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Interesting Upper Deck Evacuation Slides - 747-8I  
User currently offlineYYCFlyer From Canada, joined Jan 2012, 31 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 16997 times:
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I found this picture of the new upper deck evacuation slide for the 747-8I.

Very Cool!

http://www.pirepics.com/albums/userp...747-8I_s_New_Escape_Slides_res.jpg


'Opinions Expressed By This Poster Do Not Reflect Those Of My Employer'
27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineas739x From United States of America, joined Apr 2003, 6196 posts, RR: 24
Reply 1, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 16962 times:

That is interesting. Almost like a canopy over the top ones.


"Some pilots avoid storm cells and some play connect the dots!"
User currently offlinetdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 2, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 16947 times:

Quoting as739x (Reply 1):
Almost like a canopy over the top ones.

I don't think there's anything between the arches (i.e. no actual weather coverage), just the two arches stabilizing the side tubes.

Tom.


User currently offlineas739x From United States of America, joined Apr 2003, 6196 posts, RR: 24
Reply 3, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 16893 times:

Quoting tdscanuck (Reply 2):

That make's sense. Hard to tell from the forward angle of the shot.



"Some pilots avoid storm cells and some play connect the dots!"
User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10340 posts, RR: 26
Reply 4, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 16773 times:

Interesting - looks like a tied-arch bridge.

(probably acts like one too)



How can I be an admiral without my cap??!
User currently offlineFlyboyOz From Australia, joined Nov 2000, 1992 posts, RR: 25
Reply 5, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 16395 times:

Wow...I have never thought of that new design of the new upper deck evacuation slide. It is useful because it helps to stop the wind blowing out and make a strong structure.

[Edited 2012-01-02 22:04:23]


The Spirit of AustraliAN - Longreach
User currently offlineNZ2 From New Zealand, joined Aug 2007, 225 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 16316 times:

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 4):
Interesting - looks like a tied-arch bridge.

(probably acts like one too)

Totally, thats the reason for the arch to give structural strength like a bridge would


User currently offlinegatechae From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 92 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 16242 times:

Id love to see them inflate


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User currently offlineburj From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 901 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 16239 times:

Excellent design change.... Having slides so far up makes them more susceptible to wind. Curious that the A380 upper deck slides don't have/need these arches...

User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 20351 posts, RR: 59
Reply 9, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 16099 times:

But why isn't this present on the 744? The 744's upper deck is just as high above the ground as the 748i's. Why does the 748i need to have a stiffer slide? Surely, the length of the upper deck isn't the issue.

User currently offlineusxguy From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1041 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 16073 times:

... or this could be a design enhancement based on feedback from Boeing 747 users about possible issues with the UD slides.....


xx
User currently offlinerikkus67 From Canada, joined Jun 2000, 1684 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 16049 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 9):
But why isn't this present on the 744?

It's an evolutionary design. I imagine there might be a design change in the way these larger styles are stored. If not, they may be available as upgrades for the 744 fleet.



AC.WA.CP.DL.RW.CO.WG.WJ.WN.KI.FL.SK.ACL.UA.US.F9
User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 20351 posts, RR: 59
Reply 12, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 16040 times:

Quoting rikkus67 (Reply 11):
It's an evolutionary design.

That's a lot of weight for all that fabric. Evolutionary design to solve what problem? What was wrong with the 743/4 slides?


User currently offlineqf002 From Australia, joined Jul 2011, 3020 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 15186 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 12):
Quoting rikkus67 (Reply 11):
It's an evolutionary design.

That's a lot of weight for all that fabric. Evolutionary design to solve what problem? What was wrong with the 743/4 slides?

There could be a number of problems unique to the 748i:

1. The engines are much bigger and much more powerful -- there may be a need to overcome the additional wind/force if the engines are still running when the slides are deployed.

2. The number of pax evacuating from the upper deck has increased significantly -- perhaps the old slides were not designed to handle higher capacity?

In any case, the new slides might actually save weight. The lower section doesn't need to be as heavy/strong with the arches, and their weight may be lower than the weight of the reinforcement needed to the single slide.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 20351 posts, RR: 59
Reply 14, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 15142 times:

Quoting qf002 (Reply 13):

1. The engines are much bigger and much more powerful -- there may be a need to overcome the additional wind/force if the engines are still running when the slides are deployed.

Under what circumstances would an evacuation be performed on the side of the aircraft with the engines still running? I can't imagine any procedure would allow that. Evacuate only to be sucked through a fan?

Quoting qf002 (Reply 13):
2. The number of pax evacuating from the upper deck has increased significantly -- perhaps the old slides were not designed to handle higher capacity?

The upper deck needs to be clear in 90 seconds. The old upper deck could probably be clear in much less than that. Remember, it is not the overall number of passengers that determines the slide's structure. Rather, it is the number of passengers on the slide at any given moment that determines the strength needed. I don't see how the extension of the upper deck would change the number of passengers down the slide per second.


User currently offlineseabosdca From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 5841 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 14288 times:

Quoting qf002 (Reply 13):
In any case, the new slides might actually save weight. The lower section doesn't need to be as heavy/strong with the arches, and their weight may be lower than the weight of the reinforcement needed to the single slide.

This seems likely to me. Look how much thinner the slide sides are than those on the (shorter but wider) lower-deck slides.

I'd still love to know how much one of these upper-deck slides weighs.


User currently offlineTravellerPlus From New Zealand, joined Nov 2008, 347 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 13551 times:

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 14):
Under what circumstances would an evacuation be performed on the side of the aircraft with the engines still running? I can't imagine any procedure would allow that. Evacuate only to be sucked through a fan?

Accidents don't always follow procedure and engines can remain running after a severe impact. The most sombre example was the Tenerife accident. The KLM 747 hit the Pan Am 747 on the starboard side. The port side was the only useable side, even though the engines could not be shut off as the control cables were severed. The engines eventually oversped and exploded. Tragically the stewardess at the overwing exit was decapitated by shrapnel from an engine as she evacuated passengers.

Video of the Garuda 737 crash in Yogyakarta shows that an engine or APU remained running until fire consumed the aircraft.



What goes around comes around....unless your luggage is not on the carousel...
User currently offlineJAAlbert From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1624 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 10351 times:

I bet that's quite a ride on that upper evacuation slide! You must build up quite a bit of speed by the time you hit the ground - is there anything that slows a passenger down at the bottom or does everyone on the upper deck crawl away from the slide with broken ankles?

Quoting TravellerPlus (Reply 16):
Accidents don't always follow procedure and engines can remain running after a severe impact.

The Qantas 380 involved in the engine incident in Singapore couldn't shut down one or two of its engines one one side after landing.


User currently offlineburj From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 901 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 10211 times:

Quoting JAAlbert (Reply 17):
I bet that's quite a ride on that upper evacuation slide! You must build up quite a bit of speed by the time you hit the ground - is there anything that slows a passenger down at the bottom or does everyone on the upper deck crawl away from the slide with broken ankles?

The actual slide surface that you slide down is not that slick so with the friction against your clothes you hit a "terminal velocity" pretty quickly. This means you don't just keep accelerating all the way down the slide... Not to say it isn't risky to go down those slides, especially if you don't keep your legs in front of you ready to absorb some of the energy when you transition off the slide, but most people will not be breaking their ankles.


User currently onlineedina From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 747 posts, RR: 9
Reply 19, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 9979 times:

Quoting burj (Reply 18):
Quoting JAAlbert (Reply 17):I bet that's quite a ride on that upper evacuation slide! You must build up quite a bit of speed by the time you hit the ground - is there anything that slows a passenger down at the bottom or does everyone on the upper deck crawl away from the slide with broken ankles?
The actual slide surface that you slide down is not that slick so with the friction against your clothes you hit a "terminal velocity" pretty quickly. This means you don't just keep accelerating all the way down the slide... Not to say it isn't risky to go down those slides, especially if you don't keep your legs in front of you ready to absorb some of the energy when you transition off the slide, but most people will not be breaking their ankles.

On most evacuation slides you also have very high friction strips (on the average widebody the last 1-1.5 metres) that slow a sliding person right down.....your butt hits these strips & it's like a push up on to your feet enabling a quick getaway from the bottom of the slide.

http://www.securiteaerienne.com/ill/...itish-Airways-288-Evacuation-4.jpg

You can see the square patch at the bottom of the slide on the above BA 744.

[Edited 2012-01-04 05:17:03]


Worked on - Caravelle Mercure A300 A320 F27 SD3-60 BAe146 747-100/200/400 DC10-30 767 777 737-400 757 A319 A321
User currently offlineburj From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 901 posts, RR: 4
Reply 20, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 9344 times:

Quoting edina (Reply 19):
You can see the square patch at the bottom of the slide on the above BA 744.

Oh cool...hadn't seen pictures of these before!


User currently onlineVC10er From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 2986 posts, RR: 13
Reply 21, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 9286 times:
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Let's pray they never get used - but i can promise you I will be on that upper deck one day and I like it.

Is this really the first time this type of design has ever been seen? Not on a big military bird either?



The world is missing love, let's use our flights to spread it!
User currently offlineGSPflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 369 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 9157 times:

How can I order one for a third floor dorm room? That would save so much time not having to go down 2 flights of stairs or wait for an elevator.

The arches definitely are there to add stability, much like arched bridges. I'm surprised they wouldn't put some kind of netting down the length of the slide to prevent people from falling off the sides.

[Edited 2012-01-04 20:48:40]

User currently offlinequiet1 From Thailand, joined Apr 2010, 358 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 9073 times:

Quoting edina (Reply 19):
On most evacuation slides you also have very high friction strips (on the average widebody the last 1-1.5 metres) that slow a sliding person right down.....your butt hits these strips & it's like a push up on to your feet enabling a quick getaway from the bottom of the slide.

And, a very good reason for women wearing skirts/dresses to wear suitable underwear. Exposed butt flesh can get damaged by those "very high friction strips."

I know of one particular evacuation where a F/A found out the hard way.


User currently offlineflightsimer From United States of America, joined Aug 2009, 606 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (2 years 11 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 8992 times:

Cool design.

Are the slides "officially" used as life rafts when evacuating in the water? When i think back to 1527, they were used but was that by choice(didnt have any true rafts) or design (in the sense of specifically being a raft in a water crash)? Could t be the arches give a increase in support/capacity when used as a raft?



Commercial Pilot- SEL, MEL, Instrument
25 quiet1 : Depends on the airplane. If the airplane is "overwater" approved and has "slide rafts" (as opposed to mere "evacuation slides,") yes, the slides are "
26 flightsimer : Thanks for the info. But do we know for sure this is indeed not a new "slide-Raft"? is there a way to tell them apart?
27 quiet1 : Based on that picture of the -8i, I doubt the upper deck slides are slide rafts (I know for a fact that the -400's are not). Look at the relatively na
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