her -- with no fatal side effects. My standard question before we went anywhere was: "Got your epipen?"

Now, to give you an example of her allergy -- she cannot eat breakfast cereal due to the trace amounts of peanut residue in it.

But to answer your other question:

Quoting mariner (Reply 9):
Do Indonesians not have peanut allergies?

I can't talk for Indonesia, but I can tell you that peanut, sesame and soy allergies are very rare in Taiwan -- to the point that we were accused of "just saying that because you don't like the sauce" when I asked a server to leave the sauce off vegetables (I wasn't sure the sauce was free of soy).



I'm tired of the A vs. B sniping. Neither make planes that shed wings randomly!
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25004 posts, RR: 85
Reply 12, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 6758 times:
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Quoting brenintw (Reply 11):
I can't talk for Indonesia, but I can tell you that peanut, sesame and soy allergies are very rare in Taiwan -- to the point that we were accused of "just saying that because you don't like the sauce" when I asked a server to leave the sauce off vegetables (I wasn't sure the sauce was free of soy).

So - given that peanuts are a staple of a lot of African cooking, too, are we to assume peanut allergy is a western thing?

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlinebrenintw From Taiwan, joined Jul 2006, 1610 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 6739 times:

Mariner,

I think peanut allergies are a Western thing.

However, having said that -- both my cousin and I are from South Africa, but of European extraction.

OTOH, in most Asian and African countries, it's entirely possible that food allergies kill a large number of children before the allergy can be diagnosed. In many countries in the regions, good medical care is hours, if not days, away.

Anaphylactic shock can kill within minutes.



I'm tired of the A vs. B sniping. Neither make planes that shed wings randomly!
User currently offlineAsiaflyer From Singapore, joined May 2007, 1125 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 6739 times:

Quoting jwenting (Reply 5):
If we start banning everything that someone, somewhere, at some point doesn't like, want, or is allergic to, we should just ban everything.

And sadly in the current politically correct, littigation prone, society that's exactly what's happening.


As HPRamper says, peanut allergy can be much more severe than most other allergies.
A diversion may not be fast enough to save affected peoples life.
This itself should be enough for normal humble people to understand that airplanes always should be peanut free.

I love peanuts myself, but spend enough time on ground to eat the peanuts I want, without craving them in the air and causing other people danger.  



SQ,MI,MH,CX,KA,CA,CZ,MU,KE,OZ,QF,NZ,FD,JQ,3K,5J,IT,AI,IC,QR,SK,LF,KL,AF,LH,LX,OS,SR,BA,SN,FR,WF,1I,5T,VZ,VX,AC,NW,UA,US,
User currently offlinemariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25004 posts, RR: 85
Reply 15, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 6716 times:
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Quoting brenintw (Reply 13):
Anaphylactic shock can kill within minutes.

I'm aware of it, I have experienced it, I am allergic to a certain prescription medicine. I wouldn't wish it on anyone.

There are diseases that are (mostly) race specific, but only specific to certain geographic/cultural branches of the race. Ashkenazi (European) Jews are much more prone to Tay-Sachs than Sephardic/Oriental Jews.

So I am wondering if the same is true with these allergies.

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlinebrenintw From Taiwan, joined Jul 2006, 1610 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 6691 times:

Quoting mariner (Reply 15):
There are diseases that are (mostly) race specific, but only specific to certain geographic/cultural branches of the race. Ashkenazi (European) Jews are much more prone to Tay-Sachs than Sephardic/Oriental Jews.

However, those are mostly genetic diseases. Allergies, while they may be genetically influenced, are not strictly genetic.

For example, my cousin's daughter shares her allergies, but her sons don't; my brother is/was* highly allergic to beestings while nobody else in my family is.

Allergies are much more complex than "simple" genetics.

* I add the "was" here because he underwent desensitization treatment. I'm not sure if he's been stung in the years since he completed the treatment.



I'm tired of the A vs. B sniping. Neither make planes that shed wings randomly!
User currently offlineVee1rot8 From United States of America, joined Apr 2011, 14 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 6606 times:
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I realize how bad people with peanut allergies are affected by the mere presence of peanuts, my daughters school just recently banned all peanut snacks from the cafeteria and are encouraging parents to not allow children to bring anything into the school with peanuts in it, but it does seem to me that this allergy has grown tremendously somewhat recently. I cant help but think that it has something to do with the "lets get healthy" craze that has overcome us since people started switching from butter to margarine around the late 70's. Thats when parents really began to get obsessed with "dont eat this" and "dont eat that", and "not on MY table". I cant tell you how many of my friends who were brought up "healthy" are in worse shape than my butter, whole milk, salt, white bread raised self. Anyway, I can see a whole lot of liability for any airline that uses anything that could reasonably result in triggering an allergic reaction in anyone. Some people are so sensitive that the trace amounts on the packaging can cause a reaction. Its just the world we live in now.


10 minutes from KFRG
User currently offlinedstc47 From Ireland, joined Sep 1999, 1462 posts, RR: 3
Reply 18, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 6542 times:

Changing the subject somewhat, what about avoidance of "Flash photography" on AVOD systems?.

While it has become fashionable to preface TV news reports with "The following report contains flash photography"
because a really tiny percentage of the population is hypersensitive to camera flashes, (As if most interior news conferences do not have some flash shots and such could be expected),I do not recall if any airline screens for use of flash on AVOD, in either news reports or conventional movies.


User currently offlinerobffm2 From Germany, joined Dec 2006, 1115 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 6398 times:

Quoting mariner (Reply 12):
is a western thing?

It's not a western thing. It's a U.S. thing.


User currently offlinegoblin211 From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 1209 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 5986 times:

Quoting CXB77L (Reply 8):

I like your idea. I'm surprised they didn't do that before, after all, busineses always have disclaimers and don't hold themselves accountable for stuff anyway. Has there been any documented medical diversion due to peanut allergies/any others?



From the airport with love
User currently offlineViper911 From Russia, joined Oct 2005, 264 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 5862 times:

They removed the peanuts because some people have allergic reactions to them? i don't know about you guys, but i think that if you deliberately eat peanuts knowing it will harm you, you're either stupid or suicidal. I could understand if it was a nut powder or something like this mixed in some other food where you can't see it, yea that could be a descent reason to remove such product but it's peanuts for god sakes you can't be fooled here, either you allergic to them or not, and in case you are don't eat them, simple.

User currently offlineblrsea From India, joined May 2005, 1414 posts, RR: 3
Reply 22, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 5850 times:

I guess peanut allergies are specific to countries which didn't grow peanuts for a long time. when I first came to US from India, I was suprised to hear about lactose-intolerance and peanut allergies in people. In India, lactose intolerance is almost unheard of, given the vast amount of diary consumed there. Peanut oil used to be main cooking oil in many parts of the country too, and peanuts used to be called a "poor man's almonds"  

User currently offlinebikerthai From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 2067 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 5826 times:

Quoting brenintw (Reply 13):

I think peanut allergies are a Western thing.

I know of Asian children who have peanut allergies.

Quoting robffm2 (Reply 19):

It's not a western thing. It's a U.S. thing.

May be true, the Asian children I knew who had the allergies lived in the US.

Quoting brenintw (Reply 13):
OTOH, in most Asian and African countries, it's entirely possible that food allergies kill a large number of children before the allergy can be diagnosed.

Probably true. Consider: Children with peanut allergies who lives in "high peanut" society will not be able to pass on their genes (assuming it's genetic related), you will find few people with peanut allergies in such society.

Quoting brenintw (Reply 16):
Allergies are much more complex than "simple" genetics.

LOL, more likely it's "complex genetics". I've developed a reaction to Soy in my adult years . . . I'm Asian . . . I live in the US . . . go figure. And don't talk to me about ginger and root beer!!!

bikerthai



Intelligent seeks knowledge. Enlightened seeks wisdom.
User currently offlineLHRBlueskies From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2007, 493 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (3 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 5792 times:

Why can't the airlines give the peanut-sufferers a face mask, like the Japanese wear, that should do the trick!


flying is the safest form of transport - until humans get involved!
25 Zkpilot : Can't speak for the peanut thing, but in the USA the majority of people with lactose intolerance are from ethnic minorities (ie people who aren't des
26 irelayer : There are a lot of allergies like that and there are different levels of "allergic" from what i know. Besides...what is to stop someone from packing
27 flymia : I was on 3 DL flights last week and got peanuts and every single one of them.
28 7673mech : I think it is up to the passenger to make a descision as to what they eat. They alirlines can not cater to everyone. I say this as an employee and as
29 EK413 : No airline guarantees meals will not have traces of nuts... Even Nut Free Meals have “may contain traces of nuts” labels attached... I know pretze
30 aerorobnz : If you want to bring nuts onboard there's nothing stopping you from taking them onboard in your carry on luggage, or eating them in the gate lounge an
31 bjorn14 : I think WN put Honey Roasted Peanuts back on their flights a couple of months ago.
32 Post contains links LoneStarMike : No, it's not a U.S. thing. excerpt from an interview with Heather Fraser who wrote History of the Peanut Allergy Epidemic. LoneStarMike
33 LHRBlueskies : Good point, surprised this hasn't been capitalised on already..
34 andz : I think if you suffer from an allergy as severe as this, the onus is on you to take appropriate precautions and make sure that you have medication ava
35 Post contains images wnbob : It's a Western thing. We over-use cleansers/sanitizers etc thereby shutting down our natural immune system. Africans don't have allergies. Plus that g
36 glbltrvlr : AFAIK, WN never took peanuts off their flights, although I have heard of a few individual cases where the FAs announced they weren't going to serve t
37 NZdsgnr : Oftentimes it is not even eating the peanuts, for some it is so bad that even just peanut dust that gets airborne is enough to trigger a reaction
38 Maverick623 : Sorry, but I refuse to believe that anyone who has a peanut allergy so severe that the mere presence of peanut dust can be lethal should be allowed to
39 Post contains images NZdsgnr : You are right... I think we need to create a special town just for them and segregate them. problem sloved. how dare them even want to travel and liv
40 Post contains images YYZALA : Allergies are actually around 75% genetic, which IS a significant component. But of course you are right there are obviously other factors involved.
41 Maverick623 : If you care to read my whole post, you'll see that peanuts are EVERYWHERE. There is simply no way to ensure their safety, unless you want to ban pean
42 NZdsgnr : If there is a possiblity to limit exposure when in an enclosed space such as an aircraft, why not try and do it. It isn't like someone highly allergi
43 Maverick623 : Because it's pointless, that's why. Oh, and just as a hint, most of the snack mixes that replaced peanuts either contain other nuts with peanut oil,
44 Post contains links tharanga : It's a pragmatic business decision. Peanut allergies are apparently particularly common, particularly dangerous, and I guess might be triggered by sma
45 mariner : Then maybe the market should decide. As sympathetic as I am to those with these allergies, I'm not sure that all airlines can be all things to all pe
46 Post contains images Antoniemey : Gee, Mariner, that sounds almost like... people being reasonable and responsible! It'll never happen.
47 Post contains links Maverick623 : False. http://www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/food...nderstanding/pages/quickfacts.aspx Also, peanut allergies are often separate from other nut allergies.
48 YYZALA : Yes sorry, I got slightly confused. AC doesn't serve peanuts in flight and there is nothing stopping you from bringing your own.
49 manfredj : I hope airlines serve what they want....it is their airline, should be their choice. How could you possibly cater to every allergy? Aren't costs high
50 tharanga : I would disagree. So far as potentially fatal allergies to everyday foods go, I'd say those rates you cite are pretty high and probably higher than t
51 Post contains links PacNWJet : I suppose people with peanut allergies would feel alienated by Emirates as well. Here is the airline's statement about nut allergies as it appears on
52 wnbob : I maybe over-extending myself, but the well known fact that bugs develops resistance to pesticide, micros mutate to adapt to drugs, tells me that nat
53 Post contains links glbltrvlr : It seems our favorite administrator has discovered that he can't ban peanuts on planes without congressional approval or scientific evidence that ther
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