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In Memory Of TK981 Crash At Ermenonville - 38 Years Later  
User currently offlineleftyboarder From Turkey, joined Apr 2008, 693 posts, RR: 1
Posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 8057 times:

I thought that I might take the time to remember a sad moment in aviation history.

On March 3rd, 1974, TK 981, a DC-10-10 from IST to LHR via ORY, crashed shortly after take-off from ORY. 346 people of many nationalities perished with no survivors in the deadliest aviation accident to that date, due to what was later discovered to be the failure of cargo hatch latching.

The accident led to several design modifications to DC-10's cargo hatch door, and contributed to the negative public opinion of the type.

The accident stayed the deadliest single aircraft crash until 1985, and is still the deadliest TK accident.

May their souls rest in peace.

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlineTK787 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 4374 posts, RR: 12
Reply 1, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 7947 times:

I was a young boy but I totally remember the day. RIP.

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User currently offline727LOVER From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 6380 posts, RR: 17
Reply 2, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 7796 times:

Wbat was the difference between this & the AA DC-10 over Michigan?


Listen Betty, don't start up with your 'White Zone' s*** again.
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12331 posts, RR: 25
Reply 3, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 7765 times:

It was a huge tragedy, given that the accident was totally preventable.

Quote:

TC-JAV had been ordered three months after the service bulletin was issued, and been delivered to Turkish Airlines three months after that. Despite this, the changes required by the service bulletin (installation of a support plate for the handle linkage, preventing the bending of the linkage seen in the Flight 96 incident) had not been implemented. The interconnecting linkage between the lock and the latch hooks had not been upgraded. Through either deliberate fraud or oversight, the construction logs nevertheless showed that this work had been carried out.

Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TK_981



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlinelhr380 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 7743 times:

Was it not full of BA customers due to a strike or a tech plane? Was it this flight.

User currently offlineB747forever From Sweden, joined May 2007, 17051 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 7715 times:

Quoting lhr380 (Reply 4):

Yes, it was this flight according to wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TK_981



Work Hard, Fly Right
User currently offlinePilot21 From Ireland, joined Oct 1999, 1384 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 7663 times:

Quoting 727LOVER (Reply 2):
Wbat was the difference between this & the AA DC-10 over Michigan?



Both cases are almost identical, the only difference in the AA incident was the fact that when the cargo door blew, the cabin floor only partially collapsed, and thus the pilots were still left with some hydraulic cables intact and had some control over the aircraft. In the Turkish accident, the floor completed disintegrated above the cargo door and eject 6 passengers as well, resulting in the complete severance of all the hydraulic cables to the tail. I believe one of the factors that helped in the AA incident were the height at which the cargo door blew (it was around 11K in the AA incident, a little higher in the Turkish accident) and the fact that no passengers were seated above the collapsed floor in the AA aircraft, meaning there was less weight pushing on the floor and seats. All small factors in their own right, but in combination, it unfortunately proved deadly.

Quoting lhr380 (Reply 4):
Was it not full of BA customers due to a strike or a tech plane? Was it this flight.

Yes, there was a BEA ground staff strike on that day, so a lot of people who had been due to take BEA planes back from Paris were rebooked onto the Turkish flight for the short flight from Paris to London.

Pilot21



Aircraft I've flown: A300/A310/A320/A321/A330/A340/B727/B732/B733/B734/B735/B738/B741/B742/B744/DC10/MD80/IL62/Bae146/AR
User currently offlinekaitak From Ireland, joined Aug 1999, 12407 posts, RR: 37
Reply 7, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 7660 times:

Quoting lhr380 (Reply 4):
Was it not full of BA customers due to a strike or a tech plane? Was it this flight.

It was much fuller due to a strike; BA baggage handlers were on strike that day and there had been a rugby international the previous day (I presume, England -v- France); one can only imagine how the baggage handlers felt when they heard the news and realised that so many BA passengers had booked on that flight.

It was also the day of the official opening of the new Paris Airport at Roissy, north of Paris - which we now know as CDG.

There was a superb book about the DC10, published many years ago, which had some very interesting info about this flight and how the news was broken. I think it was called "The Rise and Fall of the DC10" by John Godson.


User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12331 posts, RR: 25
Reply 8, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 7578 times:

Quoting kaitak (Reply 7):
There was a superb book about the DC10, published many years ago, which had some very interesting info about this flight and how the news was broken. I think it was called "The Rise and Fall of the DC10" by John Godson.

Thanks for the pointer.

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/john-godson-2/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-dc-10 has a review of the book.

I'll have to see if I can get a loaner from a public library.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineleftyboarder From Turkey, joined Apr 2008, 693 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 7525 times:

A small note... The plane that was involved, TC-JAV, was christened Ankara. The name was later used on TC-JDL, an A340-300, and most recently TC-JJP, the latest 777-300ER in the fleet.

User currently onlineBoeingGuy From United States of America, joined Dec 2010, 2969 posts, RR: 7
Reply 10, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 7328 times:

Quoting 727LOVER (Reply 2):
Wbat was the difference between this & the AA DC-10 over Michigan?
Quoting Pilot21 (Reply 6):
Quoting 727LOVER (Reply 2):
Wbat was the difference between this & the AA DC-10 over Michigan?



Both cases are almost identical, the only difference in the AA incident was the fact that when the cargo door blew, the cabin floor only partially collapsed, and thus the pilots were still left with some hydraulic cables intact and had some control over the aircraft. In the Turkish accident, the floor completed disintegrated above the cargo door and eject 6 passengers as well, resulting in the complete severance of all the hydraulic cables to the tail. I believe one of the factors that helped in the AA incident were the height at which the cargo door blew (it was around 11K in the AA incident, a little higher in the Turkish accident) and the fact that no passengers were seated above the collapsed floor in the AA aircraft, meaning there was less weight pushing on the floor and seats. All small factors in their own right, but in combination, it unfortunately proved deadly.

There was another very significant difference also. The AA captain had previously been playing around in the simulator with controlling the DC-10 only with the throttles. It's is somewhat unique in having the higher tail mounted engine so it gives you much more pitch control with thrust than most other airplanes.

When the cargo door blew, he apparently immediately increased thrust on the two wing engines which kept the nose up. Once TK went nose down it was pretty much over for them.

The captain was able to maintain control mostly using the throttles and get the airplane down. I read that on landing rollout, the airplane left the side of the runway and was heading straight across the grass toward the terminal. First time the captain doubted his ability to save the airplane. The first office reached over and pushed an outboard throttle forward and the airplane turned back away from the terminal.

This clearly ranks up there with the EA Constallation after the mid-air with the TWA 707, and the FX A300, as one of the most impressive peaces of flying ever done to save an airplane


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24796 posts, RR: 22
Reply 11, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 7088 times:

Quoting leftyboarder (Reply 9):
A small note... The plane that was involved, TC-JAV, was christened Ankara. The name was later used on TC-JDL, an A340-300, and most recently TC-JJP, the latest 777-300ER in the fleet.

One of the other two TK DC-10-10s in service at the time of the Paris crash is still flying today for FedEx, just over 39 years since it was delivered to TK in February 1973. Then TC-JAY, now N68059.


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The other was also operated by FedEx but is now retired and stored at VCV (N68058, ex TC-JAU).


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Photo © Wolfgang Mendorf
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Photo © Sandro Mederle - JetlinerImages



The 3 TK aircraft were the only DC-10-10s delivered to a non-US customer, apart from 6 for Laker Airways. If memory correct, the TK aircraft had originally been ordered by another carrier (forget who) but they were cancelled before delivery and sold to TK.


User currently offlinekiwiandrew From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 8538 posts, RR: 13
Reply 12, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 6789 times:
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Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 11):
If memory correct, the TK aircraft had originally been ordered by another carrier (forget who) but they were cancelled before delivery and sold to TK.

I believe that they had been built in anticipation of an order from NH which never materialised as they ordered L-1011s instead.



Moderation in all things ... including moderation ;-)
User currently offlinefaro From Egypt, joined Aug 2007, 1533 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (2 years 4 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 4354 times:

Sadly, I think that no other accident involved such high impact speed as TK981, barring perhaps those caused by spiral dives. It must have been horrifying in the cockpit watching the ground come up so fast. RIP.

Faro



The chalice not my son
User currently offlineWA707atMSP From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 2208 posts, RR: 8
Reply 14, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 3282 times:

Another excellent book about the crash is "Destination Disaster", by Paul Eddy and Elaine Potter. This book discusses the crash, and the AA 96 incident that preceded it, at great length. The captain of AA 96, Bryce McCormick, did every bit as superb a job bringing his DC-10 back to DTW as "Sully" did landing the A320 in the Hudson.

The book is long out of print, but there are several copies available on Alibris. It's an excellent book!



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