Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
AA Boarding Study Finds 'random' Is Best  
User currently onlinebjorn14 From Norway, joined Feb 2010, 3469 posts, RR: 2
Posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 13893 times:

I believe AA commisioned this study but it was carried out by the University of Colorado.

In short, out of the three major boarding styles. Random appears to be the best. AA has reduced their seating groups from 10 to 6. Do you agree with the conclusions?

http://leeds-faculty.colorado.edu/va...cts/boarding/boarding.htm#section2


"I want to know the voice of God the rest is just details" --A. Einstein
76 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinesphealey From United States of America, joined May 2005, 377 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 13877 times:

> In short, out of the three major boarding styles. Random appears
> to be the best. AA has reduced their seating groups from 10 to 6.
> Do you agree with the conclusions?

Even simple queuing theory problems can produce optimal solutions that are deeply un-intuitive to humans, and I would say aircraft boarding is far from a simple problem. So whether or not we agree with the conclusion without having done the observation and math ourselves doesn't mean much; it is more a matter of psychology and marketing to determine if the passengers would accept such a process without rioting in the boarding area (since they would consider it on the surface "unfair" compared to current practice).

sPh


User currently offlinepqdtw From Netherlands, joined Aug 2008, 154 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 13854 times:

I think we should school all of our passengers in Japan.

I have boarded a full 744 with 403 passengers in KIX in 21 minutes with all the overhead bins closed, passengers seated and cabin ready for pushback. Why it takes Americans and Europeans FOREVER to board a plane, is still beyond me...


User currently onlineseabosdca From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 5467 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 13825 times:

Quoting bjorn14 (Thread starter):
Random appears to be the best

Actually, they seem to find that outside-in and reverse-pyramid (outside-in but with a back-to-front component added) work best.

But they really should have added a couple of features to their simulation model: a few people boarding out of turn, and more variable luggage-stowing time. Irrespective of which model is being used, I find the worst delays come from people who spend a very long time in the aisle, either because stowing their carryon is a challenge for some reason, or because they have to futz around in their carryon for a couple minutes at the worst possible time (oblivious to the huge line behind them).

[Edited 2011-08-05 04:37:28]

User currently onlinebjorn14 From Norway, joined Feb 2010, 3469 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 13657 times:

I was thinking they might use animated simulation models they use to see how humans react while entering an arena/stadium or how they react when fire hits a building.


"I want to know the voice of God the rest is just details" --A. Einstein
User currently offlineburnsie28 From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 7546 posts, RR: 8
Reply 5, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 13597 times:

This is why NW went to all rows for coach after the FC and Elite members, NW found that the planes boarded faster when everyone could board the aircraft rather than calling by rows or zones.


"Some People Just Know How To Fly"- Best slogan ever, RIP NW 1926-2009
User currently offlineUALFAson From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 730 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 13494 times:

It would make sense that the reverse-pyramid style would be fastest, at least in theory.

The problem is that it leaves the "best" seats--aisles and the forward rows of Economy--boarding last. These seats are usually occupied by elite level frequent flyers. These folks want to board first so as to not have to mingle with the little people and also want first dibs at overhead bin space, which nowadays almost always fills up by the time the last folks board the plane.

Sounds like NW, according to what burnsie28 posted, had the right idea, or something close to it.



"We hope you've enjoyed flying with us as much as we've enjoyed taking you for a ride."
User currently offlinevhtje From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2009, 373 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 13489 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting pqdtw (Reply 2):
Why it takes Americans and Europeans FOREVER to board a plane, is still beyond me...

I was sitting in the front row in Y+ on BA last Sunday heading LHR to ORD. Down the isle came this I guess 60-ish gentleman who clearly was lost, and this was very late in the boarding process (if he wasn't the last to board, he was among the last)

He went through the Y+ cabin down to Y, only to return about 3 minutes later to finally take his seat somewhere in J. This was of course with two pieces of hand luggage in tow, banging them on the seats, arms and heads as he went.

My point is, how stupid/confused/unaware can you be that you don't know you have a J class ticket/seat and cannot tell a J seat from a Y seat, let alone a Y+ seat?

Imagine if he'd done that during the main boarding, it would have been chaos as he banged through the people in Y/Y+ as they were putting their luggage into bins, got comfortable, etc.

On a similar note, you often see people with a Y seat checking in the F and J cabins for their seat number, thus slowing down the boarding process. I mean, come on, you KNOW you're travelling Y, so why even bother looking until you get into your cabin?


User currently onlineseabosdca From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 5467 posts, RR: 6
Reply 8, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 13420 times:

Quoting UALFAson (Reply 6):
These seats are usually occupied by elite level frequent flyers. These folks want to board first so as to not have to mingle with the little people and also want first dibs at overhead bin space, which nowadays almost always fills up by the time the last folks board the plane.

At least in the US, elite level FFs get to board first anyway.


User currently offlineshufflemoomin From Denmark, joined Jun 2010, 480 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 13322 times:

I've always found boarding from back to front is best. I hate flying airlines with random seating where people choose to sit at the front (because getting off the plane 60 seconds before the back is priceless) and you're stuck with a huge queue while everyone at the front f**ks around in the aisle and blocks everyone else in. I'd take row numbers, front to back any day.

User currently offlinebrilondon From Canada, joined Aug 2005, 4237 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 13283 times:

I believe that the best way of getting on a an aircraft is to board from two doors on aircraft that has them. WS uses this method and it seems to work best for them, except of course when there is s hockey game on the TV in the bar and the captain is watching it.


Rush for ever; Yankees all the way!!
User currently offlineMHTripple7 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1105 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 13269 times:

Boarding by zones would work perfectly if there were no elites or F / J passengers AND everyone was at the gate on-time. As we all know, this is far from the case, and boarding by zones ends up being a slightly organized free-for-all.

The most practical way would be to board F / J pax first, then elites, and then everyone else.

Quoting pqdtw (Reply 2):
Why it takes Americans and Europeans FOREVER to board a plane, is still beyond me...

Have you ever boarded a flight to Africa? I've never seen anything like it, nobody seems to care about an on-time departure.


User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21637 posts, RR: 55
Reply 12, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 13250 times:

Quoting seabosdca (Reply 8):
Quoting UALFAson (Reply 6):
These seats are usually occupied by elite level frequent flyers. These folks want to board first so as to not have to mingle with the little people and also want first dibs at overhead bin space, which nowadays almost always fills up by the time the last folks board the plane.

At least in the US, elite level FFs get to board first anyway.

Which was kind of his point - if FFs boarding first are out of sync with the boarding scheme, then the boarding scheme isn't going to work as well.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineBRJ From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 264 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 13186 times:

At one time, I know LH used to board outside in - windows, middles and then aisles. Is this still their process? Seems like this would make the most sense, for general boarding at least.

User currently offlineSchorschNG From Germany, joined Sep 2010, 500 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 13067 times:

Many studies have shown that random works best.
And random is also the most robust.

The boarding issue depends very much on the people itself. And on their willingness to behave.

Boeing found that boarding pax flow has decreased.

A very good piece on boarding is to be found here:
http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aer...azine/aero_01/textonly/t01txt.html

The suggested inverse pyramid looks nice in theory, but I very much doubt it works in practice. It also separates couples and families. This study was done by Boeing to prove the B757-300 can be boarded via a single door in acceptable time. So it clearly has a hidden agenda. However, the methodology beats any study done since.



From a structural standpoint, passengers are the worst possible payload. [Michael Chun-Yung Niu]
User currently offlinesphealey From United States of America, joined May 2005, 377 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 12951 times:

There is also the issue of carry-on luggage. Airlines have driven passengers to extensive use of carry-ons in preference to checked luggage without regard for the capacity of airplane to handle same. The result is longer boarding times (and often angry passengers), which is apparently an acceptable trade-off from the airlines' point of view.

sPh


User currently offlinebrilondon From Canada, joined Aug 2005, 4237 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 12808 times:

Quoting burnsie28 (Reply 5):
This is why NW went to all rows for coach after the FC and Elite members, NW found that the planes boarded faster when everyone could board the aircraft rather than calling by rows or zones.

Which is the best method I think that there is out there IMHO. Although, I would suggest that you just allow all over to board the aircraft, regardless of their Frequent Flyer status. If you want to have a bin close to where you are sitting then you better be there to get it, other wise you take your chances.



Rush for ever; Yankees all the way!!
User currently offlineKingAir200 From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1620 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 12675 times:

I loved NW style. It seems to me that half the time when boarding by zones or seating groups, passengers just board whenever they feel like it. And if the agent doesn't say anything, which a lot of times they don't, what's the point of even having a zone or group?


Hey Swifty
User currently offlineGrid From Kazakhstan, joined Apr 2010, 624 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 12516 times:

Quoting MHTripple7 (Reply 11):
Have you ever boarded a flight to Africa? I've never seen anything like it, nobody seems to care about an on-time departure.

Well, were all those boarding Americans and Europeans? If so, you can both be right.

Quoting KingAir200 (Reply 17):
I loved NW style. It seems to me that half the time when boarding by zones or seating groups, passengers just board whenever they feel like it. And if the agent doesn't say anything, which a lot of times they don't, what's the point of even having a zone or group?

Yes, this is the main problem, along with people hanging out right near the door. You can't tell whether they are in line or just hanging out and no one wants to be a cutter so they just add to the clutter.



ATR72 E120 E140 E170 E190 Q200 717 727 737 747 757 767 777 A319 A320 A321 A330 A340 MD11 MD82 MD83 MD88 MD90
User currently offlinepqdtw From Netherlands, joined Aug 2008, 154 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 12422 times:

Quoting burnsie28 (Reply 5):
This is why NW went to all rows for coach after the FC and Elite members, NW found that the planes boarded faster when everyone could board the aircraft rather than calling by rows or zones.

Part of the philosophy behind it also was that that happened during the time that agents began to board flights all alone without a second agent. Northwest wanted to "lighten the load" on the agents by not having them have to continuous make announcements as they were scanning boarding passes and answering other question, dealing with complicated passenger transactions at the computer, etc.

I was always very skeptical of this approach. In my experience, we didn't board airplanes any faster with the "all aboard" approach.

Quoting sphealey (Reply 15):
There is also the issue of carry-on luggage. Airlines have driven passengers to extensive use of carry-ons in preference to checked luggage without regard for the capacity of airplane to handle same. The result is longer boarding times (and often angry passengers), which is apparently an acceptable trade-off from the airlines' point of view.

Yes, there has been more carry-on since bag fees, but I have to say that I haven't seen THAT much more carry-on. I think that the bag fees get blamed for this all the time, but I don't think it really started the problem. It started in the mid-1990's -- long before checked bag fees were introduced. This was especially so in business-to-business markets where the bulk of the passengers were not leisure travelers, but true road warriors. Try to check a bag of a business traveler and see what kind of hell you'll have to pay for it . . .


User currently offlinevoltage From United States of America, joined May 2007, 109 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 12393 times:

Quoting Grid (Reply 18):
Quoting KingAir200 (Reply 17):
I loved NW style. It seems to me that half the time when boarding by zones or seating groups, passengers just board whenever they feel like it. And if the agent doesn't say anything, which a lot of times they don't, what's the point of even having a zone or group?

Yes, this is the main problem, along with people hanging out right near the door. You can't tell whether they are in line or just hanging out and no one wants to be a cutter so they just add to the clutter.

This is one of my biggest pet peeves about flying the legacies. I personally love WN's boarding system; it is so much more organized. I think it's funny how WN still gets accused of having "cattle call" boarding, yet the legacies are the ones with a giant herd waiting to walk down the jetway.

I believe there has got to be a way to optimize the boarding procedure if everyone has an assigned boarding number a la Southwest, even if there are assigned seats. Somone should be able to program an algorithm that automatically puts elites at the front of the line, keeps families together, and boards everyone else in the most efficient way possible (reverse pyramid?). It would be an interesting thought experiment about how to program said algorithm.


User currently offlinepqdtw From Netherlands, joined Aug 2008, 154 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 12320 times:

Quoting voltage (Reply 20):
Quoting Grid (Reply 18):
Quoting KingAir200 (Reply 17):
I loved NW style. It seems to me that half the time when boarding by zones or seating groups, passengers just board whenever they feel like it. And if the agent doesn't say anything, which a lot of times they don't, what's the point of even having a zone or group?

Yes, this is the main problem, along with people hanging out right near the door. You can't tell whether they are in line or just hanging out and no one wants to be a cutter so they just add to the clutter.

This is one of my biggest pet peeves about flying the legacies. I personally love WN's boarding system; it is so much more organized. I think it's funny how WN still gets accused of having "cattle call" boarding, yet the legacies are the ones with a giant herd waiting to walk down the jetway.

I believe there has got to be a way to optimize the boarding procedure if everyone has an assigned boarding number a la Southwest, even if there are assigned seats. Somone should be able to program an algorithm that automatically puts elites at the front of the line, keeps families together, and boards everyone else in the most efficient way possible (reverse pyramid?). It would be an interesting thought experiment about how to program said algorithm.

I think you inverted your airline code... the poster was referring to NW, not WN . . .


User currently offlinegatorfan From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 331 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 12297 times:

the boarding problem is really a carry-on problem at its root. I don't care AT all what order I board in as long as there's room for my carryon in the overhead - particularly when I'm travelling on business on an expensive ticket which usually has me connecting and often on a tight connection. I've actually thought that the best way to deal with it is to strictly limit carry-on based on fare basis of the ticket.

Deeply discounted tickets for leisure flyers should not get any overhead space. The higher the fare class the larger the bag you'd be allowed to take. I know policing this would be a bitch but if you did it land side, I think you could increase revenues significantly. Heck, I'd even pay $20 more a trip to be guaranteed overhead space for my regularly sized bag. But it pisses me off to no end when I board a flight after running through the airport because my inbound flight was late and find that all the overhead space is taken by people who purchased tickets that are probably 1/3 the price of what I paid.


User currently offlinevoltage From United States of America, joined May 2007, 109 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 12294 times:

Quoting pqdtw (Reply 21):
I think you inverted your airline code... the poster was referring to NW, not WN . . .

Nope, WN was intended. NW's boarding (and UA, AA, DL, US, etc.) always seems to lead to a huge crowd hanging out by the gate, whereas Southwest's boarding is refreshingly more organized.


User currently offlineckfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5239 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (3 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 12295 times:

AA use to call for handicapped passengers or "passengers needing a little extra time" and for families boarding with small children, before First Class was called. Then, they did away with that.

I can understand that a lot of people might abuse the idea of who is handicapped or needs extra time. Yet, I've been stuck behind a senior who clearly can walk down the jet bridge at more than a snail's pace. It seems that the only way to get on ahead of First Class is to be in a wheelchair and need one of the "wheelchair pushers" to help in boarding.

As someone who used to have a small child, it was much easier to board ahead of First Class, and then strap the car seat into the window seat, and then strap the kid into the car seat. There is no easy way to do that without blocking the aisle.

Again, I have seen people abuse the boarding process by taking children who are 7,8,9, and 10 and boarding after the call for families with small children.

It's these two classes of passengers that can slow up boarding, especially if they board within a boarding group, rather than being put on ahead of general boarding, the elites, or First Class.


25 sphealey : Ah, but I didn't say bag fees. I agree with your timeline, which is when the average time to receive one's luggage at the carousel started going from
26 Woof : Often quite a bit longer than 60 seconds, and that time can save over an hour in the immigration queue at some destinations (Phnom Penh and Kiev to n
27 Grid : True that.
28 par13del : You do realise that you are on an airline fan site and everyone here knows what those letters mean and where they are located on an a/c. One of the i
29 44k : No, its actually down from 6 groups to 4. I must disagree. I started working in 2006, and back in those days we almost never used to check gate bags
30 ikramerica : J or F tickets have the word BUSINESS, FIRST CLASS, or something similar printed on them, in big letters, so that the F/As and ground staff can easil
31 Post contains images displane : My favorite boarding style was I believe, Shuttle by United where they boarded outside in- windows, middle then aisle seats. No more waiting in the ai
32 vhtje : Yes I do realise that; that is why I used them in the post. As ikramerica points out, it is clearly stated on your boarding pass in which class you a
33 par13del : Based on the initial post, it seemed to me that the person who did not know where they were going was the pax, he may well have known he was in J, bu
34 exFWAOONW : I can tell the replies of people who have never worked at the airport. Some people only know they're supposed to be on a plane. They think it leaves f
35 Post contains images apache323 : In the Army they load us very quickly into an MD-11 even with our bags and rifles. You have a few people yelling at you to get to the back and they po
36 flyby519 : I think there should be one boarding group, "Allllll Aboard!" Those frequent fliers and well versed travellers (also known as 'gate lice'!) will be th
37 laxboeingman : Seems to make sense because the last people should be the first on the plane, which makes boarding easier, and why would the first class pax want to
38 ikramerica : Free drink, better than sitting in the gate area. But true, many in F will board only a few minutes before doors are to close. They stay in the clubs
39 cschleic : This is effectively done by some by providing for boarding priority by fare basis, when more overhead space is available. While it doesn't always wor
40 flylku : Who's on the flight may be the most important determinant of all. In the State's I'll take a full Shuttle flight (DCA-LGA-BOS) any day over a half ful
41 DeltaMD90 : Does anyone see a day when they board from the front and back? I'm just assuming it's too much money to have 2 jetways...
42 flyby519 : Not to mention the pain in the butt trying to communicate to the pax seated in the back half that they need to go down a different jetbridge and all
43 Rafabozzolla : That's not a problem at all. Outside the US, where bus boarding is fairly common, pax are told to board and deplane from front and rear doors (accord
44 dynamicsguy : It already happens here in Australia. Both Jetstar and Virgin Australia do it, with the jetway for the front and stairs for the back. From my anecdot
45 SkyPriorityDTW : The root of all of the problems is the carry-on bag as many have stated above. At DL, this is a constant problem and I cannot tell you how many studie
46 AAR90 : AA has commissioned three such studies during my employment with AA. Not sure if this is one of them, but the result is the same. The general America
47 RoundPeg : There is a new boarding procedure which is much faster. Basically it is the seating plan of the plane printed on a carpet laid in the departure lounge
48 wn700driver : Your idea may have some pluses and minuses, but as a practical matter, it is impossible to apply, more so to enforce. What would really happen is tha
49 AA767400 : At the end of the day, it has nothing to do with the boarding process. When are these airlines going to learn? It has to do with letting passengers br
50 Post contains images exFWAOONW : Like those self-check-in kiosks can police carry-ons like we did when every pax had to check-in face to face with an agent. The accountants brought t
51 SouthernDC9 : But airlines wouldn't stop charging, they would just add $25 or so to the cost of a ticket and everybody would pay for checked bags whether they chec
52 AA767400 : That still does not solve the problem of bringing oversized, and multiple bags onboard an aircraft. They can board in 100 different ways, but when yo
53 SouthernDC9 : I've flown WN a couple of times recently, and I have seen people carry on enormous bags - as someone said above, I don't think it's completely about
54 RoundPeg : It's almost unanimous that carry-on bags, whether too big or too many, is a major factor in slowing down the boarding process, and most agree (includi
55 fiscal : The most efficient boarding I have seen was on an AirAsiaX flight from Perth to Kuala Lumper. They called rows from the back forward, and policed it a
56 777STL : That's not the fault of the boarding system, just stupid people.
57 Post contains images HiFlyerAS : Totally spot-on! I'm a Flight Attendant and can attest to the theory that it's all about the carry-on bags. I make an announcement during boarding th
58 GBan : I think comments like this are a bit unfair, insulting and arrogant. Maybe this guy was flying for the first time? My dad has never seen an aircraft
59 Post contains images brilondon : I know I live in the US and have to endure your love of American football. I only wish to reiterate my previous post if that when you have specific b
60 planesailing : As a gate agent, it can be hard work to get passengers down to the plane for boarding. The flights I deal with are called 1 hour before departure, an
61 nyc2theworld : Lets take another example. ATM Machines and Tellers. Do you think there are the same number of tellers today that were 25 years ago? (Or even the sam
62 ckfred : Two things have slowed down boarding over the years. First is the use of only one door for boarding. Back in the 60s, it was common to park aircarf pa
63 Post contains images HiFlyerAS : You brought back some memories! Back when we flew the -27's we didn't operate with minimum cabin crew like today and everyone didn't have to be physi
64 flashmeister : Southwest does this at some stations today using airstairs at the rear doors. I've boarded and deplaned this way at BUR, for example.
65 ikramerica : This is SOP for B6. It sucks in some situations. Not everyone wants to carry their luggage up and down stairs to speed up the boarding process or "sa
66 RoundPeg : One generic Flying Carpet would certainly suffice for all single-aisle aircraft, which are by far the most common type. The size for a Flying Carpet
67 dynamicsguy : Do you want to have a think about whether those number make sense? I don't care what the computer models say, I don't see how it would be possible to
68 SchorschNG : And too much effort, and probably you get issues with other parts of the turn-around. And finally, there are easier solutions. And the trend is irrev
69 Post contains images quiet1 : It's almost laughable. Say 13, 14 &15ABCDEF, 16ABDEF, and 17 18 & 19 ABCDEF are all lined up. Then 16C shows up with all his/her attendant ca
70 ikramerica : They must have been on the Tower of Terror ride one too many times and thought "why can't they board aircraft this way!" Of course, the reasons are:
71 voltage : I thought that there was a study that said a single, wider aisle would board faster than twin aisle since the line could continue to move past slower
72 ikramerica : I don't know, but on a QF 743 flight SYD-PER, they didn't call rows, just called boarding. The wide door and double aisles, even with a full flight a
73 tugger : Airlines don't "use the masses" to make up numbers, the masses ARE the airlines numbers. Without "the masses" that many deride, the airlines would go
74 RoundPeg : It definitely is laughable, most people who have tried out the Flying Carpet like it and can't resist smiling or chuckling when they realise its down
75 ikramerica : That's one heavy carry on! I just don't like the idea of being stuck on stairs holding a bag, with another person in front of me banging me in the fa
76 SchorschNG : Never heard of that one. The only study I know found no correlation between aisle width and boarding speed. If you look at an aisle at 18 or 20 inch
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
AA Komen Pink Ribbon 777 Is Here! posted Tue Sep 16 2008 08:45:32 by AA767400
AA Boarding Total 4/6 posted Fri Apr 4 2008 20:53:05 by CALMSP
Why Boarding On European Carrier Is More Rushed? posted Tue Feb 12 2008 18:36:51 by HAMAD
AA Boarding @ GRR (Grand Rapids) posted Mon Jan 14 2008 15:06:00 by SuseJ772
Airline Interior Quality -- Which Is Best? posted Wed Sep 12 2007 17:22:18 by Jakeflyer
AA 930 GRU-MIA What Is Going On? posted Mon Oct 9 2006 01:28:16 by Sflaflight
And JetBlue Is Best Again! posted Tue Jul 11 2006 23:04:31 by JetBlueNYFL
AA Channel 6; "What We Love Best" posted Thu May 4 2006 20:27:14 by AIR757200
AA Boarding Questions And Comments. posted Tue Mar 28 2006 18:14:28 by STLTower
Which Airline Is Best To Fly For? posted Mon Jun 27 2005 21:19:13 by NWairlnk07