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Graduate Recruitment In Airline/Airport Industry  
User currently offlineocin From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2011, 2 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 4197 times:

Hi all,

I have been an avid reader of the forums for a while and decided to become a first class member after seeing how helpful and informative the site is.

Please excuse my first post being a request for information..


As a recent MBA graduate (Business Management) with a dissertation on customer services in national carriers behind me I've recently taken on my first full time role as a Key Accounts Executive at a well known travel agency. While I am happy with the role, my dream of working in the aviation industry in a business-related capacity is ever present.

My question to all of you working in the airline/airport business is, what sort of positions are available to someone with my background? I want to apply to the MAG Group and TUI graduate schemes when they reopen, but failing that what is the best route into the industry - internships, work experience, consulting firms?

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I've drawn up a list of 'dream companies' I'd like to work for. These include Virgin, Airbus, TUI and MAG Group.

I have searched for previous similar posts on the forum, but most are dated 6-10 years ago!

I am a British National, with Cypriot background.



Thanks in advance!

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinemalaysia From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 3329 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 4012 times:

I envy you, Id have loved to get into those International Graduate and Professional programs that exist with some airlines outside the US.

Sadly where I am, an MBA means nothing to a US Airline. The only way I see those with MBA working for US airlines is just for the flight benefits, the pay does not match well for the education.

I notice that some Middle East Carriers and some such as SQ have had some professional programs for graduate level workers.

If I were in your case, but just take it with a grain of salt. try to see if you can get a part-time job entry-level with an airline while you maintain your regular full-time job. then once you are in the airline, you can now view and see all the "INTERNAL" job opportunities, to be honest, many airlines have so many "internal" jobs available while they have so little "externally" and several are Management and Director level in all departments, ironically they are trying to get an internal candidate, but very few would qualify though cause most whom start with the airline nowadays may have just high school diplomas and rarely a Bachelor degree.



There Are Those Who Believe That There May Yet Be Other Airlines Who Even Now Fight To Survive Beyond The Heavens
User currently offlineusdcaguy From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 935 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (2 years 7 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3871 times:

Quoting malaysia (Reply 1):
Sadly where I am, an MBA means nothing to a US Airline. The only way I see those with MBA working for US airlines is just for the flight benefits, the pay does not match well for the education.

The idea that airlines do not pay as well is a big misnomer. Pay is generally competitive with other industries for similar jobs, but joining a carrier through an MBA program can be very tough. Many students will apply at the few schools each carrier recruits from, but then very few from that pile of candidates will ever see an offer. For that reason, it is often easier to apply to somewhat "boring" or "entry-level" jobs off the street (this could mean being a basic analyst or agency support rep, etc.) and then "work your way up". Having an MBA is rather banal these days, and those with a master's should not expect special treatment but rather a small edge over other candidates.

Does anyone have experience with starting a management career at carriers outside the US? What is the easiest way to get your foot in the door?

[Edited 2011-11-22 11:29:26]

User currently offlineocin From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2011, 2 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3540 times:

Thanks for all your help so far. I have been proactive this week and applied to jobs with EY and other airlines. Does anyone have any first-hand experience of moving up the career ladder in the UK with airlines or airports?

My MBA was really a personal achievement that I tailored toward aviation with my degree. I know it only gives a slight edge but it is an edge all the same.

Does anyone have links to travel industry recruiters or job alert sites in the UK/EU?

Thanks


User currently offlineSkidMarque From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 86 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (2 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3502 times:

Could I draw you attention to this ?

http://www.britishairwaysjobs.com/baweb1/

Graduate opportunties, plus IT apprenticeship scheme now recruiting.



DUCK !
User currently offlineWestJet747 From Canada, joined Aug 2011, 1830 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (2 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3251 times:

I appreciate the post ocin, as I am in a similar position!

One strategy I've known people to do is: A) get your pilot's license, and work as an instructor at a flight school, then apply to airlines now that you have aviation experience under your belt, or B) Start as a FA or Customer Service Rep, even a Ramp Agent, and work you're way up.

James Hogan, CEO of EY, started his career behind the check-in counter at MEL working for Ansett.

I have looked into the Graduate Program at AC, but there *may* be language requirements. Certainly doesn't hurt to throw them a resume and put your name out there though!

Good luck on your hunt!



Flying refined.
User currently offlineUAL747DEN From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2392 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (2 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 3191 times:

I have experience at a few airlines and I can say that it's always much easier to get promoted to a high level position from within. Also of note, at least from my experience with US based airlines, is that when you are doing a great job at one airline the others will notice. If you work hard and bring new ideas to your airline everyone else will take note and do what it takes to recruit you. I was one of the lucky people who benefited from this concept, United took note of my hard work at another airline and had their head hunter work pretty hard to bring me over. Now with that said it is true that you will most likely make less money in the airline industry than you might in another sector for the same level of work, however the airline industry can offer some perks that you will not find anywhere else!

I hope you find what you are looking for. Just remember that in the beginning it might not be exactly what you want but if you work your ass off everyday someone will notice your work and you will be able to move your way up from there!



/// UNITED AIRLINES
User currently offlinemalaysia From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 3329 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 7 months 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2981 times:

If you are a good worker and have good education but nobody really recognizes you, the hard truth at moving up is to either transfer to a promotion at another location within the airline or move to another airline for a higher position


There Are Those Who Believe That There May Yet Be Other Airlines Who Even Now Fight To Survive Beyond The Heavens
User currently offlineAirStairs From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 487 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (2 years 7 months 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2965 times:

If you lean towards Econ/Stats within your MBA, some airlines' Pricing/Revenue Management groups would likely take a good second look at you. I was offered a paid internship with a medium-sized domestic airline in revenue management as a sophomore undergrad in Econ, so it's certainly doable.

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