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Repair Of Qantas A380 Starts In SIN  
User currently offlinescbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12631 posts, RR: 46
Posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 9220 times:
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The repair of the damaged Qantas A380 at Singapore has started. The aim is to have the plane repairs completed and a first test flight is provisionally scheduled for 6th Jan 2012.

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/gener...%20A380%20Refurbishment%20Underway

Quote:
Work to return to service the Qantas Airbus A380 damaged in last November’s uncontained engine failure is underway in Singapore.

Good news.


Time flies like an arrow, but fruit flies like a banana!
13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineqantas834300 From Australia, joined Mar 2010, 10 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 9158 times:

Wouldn't it make a grand entrance to return VH-OQA "Nancy Bird Walton" back to her home base Sydney on January 26 2012, what a spectacular Australia Day Fly over.

User currently offlinetruemanQLD From Australia, joined Feb 2007, 1562 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 9143 times:

It is about time! Surely the insurance company (who is paying for the repairs) could have started it earlier?

User currently offlineEK413 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 4977 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 9052 times:

Finally repairs are underway...
Guess that will eliminate all the speculation...

EK413



Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. We are tonight’s entertainment!
User currently offlineairportugal310 From Tokelau, joined Apr 2004, 3658 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 8989 times:

Quoting truemanQLD (Reply 2):
It is about time! Surely the insurance company (who is paying for the repairs) could have started it earlier?

Two things make airplanes fly...money and paperwork...

I'm sure the paperwork and red tape (if any) took this long to complete! And there is much much much more to come!



I sell airplanes and airplane accessories
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6724 posts, RR: 12
Reply 5, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 7875 times:

It's about time !

Tidbits of the article I didn't know about (it's possible I missed them) :

Quote:
repair work, covered under an Aus $135 million insurance claim
Quote:
But with the co-operation of Rolls-Royce we have put a line of defense into the Fadec (full authority digital engine control), so that in the event of detecting a similar condition it will shut down quickly,” he adds.

Rolls has “now inspected and modified the whole fleet,” says Carcallet. For the moment the fix is the revised Fadec software, though longer term design changes are also underway to the engine, he adds.
Quote:
Rolls-Royce has also agreed to pay (US) $100.5 million compensation to Qantas.



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlinen729pa From UK - England, joined Jan 2011, 423 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 7767 times:

I saw her a few weeks ago in SIN looking a bit sorry for herself, January seems a long time away but it'll be here before we know it.

Best news I've heard all day!

  


User currently onlinekiwiandrew From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 8580 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 7412 times:
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Quoting truemanQLD (Reply 2):
It is about time! Surely the insurance company (who is paying for the repairs) could have started it earlier?



The insurance company are paying for the repairs, but I certainly hope they are not doing the work.

The insurance company could not give a go ahead until the actual repairers worked out a detailed cost, after all, if the repair cost was too great the insurers could simply have declared the aircraft a write off and paid out on the value of the frame, no insurer is going to write a blank cheque and say go ahead whatever the cost.

As an A380 has never needed repairs of this nature before ( and damage of this nature was not anticipated) the manufacturers have had to work out firstly whether it is even possible to repair safely ,secondly how to do it and thirdly how much it is expected to cost before the insurers would be able/willing to give the go ahead .

Working out how to fix major structural damage to an aircraft is not something that you rush into, or that you decide to make up as you go along.



Moderation in all things ... including moderation ;-)
User currently offlinen471wn From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1561 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 7322 times:
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Quoting kiwiandrew (Reply 7):
after all, if the repair cost was too great the insurers could simply have declared the aircraft a write off and paid out on the value of the frame,

Not in this case----as has been discussed over and over in this forum----Qantas and Airbus were not going to have a w/o on the 380 program.


User currently onlinekiwiandrew From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 8580 posts, RR: 13
Reply 9, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 7238 times:
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Quoting n471wn (Reply 8):
Not in this case----as has been discussed over and over in this forum----Qantas and Airbus were not going to have a w/o on the 380 program.

Yes, it has been discussed over and over in this forum ... that does not make it a fact.

The decision to make an insurance write off rests solely with the insurer. If the insurer found that the repairs were going to cost more than writing the value of the frame off that is exactly what the insurer would decide to do, whether QF /airbus liked it or not.

Of course QF/Airbus could still choose to go ahead an repair the frame anyway at their own cost ( and using the insurance payout to cover a significant chunk of them) , but for one moment imagine that they chose to do so and that 5 years later the frame was involved in another serious incident or worse still an actual crash. Regardless of how competently the repairs were carried out, or whether the repairs had any bearing at all on a future incident can you imagine if the media got hold of information that the insurance company had earlier declared the aircraft a write-off. There would be a flood of stories about how QF had "patched up" a "wreck" and put it back into service carrying unsuspecting passengers. Furthermore can you imagine the legal battles that would go on for years dragging QFs name through the mud. QF are justifiably proud of the safety record in spite of a number of well publicised incidents in recent years ( many of which have been blown out of all proportion) . I do not believe that QF would choose to go down that path.



Moderation in all things ... including moderation ;-)
User currently offlineClassicLover From Ireland, joined Mar 2004, 4640 posts, RR: 23
Reply 10, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 7211 times:

Quoting n471wn (Reply 8):
Not in this case----as has been discussed over and over in this forum----Qantas and Airbus were not going to have a w/o on the 380 program.

It wouldn't exactly effect Qantas' reputation if it was written off. No-one was injured, so if writing off the airframe made sense, it would be done. End of story. I'm sick of the endless discussion on how Qantas are apparently making these decisions to keep their "unblemished" safety record (which is also a fallacy).



I do quite enjoy a spot of flying - more so when it's not in Economy!
User currently offlineflyglobal From Germany, joined Mar 2008, 590 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 6793 times:

Quoting kiwiandrew (Reply 7):
Working out how to fix major structural damage to an aircraft is not something that you rush into, or that you decide to make up as you go along.



An din addition they need to work it out to be done off site the factory. So quite some thoughts about repair strategy, needed equipment and peoples scheduling had to be done. And nothing could be downloaded and printed from a 'Word File', like a Handbook.

Great

regards

Flaglobal


User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12717 posts, RR: 25
Reply 12, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4114 times:

Quoting kiwiandrew (Reply 7):
damage of this nature was not anticipated

I think airframe manufacturers anticipate that almost anything can happen to their aircraft.

I imagine an exploding engine is anticipated, and the design tries to tolerate the damage as best as possible.

Of course, every possible variation of an engine exploding can't be examined, but they know the general modalities and try to design for them.

Quoting kiwiandrew (Reply 9):
The decision to make an insurance write off rests solely with the insurer. If the insurer found that the repairs were going to cost more than writing the value of the frame off that is exactly what the insurer would decide to do, whether QF /airbus liked it or not.

Of course QF/Airbus could still choose to go ahead an repair the frame anyway at their own cost ( and using the insurance payout to cover a significant chunk of them) , but for one moment imagine that they chose to do so and that 5 years later the frame was involved in another serious incident or worse still an actual crash. Regardless of how competently the repairs were carried out, or whether the repairs had any bearing at all on a future incident can you imagine if the media got hold of information that the insurance company had earlier declared the aircraft a write-off.

All an insurance company "write-off" means that it's beyond economic repair, meaning the cost to repair is greater than the amount of insurance coverage.

It's the airframe manufacturer, in this case Airbus, who can say it's not repairable.

We don't know what's happening in this case because none of the parties will say, nor do they have to say.

There's plenty of airframes flying around today that have had large-scale repairs.

Surely the press will try to make hay if any one of them have an incident.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineBaroque From Australia, joined Apr 2006, 15380 posts, RR: 59
Reply 13, posted (3 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 4020 times:

Quoting airportugal310 (Reply 4):
Two things make airplanes fly...money and paperwork...

I suppose that is about the best way of explaining what seems an inexplicably long delay!

Quoting Revelation (Reply 12):
I imagine an exploding engine is anticipated, and the design tries to tolerate the damage as best as possible.

Nice turn of phrase, again probably about right, they do try to make the thing damage tolerant, otherwise Indonesia would now be the not-so-proud owner of an A380 wreck. The solution is so simple, fix the FADEC to avoid overspeeding, you wonder why not already in there. Mind you, making pipes to spec would have been another good idea, but the FADEC fix should cope with that if it were ever to happen again (***** **** ****** ***) but also a few other things that have not been thought of.

Still and all, the demise of Nancy (apparently) has its up side, my QF31/QF32 trip to LHR and back in Sept will cost me about 7% less than it would have done courtesy of a QF "apology+" for putting me on a 767 on an A333 route in January!! Tsk tsk. I am still trying to work out what the fuss was all about. Sorry about the double negative, but one thing you cannot say about Qantas is that they did not react to the QF32 T900 incident - they did!


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