Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
New Plan To Speed Security For Frequent Flyers  
User currently offlineInnocuousFox From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2805 posts, RR: 14
Posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 9417 times:

From WSJ "Middle Seat" column.

"In what would be a major shift in procedures, the Transportation Security Administration is working on a system that would let "trusted travelers" keep their shoes on, leave laptops in bags and avoid body scanners altogether—one of the biggest improvements at the airport since 2001.

Drawing data from airline frequent-flier programs, the TSA plans to identify trusted travelers and indicate their status with a bar code on their boarding passes, said the agency's administrator, John Pistole. When the boarding pass and valid identification are presented at the security checkpoint, a trusted flier will be directed to the expedited screening line."

I would like to link to the article, but the forum software keeps eating my URL no matter which way I paste it in.

The Middle Seat: Looking to Speed Security for Frequent Fliers

[Edited 2011-05-09 07:03:41 by SA7700]


Dave Mark - Intrinsic Algorithm - Reducing the world to mathematical equations!
40 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offline0NEWAIR0 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 939 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 9327 times:

I wonder where the line will be drawn in terms of how frequent of a frequent traveler you must be to get trusted traveler status?...

(I too tried to post the link and it did not work... gave some message about not posting in anger...)



"The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams."
User currently offlineInnocuousFox From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2805 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 9257 times:

From the sounds of it (as per the rest of the article), they will be working with airlines and their frequent flier programs.

As much as I like the express security lines from my UA Premier status, I have to admit that the extra perks of shoes/laptop/no scans would be nice as well.



Dave Mark - Intrinsic Algorithm - Reducing the world to mathematical equations!
User currently offlineafbua1k2mm From United States of America, joined Jan 2011, 27 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 9212 times:

I hope that TSA can actually make this happen. I was part of TSA's beta test Trusted Traveler program back in the mid-2000's when in addition to the FBI background check you provided your retina scan and fingerprints, so there is no problem establishing criteria. As a member the of Global Entry program anything done in making the security process easier for the true elite frequent fliers will be greatly appreciated, especially when you fly over 150,000 miles each year!

User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9511 posts, RR: 52
Reply 4, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 9101 times:

One thing that surprises me is that many airports do not even allow airline employees to leave shoes on and laptop in bag at many airports. Some airports have employee only security sections where things move quicker, but at airports where employees have to use the normal security lanes, unless you are in a uniform of have a SIDA badge for that airport, they often make employees go through full security. I'm surprised that they are allowing trusted traveler before allowing nonworking flying employees to pass without the extra requirements.


If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineAirport From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 9053 times:

What's this...?

A good idea from TSA? It cannot be? I'm confused, it's well past April 1st isn't it? Can someone clarify, I don't understand.  

Cheers!
Anthony/Airport


User currently offlineAlasizon From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 289 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 9007 times:

I really consider though, how frequent do you have to be?

Say for instance, the threshold is set at 30 flights/year, some people will have those flights spread out across multiple carriers.

I love the idea, don't get me wrong, I just think it'll be a difficult determination for some people.



Window seats may be over-rated, but I'll take a window seat on a DC9 anyday
User currently offlineInnocuousFox From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2805 posts, RR: 14
Reply 7, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 9009 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 4):
I'm surprised that they are allowing trusted traveler before allowing nonworking flying employees to pass without the extra requirements.

Actually, from farther down in the article:

"An initial program to give pilots and flight attendants separate screening without body scanners or pat-downs will start this summer. Tests at different airports will follow, TSA said. If the concept moves forward, full implementation of the trusted-traveler program will take much longer, however, officials say."



Dave Mark - Intrinsic Algorithm - Reducing the world to mathematical equations!
User currently offline0NEWAIR0 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 939 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 8843 times:

Quoting InnocuousFox (Reply 2):
From the sounds of it (as per the rest of the article), they will be working with airlines and their frequent flier programs.

Right, I read that but it will be interesting to see if there will be a standard threshold for a trusted traveler or if it will be up to the airlines...

For instance... I bet the guy that flies 30+ times a year will get trusted traveler status, but I wonder if the guy that flies twice a year but buys $12,000 first class tickets each time also get "trusted traveler" status?



"The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams."
User currently offlineskymiler From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 524 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 8729 times:

er -- why not just link it to existing Trusted Traveller programs such as Nexus for border crossings? No need to re-enroll, photos already done and can be matched, etc.

Am I missing something?

(Although at 1 TSA checkpoint my Nexus card was refused by TSA -- never heard of it!!. I pointed out that it was issued by DHA and last time I looked they worked for DHS!) Dolt.



I love to fly, and it shows!
User currently offlinedaves1243 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 8 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 8721 times:

When I see the TSA patting down young children and grannies in wheelchairs, I have a hard time reconciling this concept with the way they operate today. It isn't clear to me how frequent flyer status could possibly correlate to security risk.

If an American flies weekly between JFK and Islamabad, and thereby achieves elite status does that make him low risk? If not, where do you draw the line?

Not to mention the fact that we live in an age where identity theft is neither uncommon nor difficult.


User currently offlinefbgdavidson From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 3701 posts, RR: 28
Reply 11, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 8668 times:

Whilst I see anything that helps me clear security a little easier (as an elite FF myself) I think that toning down the procedures makes a mockery of the whole thing, just like not patting down certain ethnicities/ages/sexes etc. is.

What's wrong with the Expert/Casual/Family lines plus premium/priority like a lot of the larger airports have? Sure it's open up to abuse (in the case of the Expert/Casual/Family) but it at least means that everyone is subject to the same security procedures. Just because someone travels a lot (or not very much at all if you include all elite tiers!) doesn't mean they're any less suspicious from a security perspective.

I don't see the correlation between these mooted security lines and the Global Entry scheme or other similars.



"My first job was selling doors, door to door, that's a tough job innit" - Bill Bailey
User currently offlineHPRamper From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4037 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 8531 times:

Quoting fbgdavidson (Reply 11):
Whilst I see anything that helps me clear security a little easier (as an elite FF myself) I think that toning down the procedures makes a mockery of the whole thing, just like not patting down certain ethnicities/ages/sexes etc. is.

Thank you.

While it would be more convenient, it completely nullifies the whole point of security. Who is to say one of those frequent fliers might have a bad day and decide to take it out on his next flight?

Sounds like trouble, and in a way, it's every bit as discriminatory as profiling based on ethnicity or appearance.


User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6539 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 8465 times:

Well, the shoe thing is only in the US (and to it I guess) isn't it ? So maybe that should go.


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlinecsavel From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1362 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 7242 times:

Quoting daves1243 (Reply 10):
When I see the TSA patting down young children and grannies in wheelchairs, I have a hard time reconciling this concept with the way they operate today.

I mostly agree with you, but I always think that there might be a Hindawi out there who will use granny or kid to stir things up. If I were the new #1 in Al-Qaeda that would be what I would be trying to do. This is not to say these kinds of stupid strip searches are necessary, but just that it isn't entirely utterly stupid.

Quoting HPRamper (Reply 12):
Who is to say one of those frequent fliers might have a bad day and decide to take it out on his next flight?

Or who is to say the most ethically, um, "correct" person isn't a one-man sleeper cell. Lars Erick Smorgasbord, blond, Lutheran, Norwegian IT specialist has for 15 years been secretly working for Al-Qaeda, and now, since he's painstakingly built up his trusted frequent flyer profile, will smuggle who knows what on the next flight. far fetched? You be! However, and I can't believe I am even trying to justify the stupid TSA, remember, a security agency has to be right all the time, a terrorist has to be successful only once.

That said what to do? Isreali airport type security? Sure works in Israel, but how are we going to scale that up by 1,000 percent, and are we willing to shell out shekels for that?



I may be ugly. I may be an American. But don't call me an ugly American.
User currently offlineInnocuousFox From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2805 posts, RR: 14
Reply 15, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 7156 times:

Again folks, some of your issues are addressed in the article. Too bad I can't paste the URL in here. It almost has me wanting to simply paste the whole bloody article text in. *sigh*


Dave Mark - Intrinsic Algorithm - Reducing the world to mathematical equations!
User currently offline747438 From UK - England, joined Jan 2007, 837 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 6875 times:

Quoting InnocuousFox (Thread starter):
leave laptops in bags

Not a good idea. It was trialed at LHR a couple of years ago and we, those that view the X-ray image, asked for this to be changed as with a laptop in the bag, the other items cannot been seen clearly enough.


User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9511 posts, RR: 52
Reply 17, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 6841 times:

Quoting InnocuousFox (Reply 7):
Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 4):
I'm surprised that they are allowing trusted traveler before allowing nonworking flying employees to pass without the extra requirements.

Actually, from farther down in the article:

"An initial program to give pilots and flight attendants separate screening without body scanners or pat-downs will start this summer. Tests at different airports will follow, TSA said. If the concept moves forward, full implementation of the trusted-traveler program will take much longer, however, officials say."

That's for pilots and flight attendants on duty. I'd expect the trusted traveler program to extend to all airline employees including airport staff, management, etc. If you work for an airline, you already have been screened for potential conflict, and anyone with an airline ID badge regardless of whether it is SIDA or not has far more access to aircraft than what the TSA can detect in a search.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlinegizmonc From United States of America, joined Mar 2011, 309 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 6540 times:

Could this be the link for the above:

http://finance.yahoo.com/family-home...ecurity-speed-wsj?mod=bb-budgeting


User currently offlineInnocuousFox From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2805 posts, RR: 14
Reply 19, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 6465 times:

Indeed that is it. Thanks!


Dave Mark - Intrinsic Algorithm - Reducing the world to mathematical equations!
User currently offlineAlwaysOnAPlane From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2010, 305 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 6214 times:

Quoting 0NEWAIR0 (Reply 8):
For instance... I bet the guy that flies 30+ times a year will get trusted traveler status, but I wonder if the guy that flies twice a year but buys $12,000 first class tickets each time also get "trusted traveler" status?

Well its not based on ticket price so no, probably not. But the guy flying twice a year probably won't be too fussed about that as its not a regular inconvenience.


User currently offlineckfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5182 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 6053 times:

If I remember correctly, Israel has a trusted traveler program. How does their program work? Can that program (as opposed to the entire security program) be adapted for the U.S.?

Now, in looking at basing a trusted traveler program based on F/F status, what if someone has been lowest elite for several years, then has a year with reduced travel, because of corporate budgets, change in job, etc.? Will he then lose his trusted traveler status?

What about people who have lifetime elite status, because they accumulated a significant number of miles (at AA, it's one million)? If you were a road warrior, then retire, do you still get to be a trusted traveler?

There are a number of questions that TSA and the airlines will have to discuss.

I do remember some time ago, Don Carty, then CEO of AMR/AA, said during an interview that AA/AE accumulates a lot of information about its AAdvantage members, whether they are Executive Platinum or the vacation traveler. He believed there were ways to use that information to determine who is high risk and who is low risk.


User currently offlineblueflyer From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 3942 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 6006 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Forget this Trusted Traveler program for a moment, I think the best nugget of this article is that the new TSA head apparently gets it. Two key quotes:
"Let's get away from one size fits all."
"We think we can improve the process and focus more on people we know nothing about."

How the new thinking will be implemented is key, of course, but at least they're apparently thinking in the right direction.

As for the Trusted Traveler program, I think/hope one's membership will be constantly re-considered against other data and that more than frequent flyer experience would be looked at. For one thing, because Al Qaeda terrorists are a patient bunch, I'd rule out membership for anyone having flown to/from a failed state, or states known to have harbored terrorists (Pakistan, to be blunt) for at least five years, no matter how many miles they may have raked up on domestic flights... No, it's not perfect, it will not catch the terrorist spending a month off in Germany after training, but it's a start.

What I fear is Congress' reaction the day the John Q Neverfly family heads for a trip to Orlando and complains very loudly in front of cameras eager for drama because, in their quest to find out more about people they know nothing about, a TSA agent gets a little bit overzealous and accidentally puts a hand not exactly where it was supposed to go.



I've got $h*t to do
User currently offlinegoblin211 From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 1209 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 5939 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 4):
I'm surprised that they are allowing trusted traveler before allowing nonworking flying employees to pass without the extra requirements.

Me too. I would think those who work at the airport would be first to test this program. I think nowadays a lot of people are being treated special because they fly so often, whicjh is all well and good but I'm sure those who travel a little now and thern would have something to say about it. Besides, I still maintain that going through security isn't the worst thing in the world and i don't know why so many people are complaining about going through it and especially the TSA for trying to cater to the FFs.



From the airport with love
User currently offlineckfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5182 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (3 years 2 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 5902 times:

Quoting goblin211 (Reply 23):
Besides, I still maintain that going through security isn't the worst thing in the world and i don't know why so many people are complaining about going through it and especially the TSA for trying to cater to the FFs.

Why do people complain? Because people who have never been arrested, or even stopped for anything beyond a simple speeding violation, don't take well to the idea of being frisked or patted down.


25 nipoel123 : Still, if Al-Qaeda, or any other terrorist group, really want to blow up a plane, they'd either approach a frequent flyer, or work someone up the prog
26 srbmod : There's something about the way WSJ links render with our forum software that causes that issue. Your best option is to use one of the various link-s
27 InnocuousFox : Tried that with my bi.ly account. Got dorked up as well.
28 genybustrvlr : Really? Do you fly often? ever? Granny and the family think they're experts and get on that line but then Granny has her sharp knitting needles, an o
29 2175301 : How about trusted status to anyone who holds certain levels of security clearances. In my job the initial security clearance screening takes 3 months
30 Post contains images commavia : I really hope they allow Global Entry members the shot at getting access to a domestic Trusted Traveler program - that would be awesome. I was more th
31 InnocuousFox : They are not going to set up separate lines for the 1 person in 10,000 that would bother spending that money and time. It would be pointless.
32 DeltAirlines : Agreed - if one part of DHS can get it right, why can't the Smurf Patrol? Allowing GE/NEXUS/SENTRI passengers priority security access would make tha
33 commavia : They could triple the cost and then even more people would pay it. I was willing to pay $100 for 5 years of Global Entry - and I feel perfectly satis
34 fbgdavidson : Yes, but admittedly most of my travels aren't using airports with the system or I use the priority line in preference to it. The few times I have use
35 MNMncrcnwjr : At the airports I frequent that have these, ONLY STL enforces the status line... all other places it was wide open, with no way too determine "Expert
36 ckfred : MCO also enforces the status line. If you have small children, they force you into the family line, even if you say that both parents are elite, and
37 thegman : That could work, but then so many would gripe that the US government would have to put in effect a policy that allows you to pay for a top secret sec
38 wnbob : It's a joke. After 9 years? Somebody compute the productivity loss and resource wasted by repeat screening. I said it b4r and I say it again. OBL alre
39 InnocuousFox : Probably quite true... the wealth-envy crowd would file lawsuits about discrimination. Actually, come to think of it, people are probably going to bi
40 par13del : So here's my question, will airlines now adjust their schedules now that the "important people" will get thru screening quicker?
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
A New Perk For Frequent Flyers posted Mon Mar 11 2002 21:59:49 by PROSA
New Camera May Speed Security Up posted Mon Mar 10 2008 20:23:32 by Lufthansa411
Question For Frequent Flyers! posted Wed Dec 13 2006 15:28:41 by Noelg
DTW To Ease Security For Hotel Guests posted Fri Dec 8 2006 14:30:30 by KarlB737
Pilot - A New Approach To Airline Security posted Mon Jun 6 2005 03:24:52 by JumboJet
A Question About PTV For Frequent Flyers posted Mon Feb 21 2000 16:18:51 by Dl_mech
US Airways To Get A340s For New China Routes! posted Wed Jan 2 2008 11:35:51 by EI321
TOL Taxis Out Rewards Plan To Attract More Flyers posted Sat Sep 29 2007 19:25:33 by KarlB737
AeroMexico Applies For Ten New Routes To The US posted Mon May 14 2007 23:45:45 by MAH4546
A New Plan For The A380F? posted Fri Apr 27 2007 22:58:47 by Confuscius