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Will A350 Have Similar Delays To B787?  
User currently offlineUnited727 From United States of America, joined Nov 2010, 412 posts, RR: 1
Posted (3 years 1 week 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 13825 times:

Exactly what is the current status of the A350 and its sub-variants? Is there any speculation that A will be plagued by the similar issues that B and the 787 has seen over the past years? If so, what are the current debilitating issues? Will the economy, in the fragile condition its in currently, make delays of this program even more challenging to UA and the OAL's waiting for these units to upgrade their fleets in the upcoming years?

[Edited 2011-12-06 13:35:30]


Looking for the impossible way to save those dying breeds!!!!
94 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinegigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 1, posted (3 years 1 week 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 13806 times:

There is a simple 6 month delay as of now.

No information is available to indicate a futher delay.

The plane enters the FAL soon.

There's no point in speculating without any facts.

NS


User currently offlineUnited727 From United States of America, joined Nov 2010, 412 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (3 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 13783 times:

Quoting gigneil (Reply 1):
There is a simple 6 month delay as of now.

IIRC, Boeing had a few "Simple" delays too.  



Looking for the impossible way to save those dying breeds!!!!
User currently offlinegigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 3, posted (3 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 13691 times:

And, over time, we gained a lot more information about that, which made speculation possible.

We simply don't have any now. None exists.

NS


User currently offlineYTZ From Canada, joined Jun 2009, 2355 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (3 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 13563 times:

I don't think there's enough out to quantify the delays.

But as for UA taking delivery, who knows? Sometimes, delays are a blessing in disguise. Would airlines in such poor shape over the last few years really be able to take delivery of all those aircraft? UA might well be happy with a short delay (even if they complain about it publicly...).


User currently offlinefrigatebird From Netherlands, joined Jun 2008, 1715 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (3 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 13561 times:

Quoting gigneil (Reply 1):
There is a simple 6 month delay as of now.

Originally, EIS of the A350-900 in its current XWB form was Q2 2013. It's now Q2 2014, so the delay is 1 year. 6 months was its most recent delay, but it had already suffered a previous 6 months delay to Q4 2013.

Although I don't rule out any further slippages, I'm confident it won't lead to the disastrous 3,5 years of the 787. Contrary to the 787, the A350 isn't rushed into a fake roll-out, of just an empty shell with temporary fasteners purchased in a hardware store around the corner. Airbus will make sure it can manufacture a mature product from the first frames onwards. It's sad that the generous development time they took still isn't enough, but the end result will be a much smoother production ramp-up than the 787 and A380.



146,318/19/20/21,AB6,332,343,345,388,722,732/3/4/5/G/8,9,742,74E,744,752,762,763,772,77E,773,77W,AT4/7,ATP,CRK,E90,F50/7
User currently offlinezeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9229 posts, RR: 76
Reply 6, posted (3 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 13495 times:

Quoting frigatebird (Reply 5):

Originally, EIS of the A350-900 in its current XWB form was Q2 2013. It's now Q2 2014, so the delay is 1 year. 6 months was its most recent delay, but it had already suffered a previous 6 months delay to Q4 2013.

While that is technically correct, the number of aircraft that were due for delivery in 2013 was only 6 all for QR. That is less than a months production at the normal production rate.

Airbus did not have ambitious production ramp up plans for the A350.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlinegigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 7, posted (3 years 1 week 6 days ago) and read 13489 times:

Quoting YTZ (Reply 4):
Sometimes, delays are a blessing in disguise. Would airlines in such poor shape over the last few years really be able to take delivery of all those aircraft?

United is going to have made one billion dollars in profit this year. They the most profitable US airline and one of the most profitable in the world.

There is no reason whatsoever to believe they won't take the planes. In fact, Jeff Smisek mentions them often during appearances and in internal announcements.

So there's that.

NS


User currently offlineikramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21580 posts, RR: 59
Reply 8, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 13302 times:

Quoting frigatebird (Reply 5):
the disastrous 3,5 years

technically, it was 3.25 years. Not like it matters.

Quoting zeke (Reply 6):
While that is technically correct, the number of aircraft that were due for delivery in 2013 was only 6 all for QR. That is less than a months production at the normal production rate.

Why does that matter? We don't know if the same would happen in 2014, with only 6 deliveries. Looks like 6 is an ambitious number for the 787 program this year...



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineABpositive From Australia, joined Nov 2005, 227 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 13280 times:

Quoting gigneil (Reply 1):
There's no point in speculating without any facts.

We might as well close the a.net forum then...


User currently offlinegigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 10, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 13265 times:

Quoting ABpositive (Reply 9):
We might as well close the a.net forum then...

We could instead just moderate those posts more accurately.

NS


User currently offlinen1786b From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 560 posts, RR: 17
Reply 11, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 13249 times:

Quoting frigatebird (Reply 5):
Originally, EIS of the A350-900 in its current XWB form was Q2 2013. It's now Q2 2014, so the delay is 1 year. 6 months was its most recent delay, but it had already suffered a previous 6 months delay to Q4 2013.

Well, not counting the non-xwb versions of the A350, let's see what they had to say when they launched it.

http://www.airbus.com/newsevents/new...-body-family-for-the-21st-century/

Entry into service for the A350-900 is foreseen for 2012.


User currently offlineUnited727 From United States of America, joined Nov 2010, 412 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 13243 times:

Quoting gigneil (Reply 3):
We simply don't have any now. None exists.

So one wonders... Is A is keeping information about the A350 from the public for a reason????

Quoting zeke (Reply 6):
Airbus did not have ambitious production ramp up plans for the A350.

That's past tense...is this still the case?

Quoting gigneil (Reply 7):
There is no reason whatsoever to believe they won't take the planes. In fact, Jeff Smisek mentions them often during appearances and in internal announcements.

I get slight the impression you are ever so slightly "sensitive" about UA discussions and its ops.    In YZK's defense, he never said that UA won't take the planes, IIRC he merely made a remark questioning if they would take all that they ordered.

As for UA, nothing to be sensitive about...I'm a pre-9/11 airline brat from the "real" UA (back in the day). UA is nothing but a shell of its namesake from the glory days of long ago.



Looking for the impossible way to save those dying breeds!!!!
User currently offlinezeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9229 posts, RR: 76
Reply 13, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 12910 times:

Quoting ikramerica (Reply 8):

Why does that matter?

Because the number of deliveries planned in the first years was very low, they have a very good chance of recovering from the delay very quickly.

Quoting ikramerica (Reply 8):
We don't know if the same would happen in 2014, with only 6 deliveries.

And they could also deliver all those aircraft plus the planned aircraft for 2014 in 2014.

Quoting ikramerica (Reply 8):
Looks like 6 is an ambitious number for the 787 program this year...

If you want to discuss the 787, please pick a 787 thread, there are various 787 production threads.

Quoting United727 (Reply 12):

That's past tense...is this still the case?

Yes.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently onlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31387 posts, RR: 85
Reply 14, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 12871 times:
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While not as ambitious as Boeing (who in 2008 intended to deliver 109 planes within 18 months), Airbus' original production plan was 18 in 2013, 51 in 2014 and 83 in 2015.

So if Airbus is now planning 6 deliveries by the end of 2014, that would be a significant cut.


User currently offlinezeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9229 posts, RR: 76
Reply 15, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 12838 times:

Quoting Stitch (Reply 14):
While not as ambitious as Boeing (who in 2008 intended to deliver 109 planes within 18 months),

If you want to discuss the 787 production issues, take it to the 787 production thread.

Quoting Stitch (Reply 14):
Airbus' original production plan was 18 in 2013, 51 in 2014 and 83 in 2015.

Where did you pull those numbers from ? The Ascend data base does not show anything like that number for the A350.

Quoting Stitch (Reply 14):
So if Airbus is now planning 6 deliveries by the end of 2014, that would be a significant cut.

Where did you pull the "now planning 6 deliveries by the end of 2014" number from ?



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlinegigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 16, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 12798 times:

Quoting zeke (Reply 13):
If you want to discuss the 787, please pick a 787 thread, there are various 787 production threads.

Meow sir. Calm down. Comparing the two programs makes some sense.  

NS


User currently offlinegigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 17, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 12790 times:

Quoting United727 (Reply 12):
I get slight the impression you are ever so slightly "sensitive" about UA discussions and its ops.

I'm just sensitive in general today. I'll get over it.

I just don't like the constant A v B nonsense that rules every discussion and how now that Smisek is in charge clearly UA will be going all Boeing IMMEDIATELY and etc etc etc.

But hey, clearly I just post in quantity and I do not know anything about airlines or aviation.

NS

[Edited 2011-12-06 20:11:31]

User currently offlineplanewasted From Sweden, joined Jan 2008, 538 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 12736 times:

I have the impression that Airbus is a lot more open about delays in the A350 program, than Boeing during the 787 program. Boeing must have know quite early they had problems but did not announce them. Because of that, I trust Airbus current estimates a lot more.

User currently offlinejustloveplanes From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 1065 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 12666 times:

Quoting n1786b (Reply 11):
Entry into service for the A350-900 is foreseen for 2012.

Were any orders placed with that assumption? If not, then the delivery date for the first order should be used.

Quoting frigatebird (Reply 5):
Originally, EIS of the A350-900 in its current XWB form was Q2 2013. It's now Q2 2014, so the delay is 1 year. 6 months was its most recent delay, but it had already suffered a previous 6 months delay to Q4 2013.

My gut feel is with the amount of new technology, there will be more delays. Unless A has already matured it's grip on essentially a new concept aircraft, and hence has a deterministic understanding of all the issues it has left (no unknown unknowns and bounded known unknowns), there will be more surprises. 6 months at least, perhaps a bit more. Doubt they'll get to a total of 3 years behind but around 2 years give or take a few months seems a reasonable guess.


User currently offlineqfa787380 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 12668 times:

Quoting gigneil (Reply 1):
There is a simple 6 month delay as of now.

No information is available to indicate a futher delay.

The plane enters the FAL soon.

There's no point in speculating without any facts.



Wrong again,

Bernstein, who proved to be very accurate re 787 delays are predicting another 12 month delay for the 350 and don't expect EIS until 2015. Many analysts are of the same opinion but you obviously know better.


User currently offlinezeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9229 posts, RR: 76
Reply 21, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 12622 times:

Quoting gigneil (Reply 17):

I just don't like the constant A v B nonsense that rules every discussion

I am the same, and I do not like it how every A350 related thread has been driven to be a comparison to the 777 and 787 by the same people. Makes one think if there is an orchestrated effort to muddy the A350 program.

Quoting planewasted (Reply 18):
I have the impression that Airbus is a lot more open about delays in the A350 program, than Boeing during the 787 program.

I have been at the briefing Airbus gave to a customer recently, and I would have to agree with the observation. They have told us exactly where the problems were, and how they have been identified and fixed. They have stressed that they are not going forward unless issues that have been encountered are dealt with as they arise, they will not carry forward unfinished work to the next step. This means that unfinished work is not being masked with production and delivery of unfinished sections.

This along with using the same suppliers as of previous projects, and using essentially a very similar production method as similar projects give customers a lot more confidence in the project timeline. People know how an A330 is being built today, so they have a very good idea how the A350 will be built, and the have confidence in the same suppliers.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineAngMoh From Singapore, joined Nov 2011, 504 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 12558 times:

Quoting planewasted (Reply 18):
I have the impression that Airbus is a lot more open about delays in the A350 program, than Boeing during the 787 program. Boeing must have know quite early they had problems but did not announce them. Because of that, I trust Airbus current estimates a lot more.

I also have the impression that Airbus has a lot more emphasis on 'industrialisation" (i.e. how to get them build) than Boeing. That actually drove the choice for panels over barrels. I would not be surprised with more delays till EIS, but I don't expect them to be anywhere near the 787 delays and I think the manufacturing ramp up will be much much faster.

I expect the flight test to have less issues (and therefore to be almost delay-free) thanks to the iron bird testing (a huge lesson learned from the A380).

And the Trent XWB looks very good (thanks to the lessons learned from Trent 900 and Tent 1000)....


User currently offlineAcheron From Spain, joined Sep 2005, 1720 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 12403 times:

There will certainly be delays for the A350. That much is a given.

Will they be of the same extent than the 787?. Doubt it. Boeing tried to many new things(for them) at the same time which ended up biting them in the ass, while Airbus approach is relatively more conservative and few of the A350 technologies are already flying in the A380.


User currently offlinefrigatebird From Netherlands, joined Jun 2008, 1715 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (3 years 1 week 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 12209 times:

Quoting justloveplanes (Reply 19):
Quoting n1786b (Reply 11):Entry into service for the A350-900 is foreseen for 2012.
Were any orders placed with that assumption? If not, then the delivery date for the first order should be used.

Yes, SQ was launch customer of the first A350XWB version. But that was still with an Al-Li fuselage design. After some criticism from the airlines and leasing companies (Notably ILFC's mr. Udvar-Hazy), Airbus decided to redesign it and use CFRP panels, which resulted in a planned EIS of 2013. But I don't count that as a 'delay' in the same sense as that other airplane which cannot be mentioned in this thread   

Quoting Acheron (Reply 24):
There will certainly be delays for the A350. That much is a given.

Will they be of the same extent than the 787?.

Ssshhht! Don't mention that plane   



146,318/19/20/21,AB6,332,343,345,388,722,732/3/4/5/G/8,9,742,74E,744,752,762,763,772,77E,773,77W,AT4/7,ATP,CRK,E90,F50/7
25 tommytoyz : The Op and the header asks a specific question - comparing the A350 with 787 delays. Naturally then, 787 production delays would be legitimately disc
26 zeke : No, the OP said, "similar issues that B and the 787 has seen over the past years". Read the actual OP, not just the title. Answer the actual question
27 Arniepie : Just out of curiosity but are the A350 assembly parts going to be delivered in the old style airbus way, essentially mainly by Beluga or is it going t
28 tommytoyz : I will read the title, just like everyone else, sorry old chap. Or are you suggesting I and everyone else ignore it? Quote verifiable source please,
29 tommytoyz : We'll see how rightly or wrongly your personal confidence has been placed.
30 rjm777ual : As of right now, Airbus has constructed the first A350 XWB front fuselage sector. I'm guessing early 2017 is when the first will be delivered. You als
31 ebj1248650 : Modern technology being what it is, I'd think we'd expect delays as new techniques, materials and such are introduced to airplane manufacturing. Both
32 Post contains images Cerecl : So you are predicting another ~3 years' of delay? TrentXWB was reportedly going well.
33 rjm777ual : The original time frame was 2015-2016.
34 frigatebird : For the A350-1000. That has indeed been pushed back to 2017.
35 Post contains images United727 : LOL, Neil, there have been plenty of times I've wanted to use this same sentiment for your posts with specific regard to UA. I've come to terms that
36 Post contains links Stitch : An erroneous extrapolation on my part of your comment in Reply 6 that Airbus planned to deliver six planes, all to QR, in Q4 2013 to an equally erron
37 EPA001 : No, it is not. See below: Now what link should he post here to verify that? He was there, that is what counts. That he can publicly not share proprie
38 Aeolus : Will we still see the A358? I've never known what's become of it except that Airbus is pushing everyone to either change to A359 or A350-1000s... -Aeo
39 Post contains images zeke : Road, rail, sea, river, and air. How could you quote my reply 13 if you only read the title ? I was at the Airbus briefing, this is what happens when
40 tdscanuck : Be careful with putting too much stock in iron birds vs. flight test delays...the 787 also had an iron bird. They're a great idea, no doubt, but they
41 zeke : It is still panels over a frame being assembled at a first tier supplier, shipped to the FAL in once piece, just like the A330. The composite spoiler
42 flipdewaf : Although not the entire main structure, wasn't the A380 aft section made using this method? Fred
43 ebbuk : So that I am clear the question is not will the A350 have similar delays to the B787 but will it have equally lengthy delays as the B787? Clarity fro
44 YTZ : This year. How'd they do the last couple? I'm not saying they are not profitable. All I suggested is that delays might be a blessing in disguise some
45 Stitch : They did not provide a source, but as their comments track directly to those comments from M. Caudron's comments from two years earlier, that seems t
46 747400sp : UA used to be a modern Pan Am in pre-9/11, they even had anround the world service with a 744, 763 and 772, I believe it was flight 1 LAX-HKG-BOM-LHR
47 ikramerica : If you want to discuss the A350 without mentioning the 787 program, maybe you should post in a thread that doesn't mention both IN THE TITLE. Serious
48 RoseFlyer : It is too early to know if there will be a another delay, but it is also too early to know if it will deliver on time. At this point in the build proc
49 Post contains images steffenbn : Who would really know that untill the A350 is at EIS??
50 Post contains links tommytoyz : AB is behind schedule from their published 2008 plan: http://www.flightglobal.com/assets/getasset.aspx?ItemID=23706 I couldn't agree more. Please re-r
51 Post contains images EPA001 : I also would not be not be surprised if the careful approach Airbus has selected will result in winning back some of the now projected lost (still ra
52 tommytoyz : No. That is not what I think, say, said, wrote, insinuate or want to say - or anything else along those lines. The latest is that AB announced a 6 mo
53 tommytoyz : Based on the fact that I did not see their Nov 10 delay announcement until now - my bad.
54 UALWN : Deleted. Unnecessary after reply #53.[Edited 2011-12-07 13:33:30]
55 AADC10 : Obviously the A350 has already been delayed but the 787 was Boeing's first use of extensive outsourcing and obviously had trouble with it. Airbus for
56 ikramerica : If outsourcing turns out to be the only potential place for problems, sure. But what problems did the A380 face? Design issues Production issues Wiri
57 Post contains images gigneil : In the future, try it. It frequently works NS
58 KC135TopBoom : EADS/Airbus has been very slow, like Boeing, in announcing or confirming program delays. They have done that with the A-400 program which is now 4 ye
59 qfa787380 : Agreed and like Boeing, I expect 6 months might be the magic number. Interesting that nobody has bothered to mention the many analysts that expect mo
60 Post contains links tdscanuck : Partners is not the same thing as suppliers, at least on the 787. In addition, the 787 spoilers are made by FACC as a sub-contractor Hawker De Havill
61 tommytoyz : I mostly agree with you. The thrust of what I was saying was better said like this: I find it hard to believe, that in a bit over 2 years, the A350 w
62 XT6Wagon : Don't worry, I have complete faith in Airbus striving for continued leadership in the Aviation industry. Even in delays.... So far I have seen nothing
63 Post contains images dynamicsguy : You beat me to the punch Tom Now Boeing Aerostructures Australia, BTW. FACC have been making airplane parts since the mid 80s, and the ski manufactur
64 Post contains links zeke : So you understand that an aircraft takes more than a few weeks to make, long lead time items take over a year before delivery from manufacture. Most
65 ebbuk : Beautifully put. I salute you. I am not sure if the person starting the thread was not a tad mischievous in the wording such as to cause all this rum
66 garpd : I think Airbus have the advantage of hindsight here. They've seen what cause Boeing headaches and delays and will avoid those situations as best they
67 Stitch : Many on this forum claimed Boeing would see a smooth EIS for the 787 because of the "lessons learned" from watching Airbus' fumbles on the A380...
68 Post contains images EPA001 : In the end with so many systems it will most likely be as complicated as a B787, but probably less complicated as an A380. Too bad that some Boeing f
69 garpd : Good point
70 abba : I felt that too, unfortunately I am afraid that this is very much the case... But as has been stated by others, the philosophy of Airbus is different
71 tdscanuck : What about the manufacturing technique was unproven or caused delays? The only 787 delays that related to the wing was the wing/body join problem and
72 pygmalion : While that makes a great bumper sticker slogan. And it might seem great for Airbus to do so.... that hasn't really been their practice. The biggest p
73 RoseFlyer : I'm a little confused as what you mean by engineering reports. Are you talking about certification plans and documentation, acceptance test criteria
74 abba : That is true. But that was actually - as far as I understand - a problem realised only late in the program that was basically due to different comput
75 cmf : Why? Isn't it pretty much where it should be for that timeline? A year at assembly and working out those kinks and then a year for testing. Sounds ri
76 tommytoyz : If AB can do it without any more hiccups, I applaud them. But they have already had more hiccups than planned and eaten up all the built in time line
77 ikramerica : You obviously aren't helping anyone then...
78 cmf : Why do you say that? A year for assembly and another for testing seems very reasonable for handling normal problems. They just put time back in the p
79 tommytoyz : And certification or rectifying any larger issues? That takes time and with the new build method/materials, I think certification will take its time.
80 Post contains images cmf : They have a year. Seems that has been sufficient for most programs. The only certainty about the future is that there is no certainty You can't pad t
81 Post contains links Rheinwaldner : The same people some years back commented any 787 delay rumour with grimly one-liners that without official confirmation there would be "no delay". S
82 tdscanuck : I know the 787 had well documented supplier documentation problems, as the links you provided note. I was referring specifically to the spoilers, whi
83 Post contains images Stitch : There are Airbus fans who have spent the last three and half years chortling mightily about the 787's delays so as to make the A380's EIS and product
84 frmrcapcadet : To repeat, the complexity of recent new airplanes and engines is likely at the edge of what the industry can do. And beyond what they expect to cost a
85 RoseFlyer : You are commenting on a problem known as Configuration Control. During the early stages of building a new airplane there are always problems with con
86 tommytoyz : Reminds me a Henry Ford's quote as he commented on the first automobile production line - Customers can have any color they want, so long as it's bla
87 Stitch : To be fair, such restrictions are not unique to Airbus and the A350.
88 MoltenRock : Do we really need to revisit the 500 threads "chortling" about if the 787 would fly / EIS before the A380? The difference is, it is highly doubtful A
89 RoseFlyer : No they are not at all. I think I remember the quote that on the 777, you can choose from 17 different coffee makers. Boeing cut that down to 3 on th
90 BoeEngr : Sure would be fantastic to see the men and women of Airbus (and the suppliers) complete the project without further delays. I wish them the best, and
91 FLALEFTY : I'm too tired to read all of the responses (although gigneil's trolling is always amusing) but the A350 will probably face the same manufacturing issu
92 zeke : And who subcontracts to FACC ? Yes they were. The barrels, specifically the rear barrel section. Same supplier had other issues from memory down the
93 cmf : The boat industry's use of composites goes back some 70 years as well. They have developed accurate modeling that should be applicable to aviation to
94 Stitch : Yes they were. And I agree that it should prevent the massive fumble Boeing had with the 787, which took 7.5 years to deliver to NH. But that more co
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