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Woman Gives Birth On Philippines-To-SFO Flight  
User currently offlineferminbrif From Venezuela, joined Dec 2010, 97 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 4956 times:

Hi everybody!!!
I am a little bit curious about this news. Although the woman gave birth over international airspace (I guess), I would like to know where is going the baby be considered to be from?
I mean, will it be considered to be a citizen from The Philippines or from the U.S.A.?
Besides, how in the world the local authorities at the airport diddn´t realized that woman was pregnant?
Has it happend before?
Thanks a lot.

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/201...irth-on-philippines-to-sfo-flight/

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineOH-LGA From Denmark, joined Oct 1999, 1436 posts, RR: 20
Reply 1, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 4909 times:

If I recall correctly, if the aircraft is in international airspace when a child is born then I think it reverts to the country the aircraft is registered in...? This is most likely an RP- registered aircraft, so the child would be considered a Filipino citizen.

Onboard births have occurred on rare occasion. Most airlines don't permit pregnant women to fly within the last 4-6 weeks of pregnancy, and before that they require a doctor's note for a certain period that the pregnancy is a normal one and no complications/premature birth is expected. When I worked check-in we would ask how long she had been pregnant and asked for documentation, if necessary.

I mean, on here we all love planes but I really doubt we'd want to be born in one  



Head in the clouds... yet feet planted firmly on the ground.
User currently offlineGrid From Kazakhstan, joined Apr 2010, 624 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 4324 times:

Yes, she was nine months pregnant so it's not like the baby was premature. Perhaps her father is seriously ill, but a trip to visit him seems awfully risky for the child. Of course, maybe she also wanted her baby to be a U.S. citizen.


ATR72 E120 E140 E170 E190 Q200 717 727 737 747 757 767 777 A319 A320 A321 A330 A340 MD11 MD82 MD83 MD88 MD90
User currently offlinebjorn14 From Norway, joined Feb 2010, 3369 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 4112 times:

Quoting OH-LGA (Reply 1):
If I recall correctly, if the aircraft is in international airspace when a child is born then I think it reverts to the country the aircraft is registered in.

Yes this is true. So "Francis" will not be a USA citizen by virtue of this event. He missed it by 3 hours. If he was on a UA or DL flight then welcome to America.



"I want to know the voice of God the rest is just details" --A. Einstein
User currently offlinebjorn14 From Norway, joined Feb 2010, 3369 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 4046 times:

The mother knew her due date was September 28th so she was planning on having her baby in the US. but "Francis" didn't cooperate.


"I want to know the voice of God the rest is just details" --A. Einstein
User currently offlineapodino From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 4228 posts, RR: 6
Reply 5, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3897 times:

Quoting bjorn14 (Reply 4):
The mother knew her due date was September 28th so she was planning on having her baby in the US. but "Francis" didn't cooperate.

That is exactly it, she wanted the baby to be a US citizen, so she wanted to have the baby in the US, where her sister lives.

Congrats to the proud mother though. Truly a great miracle, and I say that no matter how many times it happens.


User currently offlineScottB From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 6696 posts, RR: 32
Reply 6, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3750 times:

Quoting apodino (Reply 5):
That is exactly it, she wanted the baby to be a US citizen

The not-so-politically-correct term is "anchor baby." I saw an interview last night on the local news with her sister, who lives in a Boston suburb; the sister openly stated that she was "emigrating" to the U.S. so that her baby could be a U.S. citizen (and she would be allowed to stay as his mother).

Quoting ferminbrif (Thread starter):
Besides, how in the world the local authorities at the airport diddn´t realized that woman was pregnant?

I'm wondering how in the world was she granted a visa to travel to the U.S. to have an anchor baby.


User currently offlinejfidler From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 350 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3658 times:

Quoting ScottB (Reply 6):
The not-so-politically-correct term is "anchor baby." I saw an interview last night on the local news with her sister, who lives in a Boston suburb; the sister openly stated that she was "emigrating" to the U.S. so that her baby could be a U.S. citizen (and she would be allowed to stay as his mother).

From my understanding, she can't stay past her current visa (likely a tourist visa) and would have to go back to her home country. When the child (being a US citizen) is 21 years old, the child can apply for their mother and father to come to the US legally. So that's a lot of work and waiting.

Getting this back a bit on topic, how much scrutiny is given to noticeably pregnant women at the airport? Is it something the check-in desk or gate agent is supposed to consider?


User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10864 posts, RR: 38
Reply 8, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3647 times:

Nice story. The child would be a Filipino being born on a Filipino aircraft over international air space.
Happy to hear it all ended well for the mother and child.

I guess the TSA had some extra checking and patting down work when the woman landed with the newborn and her other child. I hope they did not make them go through the airport naked scanners!



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlinekl911 From Ireland, joined Jul 2003, 5113 posts, RR: 12
Reply 9, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3616 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 8):
I guess the TSA had some extra checking and patting down work when the woman landed with the newborn and her other child. I hope they did not make them go through the airport naked scanners!

Lol, no difference for the baby, dont think it was wearing anything anyway.  



Next trip : DUB-AUH-CGK-DPS-KUL-AUH-CDG-ORK :-)
User currently offlineScottB From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 6696 posts, RR: 32
Reply 10, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3549 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 8):
I guess the TSA had some extra checking and patting down work when the woman landed with the newborn and her other child.

TSA wouldn't be screening arriving passengers unless they were connecting to another flight, and I imagine the mother's connection was to an ambulance.


User currently offlineCODCAIAH From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 176 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 3080 times:

What does the mom do when she arrives at the immigration checkpoint with a new baby and no passport for this newly-born airline passenger? Does ICE have a policy for this?

User currently offlineEDICHC From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 3042 times:

Quoting OH-LGA (Reply 1):

If I recall correctly, if the aircraft is in international airspace when a child is born then I think it reverts to the country the aircraft is registered in...?

While I believe this to be correct, last time I was in the Phils I noticed that many of PR's fleet have registrations in countries other than the Philippines (probably due to leasing arrangements). The two I recall were French and Irish registration. So what happens then if this is case if it was an F or EI registered aircraft?


User currently offlinePITingres From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 1115 posts, RR: 13
Reply 13, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2740 times:

Quoting ScottB (Reply 6):
how much scrutiny is given to noticeably pregnant women at the airport?

I've no clue what the "rules" are, but any such scrutiny is doomed to failure IMHO. Women carry fetuses differently, and even the presence of Braxton-Hicks contractions is no reliable indicator of delivery date. With our 3rd, my wife looked hugely pregnant at 7 months while our neighbor looked like maybe she had gained a pound. She delivered (normally) a month before us!

I'm sure that if anyone had uncovered any clue as to when babies were coming, the Ob-Gyn community would be on it. The worst hours, the greatest rewards...



Fly, you fools! Fly!
User currently offlineYYZRWY23 From Canada, joined Aug 2009, 561 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (2 years 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2740 times:

Quoting CODCAIAH (Reply 11):
What does the mom do when she arrives at the immigration checkpoint with a new baby and no passport for this newly-born airline passenger?

I don't think she goes to the checkpoint. I get the feeling that the aircraft is met by ICE and paramedics. ICE would check her documents, know full well the baby won't have any documents, and then paramedics would transport her to the nearest medical facility.

YYZRWY23



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