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Continental's First Moves After Deregulation  
User currently offline727LOVER From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 6422 posts, RR: 17
Posted (3 years 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 1778 times:

This of course, refers to "old" Continental, before Texas Air Tramp got their grubby hands on them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airline_Deregulation_Act

The Airline Deregulation Act (Pub.L. 95-504) is a United States federal law signed into law on October 24, 1978. The main purpose of the act was to remove government control over fares, routes and market entry (of new airlines) from commercial aviation. The Civil Aeronautics Board's powers of regulation were to be phased out, eventually allowing passengers to be exposed to market forces in the airline industry. The Act, however, did not remove or diminish the FAA's regulatory powers over all aspects of airline safety.
The Airline Deregulation Act (Pub.L. 95-504) is a United States federal law signed into law on October 24, 1978. The main purpose of the act was to remove government control over fares, routes and market entry (of new airlines) from commercial aviation. The Civil Aeronautics Board's powers of regulation were to be phased out, eventually allowing passengers to be exposed to market forces in the airline industry. The Act, however, did not remove or diminish the FAA's regulatory powers over all aspects of airline safety.




What were CO's first moves in this new era. What routes did they immediately start? Asset purchases, leasing of aircraft for expansion, new aircraft orders, merger talk,....etc.............

Well, with only one airline left to go before this series over, I feel foolish. It never occured to me to check wikipedia.......

But still, it's fun to discuss.  
That's what this forum is all about. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continental_airlines


After the 1978 passage of the Airline Deregulation Act, Continental embarked on an aggressive program of route expansion. October 1978 saw Continental begin flights from the New York area airports to Houston and Denver, and from Denver to Phoenix.[13] That same month, Continental inaugurated DC-10 service between Los Angeles and Taipei, via Honolulu and Guam. Service between Houston and Washington, D.C., began in January 1979. In June 1979, Continental linked Denver with Washington, D.C., Las Vegas, San Francisco and San Jose and also began Houston-Tampa service.[13] The airline suffered in 1979 when the DC-10 was grounded nationwide. Given that Continental Airlines only operated the DC-10 and the 727 at the time, flights to Hawaii were cancelled during the grounding. By the time of the Texas Air Corp. acquisition in 1981, Continental's post-deregulation growth had allowed it to penetrate every major U.S. airline market (and all of the regional markets) from the hubs in Denver and Houston, and the rapid expansion in the air was answered with large-scale facilities expansions at each of these airports. In Denver, Continental's very rapid growth provided the final impetus for the construction of the new Denver International Airport, which would be completed almost fifteen years later.[11][13][page needed]


Continental DC-10 at Narita Airport, JapanWhile deregulation allowed Continental to expand into new profitable areas, it hurt the company's existing business as consumers were for the first time able to choose lower fares over Continental's better service. During 1978, Continental explored the possibility of a merger with Western Airlines.[13] Western was also headquartered at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) and operated a fleet consisting predominantly of the same B-727 and DC-10 aircraft types as Continental. The route systems would have been complementary, with little overlap; because, although they both served the Western states, Continental had strength in Hawaii, southern-tier and the Great Plains states; Western's strengths were in the California intrastate market, Alaska, Mexico, and the intermountain West. Both airlines served the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain states, but along different routes from Los Angeles, Denver, San Francisco, Seattle and Phoenix. This merger was not consummated, however, and industry changes were to take Continental down a very different path.[11][13]

Unlike some airlines (notably Braniff whose expansion was so rapid and unsustainable that the additional costs made investment recovery impossible, and the carrier was forced into bankruptcy and liquidation), Continental's rate of expansion following passage of the Airline Deregulation Act seems, in retrospect, to have been appropriate. The markets that were added were almost all profitable, absorbing some of the hits to its existing markets and helping it in its difficult times between 1982 and 1994.


Where did they operate the 747-124?



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Listen Betty, don't start up with your 'White Zone' s*** again.
3 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRogerThat From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 566 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 1486 times:

My first wide body flights were on CO B747 LAX-HNL in 1972 then again in 1973. CO switched to DC-10s soon after.

Cool shots of the upper deck lounge


User currently offlineCALPSAFltSkeds From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 2613 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (3 years 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 1446 times:

I don't think you've had much action on this thread as the narrative in the original post was very detailed on CO's post-deregulation actions.

Quoting 727LOVER (Thread starter):
Where did they operate the 747-124?

The 4 747-124s, delivered in 1970, were flown on the following routes (from departedflights.com).

1971 timetable
ORD-DEN 2
ORD-LAX 2
DEN-LAX 1
LAX-HNL 2

It looks like these aircraft stopped flying for CO in 1974 or 1975. The 16 DC10-10s were delivered starting in 1972. The last 12 DC10-10s were delivered (I believe) with main deck cargo doors. there was a U.S. program where the government paid something to have the doors installed in trade for potential emergency use.


User currently offlineFlyCaledonian From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2080 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (3 years 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1222 times:

It would have been interesting to see how a CO/WA merger played out, producing a carrier very strong in the Western USA.


Let's Go British Caledonian!
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