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Biggest Plane With Floats?  
User currently offlineesgg From Sweden, joined Feb 2006, 51 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 15803 times:

It would be interesting to see a 747 with floats, but I suspect that I have to wait a looong time to see that.
But my simple question as the title says: Biggest plane with floats?

35 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8735 posts, RR: 42
Reply 1, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15803 times:

That would be the Hughes H-4 Hercules, if I'm not mistaken.


Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlinesteelhead From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 135 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15788 times:

I don't think this qualifies as a float-plane. But I have seen pictures of a DC-3 on floats

User currently offlinesteelhead From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 135 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15795 times:

I found the link with pictures:

http://www.dc3history.org/floats.htm


User currently offlineArniepie From Belgium, joined Aug 2005, 1265 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15775 times:

Quoting aloges (Reply 1):
That would be the Hughes H-4 Hercules, if I'm not mistaken.

Interestingly I saw this quote about the Hercules;
"Some critics of Howard Hughes' massive Spruce Goose claim that the famous flying boat's first (and only) flight was due entirely to wing in ground effect and that the craft was incapable of sustaining flight above a very low altitude. It is probably true that the Spruce Goose was underpowered in its current configuration."

So if we're to take ground effect planes also as possible candidates.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lun-class_ekranoplan

Which was both longer and much heavier than the spruce goose



[edit post]
User currently offlinegemuser From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 5763 posts, RR: 6
Reply 5, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15731 times:

Quoting aloges (Reply 1):
That would be the Hughes H-4 Hercules, if I'm not mistaken.

Definitely NOT a float plane!
AFAIK the C-47(not DC3) float plane was the largest aircraft ever put on floats.
See: http://www.wunderground.com/wximage/...image&handle=steamlaunch&number=32


Gemuser



DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8735 posts, RR: 42
Reply 6, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15724 times:

I've found another plane that I had vaguely remembered along with the Spruce Goose: the Martin Mars. What makes this type interesting is that it has survived in active service to this day, so it should be quite an experience watching one of these planes.


Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8735 posts, RR: 42
Reply 7, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15707 times:

Quoting gemuser (Reply 5):
Definitely NOT a float plane!

I don't think there's a need for yelling - the OP might be interested in flying boats just as much, since he didn't specify "only land aircraft converted to marine use". Wouldn't it be nice if we could simply exchange information on interesting aircraft without fighting over which of them better fits a definition?



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineBurkhard From Germany, joined Nov 2006, 4405 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15633 times:

What about the Dornier X - it actually had some very successful long range flights.

User currently offlineVV701 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 7695 posts, RR: 17
Reply 9, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15583 times:

The Saunders Roe Princess was not a float plane. It was a flying boat. However it did have retractable wing-tip floats. It is therefore in the mix to be considered to be the "biggest plane with floats".

This four and three quarter minute video tells the life story of the three 10-engined turbo-prop Princesses:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AV1eUeo27tc


User currently offlineArniepie From Belgium, joined Aug 2005, 1265 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15578 times:

another big conventionalairplane converted to floatplane possiblilty, but never came to realization
http://www.g2mil.com/c130seaplane.htm

Quote:
Lockheed-Martin developed a "floatplane" conversion kit that allows a C-130 Hercules to operate from water



[edit post]
User currently offlineTCASAlert From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 15565 times:

The Beriev BE-200 is a biggy too, albeit not on the scale of the Ekranoplan, but it at least performs as a regular aircraft.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/21/MChS_Beriev_Be-200_waterbomber.jpg/800px-MChS_Beriev_Be-200_waterbomber.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beriev_Be-200


User currently offlineBE77 From Canada, joined Nov 2007, 455 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 15565 times:

Quoting aloges (Reply 6):
it should be quite an experience watching one of these planes.

Yep, it is  
Many (including me) see them at the Sproat Lake base, and once on a tour we were allowed to walk and climb around inside.
Also one year a a large Forest Industry Convention in Vancouver, they had one doing water drop circuits at CXH for an hour or so on at least two days, so anyone in downtown Vancouver saw it doing it's thing. Even the non-a.nuts in the office I was in thought it was cool.
Fun fact - CXH controllers could look 'down' at a Mars doing water drops as the tower is over 450 feet above sea level.



Tower, Affirmitive, gear is down and welded
User currently offlineesgg From Sweden, joined Feb 2006, 51 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 15548 times:

I really didn´t want to start an argument of what is a floatplane or not.   My definition is simply a plane that does NOT flot on its own body! The floating is achieved by floats mounted the same way as an ordinary landing gear.
I.e. the Saunders-Roe Princess does not qualify as an answer to my question.


User currently offlinecorey07850 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2528 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 15502 times:

This video never gets old

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJ6zTZuq5zw


User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 7030 posts, RR: 46
Reply 15, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 15427 times:

Quoting corey07850 (Reply 14):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJ6zTZuq5zw

This brings back memories-in 1999, when I was running the VSF FBO, one of the friends I made had several Albatrosses, and he was flying one to the Greenville fly-in, and invited me to come along. I flew my 182, as he wanted to get some air-to-air videos of the Albatross. It wasn't a particularly good weekend weather-wise, but we did get some good air-to-air videos on the first day. On the second day we were pretty much socked in most of the day (the Albatross was at the airport, not on the water) but towards the end of the day the weather lifted enough for us to go down for some water landings. I got to ride on the Albatross this time; we buzzed the seaplane base and went out to land on the open water (the regular landing area was too confined for the Albatross.) We were just landing when several of us saw what looked to be an overturned boat with two people clinging to it dead ahead. That is exactly what it turned out to be, and we rescued them. They were both hypothermic, and probably would not have lasted had not someone come along, and there weren't very many other boats out that day. This incident got a half-page writeup in Flying magazine; it was nice that the Albatross got to again fulfill its original purpose.



The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlineVV701 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 7695 posts, RR: 17
Reply 16, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 15294 times:

Quoting esgg (Reply 13):
the Saunders-Roe Princess does not qualify as an answer to my question.

So did you ask the wrong question?

You said::

Quoting esgg (Thread starter):
But my simple question as the title says: Biggest plane with floats?

My simple and possible answer was the Saunders Roe Princess.

Note that the Princess was certainly big.

Note that the Princess flew at the Farnborough Air Show and on many other occasions, so it was certainly a plane.

Also note in the video that the Princess was very clearly fitted with two retractable floats, one on the end of each wing.

So exactly how does the Princess not "qualify" to be considered as the "Biggest plane with floats"?


User currently offlineesgg From Sweden, joined Feb 2006, 51 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 15182 times:

There may be a slight misunderstanding here, or, a difference between swedish and english vocabulary.
From my swedish point of wiev a flotplane does not flot on its body, it uses floats.

A seaplane floats on its body and may use floats on the vingtips to keep balance in the water. But it is
no floatplane, it is a seaplane (or a flying boat).

I hope this clarifies.


User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8735 posts, RR: 42
Reply 18, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 15149 times:

Quoting esgg (Reply 13):
My definition is simply a plane that does NOT flot on its own body! The floating is achieved by floats mounted the same way as an ordinary landing gear.

Thanks! That clarifies it.

Size-wise, this Italian attempt comes close to the DC-3:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CANT_Z.509
but it was much lighter than the Douglas aircraft. So perhaps the DC-3 is actually your answer, every larger seaplane that I could find was a flying boat.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineflipdewaf From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2006, 1578 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 15119 times:
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Quoting VV701 (Reply 16):

I think this one is bigger


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Gil Yu



  

Fred


User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 7030 posts, RR: 46
Reply 20, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 15080 times:

Quoting flipdewaf (Reply 19):
I think this one is bigger

It might have a little difficulty taking off, however. 



The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlineRubberJungle From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 14955 times:

Can't recall whether the Ju 52 might have topped the DC-3 in terms of wing-span...

http://www.lordadmiral.com/WWII/0035-GermanPlane0003.JPG


User currently offlineNASCARAirforce From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 3184 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 14837 times:

I think what the original poster meant was not a plane that built for the purpose of being a float plane - ie Amphibian

The Bereiv B-200, the Spruce Goose, the Grumman Albatross, Goose, Duck, Widgeon, the big flying boats of the 40s/50s etc were amphibians - built as a purpose to operate on land or water.

What the poster means is a plane that was built as purpose to operate from land only, but someone popped on some floats on the bottom - like the various high wing Cessnas, DHC-6, Beech 18, DC-3, various LSAs etc.


User currently offlinesteelhead From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 135 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days ago) and read 14627 times:

Looks like the JU-52/3m beats the DC-3/C-47 in relation to wingspan by a few cm, but on the other side the DC-3/C-47 is the overall heavier plane.

User currently offlineMD-90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 8508 posts, RR: 12
Reply 24, posted (3 years 1 month 1 week 5 days ago) and read 14367 times:

I think the S.20 Mercury would be a candidate. Its max gross (26,800 lbs) was barely more than the DC-3 but it is a smaller plane by wingspan and length. It certainly would win the category of the longest flight ever by a floatplane: 6045 miles.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v284/Fleetwing1627/MM_Short_Mayo_Composite_scan.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v284/Fleetwing1627/Maia_and_Mercury_August_1938_Our_Generation_1938.jpg


25 Post contains links and images tugger : I believe this is the biggest float plane: CANT Z.511 Unfortunately she had a short production life as she became a victim of WWII. But she did fly an
26 Post contains links and images MD-90 : I love that link, Tugger. Never heard of that plane before.
27 HarleyDriver : I used to see this airplane on a fairly regular basis while fishing on Moosehead Lake in Maine which is where I am from. I loved seeing it at Folsoms
28 Post contains links and images signol : I may be getting the wrong idea, but in British English: Seaplane = plane that floats on water on floats extended from the fuselage. Flying boat = pl
29 Post contains images cainanuk : There you go.... a 747... WITH floats. Here endeth thread!
30 Post contains links and images akelley728 : Another four-engined float plane, the Blohm & Voss Ha 139: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blohm_%26_Voss_Ha_139 http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchi
31 fanofjets : That's a new one for me, as well! Thanks for the post. My initial guess was that DC-3; I have seen many pictures of that bird. I had the Ju-52 for se
32 flightsimer : Nope, C-130 takes the cake for a design as Lockheed made a conversion kit for them to have two floats under the plane. However I'm not sure any were a
33 VV701 : That is certain ly clear from his subsequent comments. Indeed it was always a possibility which is why, when putting the Saunders Roe Princess forwar
34 Viscount724 : My assumption, and I would guess the assumption of 90% of the other readers of this thread, was that the reference to "floats" referred to aircraft w
35 Post contains images VV701 : Thanks for your lesson! I'm sorry you think I got it the wrong way round. Would it have been better if I had explained what the Princess was before I
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