Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Cessna Lands On Road In Quebec- Passenger Video  
User currently offlinegulfstream650 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2008, 538 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 6797 times:

Link here:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ds-aircraft-rush-hour-traffic.html

Video here:

http://en.video.canoe.tv/video/raw-v...cy-landing-on-highway/919707470001

Fair play - well executed off field landing.


I don't proclaim to be the best pilot in the world but I'm safe
20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCaptSkibi From United States of America, joined May 2004, 150 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 6774 times:

That's something you thankfully don't see every day. I'm glad the flight has a safe outcome, and kudos to the pilot for finding a safe landing area within gliding distance.

I'm surprised he didn't push the aircraft to block less of the highway afterwards. It looks like that semi might have a hard time going around the left wing! I suppose that'd be the last thing I think of given the situation. My arms and legs would probably be all jelly after the adrenaline wore off.



Private Pilot, Airplane Single Engine Land / DL Gold Elite
User currently offlinegulfstream650 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2008, 538 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 6448 times:

I must admit, I thought that the left wing was going to catch on one of those posts on the side of the road.


I don't proclaim to be the best pilot in the world but I'm safe
User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 5036 posts, RR: 19
Reply 3, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 6170 times:

The way the video was shot, I first thought it was an IFR emergency landing. Instrument conditions in a single engine combined with an emergency landing is no fun at all!

Yes, I thought he did a good job in setting up and landing the aircraft. But what in the world was that scraping noise just as he touched down? Did he scrape the tail on the road? Never heard that noise before in a high wing Cessna.

Why is he speaking in French on the radio? I thought English was the world wide standard for ATC?

And lastly, when the camera turns around in the direction of the rear seat passengers look at the guy with the red hair and crew cut. Look at his eyes? Are they open wide enough? I think he was scared to death.



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2839 posts, RR: 12
Reply 4, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 6097 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 4):
Why is he speaking in French on the radio? I thought English was the world wide standard for ATC?

You beat me to that question. I knew the Québécois language police were strict in Quebec but I had no idea they were that strict.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlineOzGlobal From France, joined Nov 2004, 2721 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 5937 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 4):
Why is he speaking in French on the radio? I thought English was the world wide standard for ATC?

No. English proficiency is required, in addition to that of the station on the ground. For local domestic airports this will often be the local language, e.g. Quebec, Quebecois French. French, English and Russian, at least were original international aviation languages:

Quote:
In which languages does a licence holder need to demonstrate proficiency?

Amendment 164 to Annex 1 has introduced strengthened language proficiency requirements for flight crew members and air traffic controllers. The language proficiency requirements apply to any language used for radiotelephony communications in international operations. Therefore, pilots on international flights shall demonstrate language proficiency in either English or the language used by the station on the ground. Controllers working on stations serving designated airports and routes used by international air services shall demonstrate language proficiency in English as well as in any other language(s) used by the station on the ground.
http://www.icao.int/icao/en/trivia/peltrgFAQ.htm#20



When all's said and done, there'll be more said than done.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25356 posts, RR: 22
Reply 6, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 5888 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 4):
Why is he speaking in French on the radio? I thought English was the world wide standard for ATC?

Many countries permit the use of their own language(s) in ATC communications. I ofen hear French or German being used with aircraft arriving/departing/overflying Switzerland, especially with non-airline aircraft (general aviation etc.).

Following are the Canadian regulations covering the use of French in ATC. The 3 tables at the bottom indicate where ATC services are available in both English and French.
http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviatio...cations/tp14371-com-annexa-467.htm


User currently offlinercair1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 1323 posts, RR: 52
Reply 7, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 5871 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT

Quoting type-rated (Reply 4):
Yes, I thought he did a good job in setting up and landing the aircraft. But what in the world was that scraping noise just as he touched down? Did he scrape the tail on the road? Never heard that noise before in a high wing Cessna.

I think you heard the stall warning horn. On this aircraft it is actually a whistle that starts to blow when the angle of attack reaches a certain point. In an emergency/short field landing - you should have that just on the edge of howling as you touch down. He did quite well in that regard - means he touched down at minimum speed. You can see the ASI during some of it and he was definitely stretching the glide.

I do think the "student" part is a little incorrect. He is licensed private, commercial student.



rcair1
User currently offlinerdh3e From United States of America, joined Mar 2011, 1676 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 5840 times:

Lucky for him it looks like he had his choice between the Highway, and about 12 suitable fields. It didn't really look like he set the plane up for best glide either, but some of those controls are out of the camera view. Sounded like a hard landing, especially considering that should be a quite basic landing given a highway is basically a runway granted I'm sure your nerves are going CRAZY!

User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 5036 posts, RR: 19
Reply 9, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 5682 times:

No, I heard the "buzzing" of the stall warning, this grinding noise started with the jolt of the touchdown and lasted for about 10 seconds. It could also have been a dry wheel bearing as well.


Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6669 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 5544 times:

I'm not gonna blame him as the outcome was good, but why land on a road with traffic when there are fields all around ?


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5648 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (3 years 4 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 5515 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 10):
but why land on a road with traffic when there are fields all around

Because the road is more suitable for an emergency landing.



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently offlineJEDYUL From Saudi Arabia, joined Apr 2011, 4 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 4618 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 10):

It's been raining quite a lot for the past couple of days so maybe the pilot thought the fields would be too muddy for a safe landing and opted for a solid road instead. Of course, only the pilot can tell you what he was thinking.

Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 11):

Actually, an empty field usually is the better option. Bumpy yes but I was taught not to rely on using the roads too often because of traffic and more importantly because of power lines that are usually placed near the roads. Then again, I'm not going to second guess a safe landing.


By the way everyone, this would make it my first post to A.net ever   ; however you could say I've been around here longer since I've been one of those ghost forum observers since as far back as 1999   


User currently offlinegulfstream650 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2008, 538 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 4278 times:

Quoting JEDYUL (Reply 12):
By the way everyone, this would make it my first post to A.net ever

Welcome / مرحبا بكم



I don't proclaim to be the best pilot in the world but I'm safe
User currently offlinercair1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 1323 posts, RR: 52
Reply 14, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 3557 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT

Quoting type-rated (Reply 9):
No, I heard the "buzzing" of the stall warning, this grinding noise started with the jolt of the touchdown and lasted for about 10 seconds. It could also have been a dry wheel bearing as well.

I had to go back and listen again. I think I heard a bounce - touched down 1 time, possibly with 1 wheel, then the again (or the other) in a second. The road noise is different - but it may be grooved pavement - does anybody know.

Quoting JEDYUL (Reply 12):
Actually, an empty field usually is the better option. Bumpy yes but I was taught not to rely on using the roads too often because of traffic and more importantly because of power lines that are usually placed near the roads. Then again, I'm not going to second guess a safe landing.

You never really get a great view of what is ahead, but it looked to me like the fields were bordered by trees and that approach and landing over the trees into the fields could have been quite trickly. Perhaps a 90 degree turn would have opened up a better approach - can't really tell - but at that altitude - 90 degree turn was contra indicated unless really needed. That road looked pretty inviting to me.

I was told - find a good spot and then concentrate on getting it down safely, not keep looking.

That said, I remember once during my PP training that my instructor pulled power and I set up to land in a field, and he said - what about that runway over there? It was a local farmers crop dusting private runway - and I hadn't even seen it. Well - it was actually about 70 degrees left and I had a straight ahead to a nice cut hayfield - so I found it and set up and stopped looking. Mixed lesson - I could have made the 'runway' (grass), but I'd found and focused on the landing I had lined up.



rcair1
User currently offlinebeechnut From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 726 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 3362 times:

This aircraft was based at my home field, and I was at the airfield when the aircraft was brought back on a flatbed. The highway in question is also my daily commute and the incident did cause quite a commotion. I drove past the landing area just after the plane had been picked up by a flatbed, and was at the airfield (ironically to bring my son and his girlfriend for her first-time plane ride) when it arrived.

I know the owner of the aircraft, and without getting into too many details, pending investigation, it was a mechanical failure. Since everyone walked away from the landing, and the aircraft will still be usable once the engine is fixed, it was in my books a great landing! The aircraft was returning from a sightseeing trip over Montreal and it is most fortunate that the incident happened over an open stretch of autoroute and not over the city in rush hour. The fields in our area are very saturated at the moment, and a landing in a field would have had a high chance of flipping the aircraft on its back. I would have gone for the road as well.

As for the communications in French, as others have pointed out English is not the only ATC language permitted according to ICAO regulations; the local language may also be used. Second point, the incident occurred in uncontrolled airspace about 5-10 n.m. from the airfield. It is an uncontrolled field and the pilot was talking to the airfield's unicom, not ATC.

Oh and on the comment about Quebec's «language police»: aviation is Federal jurisdiction in Canada, the Quebec government has nothing to do with the language used in aviation here.

Beech


User currently offlinegulfstream650 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2008, 538 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 3362 times:

Quoting rcair1 (Reply 14):
The road noise is different - but it may be grooved pavement - does anybody know.

This is a really common noise with Cessnas and really depends on the surface that you land on of course, with no engine in the main video you can really hear it.

Here is a video of myself landing a Cessna 172: http://youtu.be/fdSf0h8i2ys

You can really hear the noise on this video.

Another video of me landing here: http://youtu.be/EjUH30CfttQ

You can't hear it as much here but still on a grooved runway.

I was always taught to land with a whining stall warning horn and I maintain a nose-up attitute after landing to keep weight on the main gear, off the nose gear hence, you can still hear it after landing.



I don't proclaim to be the best pilot in the world but I'm safe
User currently offlinebeechnut From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 726 posts, RR: 10
Reply 17, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 3114 times:

Quoting rcair1 (Reply 14):
I had to go back and listen again. I think I heard a bounce - touched down 1 time, possibly with 1 wheel, then the again (or the other) in a second. The road noise is different - but it may be grooved pavement - does anybody know.

The autoroute in question has a grooved strip on the shoulders to help drivers stay alert if they drift off. Quite possibly a wheel was riding on one of them.

Beech


User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 5036 posts, RR: 19
Reply 18, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 3100 times:

Quoting rcair1 (Reply 14):
I had to go back and listen again. I think I heard a bounce - touched down 1 time, possibly with 1 wheel, then the again (or the other) in a second. The road noise is different - but it may be grooved pavement - does anybody know.

You know, I think that could be it. I have heard a similar sound when driving my car on deeply grooved highway myself.



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlinethenoflyzone From Canada, joined Jan 2001, 2494 posts, RR: 11
Reply 19, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 3056 times:

Anyone flying an aircraft within the Montreal FIR (or ARTCC, for any Americans reading) has the right to receive service in english or french, be it for an IFR or VFR flight.

This rule also applies to aircraft arriving or departing the Ottawa terminal area.

Thenoflyzone



us Air Traffic Controllers have a good record, we haven't left one up there yet !!
User currently offlinercair1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 1323 posts, RR: 52
Reply 20, posted (3 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2869 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT

Quoting gulfstream650 (Reply 16):
This is a really common noise with Cessnas

Guess it is one of those things you get used to in the aircraft and don't notice. I'm sure being in the rear, video, no engine, all contributed to a different sound.

Quoting gulfstream650 (Reply 16):
I was always taught to land with a whining stall warning horn and I maintain a nose-up attitute after landing to keep weight on the main gear,

Me too - also for short field, max decel.



rcair1
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Cessna Lands On Pa Turnpike posted Wed Jul 13 2005 19:40:34 by 777DadandJr
Cessna Lands On Street Safely In Elkhorn, NE posted Mon Mar 7 2005 17:21:56 by Rj777
Cessna Lands On A Busy Beirut Highway posted Sat Jul 3 2004 20:24:18 by Kevin
FedEx Cessna Lands On Highway posted Tue Apr 27 2004 18:13:56 by Cwapilot
Cessna Lands On Freeway In Caracas; Kills 2 posted Wed Apr 14 2004 11:49:17 by Ussherd
Plane Lands On Frontage Road posted Sun Apr 4 2004 11:00:42 by Tcfc424
Cessna 172 Lands On I-80 Near Reno. posted Mon Feb 22 2010 19:34:16 by PWMRamper
Plane Lands On Wisconsin Highway (video) posted Mon Jul 23 2007 15:18:06 by Nikeshashar
Passenger Jet Lands On A Grass Strip! posted Sun May 29 2005 04:00:49 by Alberchico
Cessna 207 Crashes On Soccer Field With Video. posted Mon Mar 7 2005 20:24:48 by ArmitageShanks