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The Most Senior FAs At Different Airlines?  
User currently offlineJackbr From Australia, joined Dec 2009, 668 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 3603 times:

After seeing the recent thread on Ron Akana at United, it got me thinking...

UA - Ron Akana, 83, mostly flies DEN-HNL
PMCO - Norma Heape, ?, mostly flies international from EWR
PMNW - Bob Reardon, 87, MSP-NRT preferred trips

What about AA and PMDL? Does anybody know who the number 1 FAs are at these airlines, and where the mostly fly?

Who are the most senior FAs at other airlines inside and outside the US?

Obviously names aren't neccessary, I'm more interested in where they fly and how long they've flown - and what they're like to fly with!

[Edited 2012-03-19 22:15:14]

19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJQflightie From Australia, joined Mar 2009, 1010 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 3602 times:

Quoting Jackbr (Thread starter):

QF 'number one' started in 1967 and is still here!



Next Trip: PER-DPS-KUL-BKK-HKT-CNX-BKK-SIN-PER
User currently offlineJackbr From Australia, joined Dec 2009, 668 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 3564 times:

Quoting JQflightie (Reply 1):
QF 'number one' started in 1967 and is still here!

Long Haul I assume - or ex TAA?


User currently offlineSMFAviatrix From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 18 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 3538 times:

Aloha's #1 FA was awesome. My supervisor saw her name coming in and got freaked out and said he heard she was a pain. But she was the sweetest happiest FA, said hello to everyone and was wrapped in a blanket because she was colds, she mostly did inter-island hops but liked to come to the mainland every so often. She was great and totally not what we expected. Not that this was super helpful in the topic but I just wanted to share my little story of the #1 FA I got to meet while working.

User currently offlinepqdtw From Netherlands, joined Aug 2008, 154 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3472 times:

Quoting Jackbr (Thread starter):
What about AA and PMDL? Does anybody know who the number 1 FAs are at these airlines, and where the mostly fly?

As of May 1, PMDL and PMNW separation will be a thing of the past. We already have a joint seniority list that has 20,000 + names on it. Of the top 10 on the seniority list, 7 are PMNW and 3 are PMDL. The highest seniority PMDL comes in at number 5. Of the top 5 at DL now, it breaks down as follows:

1 based in MSP
2 based in SEA
1 based in SFO
1 based in ATL


User currently offlineSwafa From United States of America, joined Mar 2012, 24 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3472 times:

I don't know the name of the number one stew at SWA, but we still have several "originals" working on line after nearly 41 years. I imagine most or all based in DAL.

User currently offlinebastew From Australia, joined Sep 2006, 1030 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 3251 times:

At BA i'm not sure who our '#1' is. The mandatory 55 year old retirement age was only dropped a few years ago so I would guess the most senior BA F/A has prob done about 35-ish years.

Seniority at BA gives absolutely zero influence over routes/rosters. We work to a 'fair share' system for all F/A's whether you are #1 or #14,002.


User currently offlineDALCE From Netherlands, joined Feb 2007, 1721 posts, RR: 7
Reply 7, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 3223 times:

sorry for my ignorance but how on earth can a senior of 87 act as a F/A on an aircraft.
This should be forbidden by law, since somebody of that age can't guarranty safety on board an aircraft in case of emergency. Unbelievable that this is possible in this 'modern' world!



flown: F50,F70,CR1,CR2,CR9,E75,143,AR8,AR1,733,735,736,73G,738,753,744,77W,319,320,321,333,AB6.
User currently offlinebastew From Australia, joined Sep 2006, 1030 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 3162 times:

Gotta side with you on that one DALCE. And I am an F/A myself.

User currently offlineGT4EZY From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2007, 1804 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 3120 times:

I agree too..........unfortunately.


Proud to fly from Manchester!
User currently offlinedelta2ual From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 626 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days ago) and read 2857 times:

Quoting pqdtw (Reply 4):
As of May 1, PMDL and PMNW separation will be a thing of the past. We already have a joint seniority list that has 20,000 + names on it. Of the top 10 on the seniority list, 7 are PMNW and 3 are PMDL. The highest seniority PMDL comes in at number 5. Of the top 5 at DL now, it breaks down as follows:

1 based in MSP
2 based in SEA
1 based in SFO
1 based in ATL

Interesting side note, 2 of the top 10 PMDL were former Northeast Airlines; I flew with both of them out of BOS and then NYC. Great gals with great Boston accents!



From the world's largest airline-to the world's largest airline. Delta2ual
User currently offlinelonghauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 5157 posts, RR: 43
Reply 11, posted (2 years 9 months 5 days ago) and read 2836 times:

Quoting DALCE (Reply 7):
sorry for my ignorance but how on earth can a senior of 87 act as a F/A on an aircraft.
This should be forbidden by law, since somebody of that age can't guarranty safety on board an aircraft in case of emergency. Unbelievable that this is possible in this 'modern' world!

I don't know about American carriers, but Air Canada requires a level of competency of its Flight Attendants regardless of age. It is tested yearly over two days, and if that level is not met, dismissal is a possibility.

Among other things, they have to be a certain "strength", as they have to remove slides, open and lift exit windows, restrain passengers. Also, they have many memorized drills and procedures.

After all of this they combine with us (the pilots) in the cabin simulator and go through some random emergencies, whereby everyone is assigned a "role" to play.

In my opinion, if an 87 year old can get through that recurrent training, they deserve to work.



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlinepqdtw From Netherlands, joined Aug 2008, 154 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (2 years 9 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 2740 times:

Quoting longhauler (Reply 11):
I don't know about American carriers, but Air Canada requires a level of competency of its Flight Attendants regardless of age. It is tested yearly over two days, and if that level is not met, dismissal is a possibility.

Among other things, they have to be a certain "strength", as they have to remove slides, open and lift exit windows, restrain passengers. Also, they have many memorized drills and procedures.

After all of this they combine with us (the pilots) in the cabin simulator and go through some random emergencies, whereby everyone is assigned a "role" to play.

In my opinion, if an 87 year old can get through that recurrent training, they deserve to work.

That's true of US-based carriers as well. Each year a flight attendant goes through recurrent training, which is relatively physically (and mentally) demanding. You are put on the spot to open heavy doors, and lift heavy emergency window exits. In the case of the rear-mounted engine aircraft, you have to walk into a dark tunnel crouching. You have to get in an out of a life raft in an evacuation scenario; evacuate smoke-filled cabins; extinguish fires with heavy and unwieldy extinguishers; don PBE's; demonstrate proficiency with CPR on a mannequin.... Have I forgotten anything? We normally refer to it as "training", but it is anything but that. It is two days of demonstrating proficiency and competency on emergency equipment and emergency evacuation procedures.

It's a stressful two days. For anyone who is 80 + and passing these proficiency drills, I am always impressed. I know I won't be able to do it when I reach that age.


User currently offlineSwafa From United States of America, joined Mar 2012, 24 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (2 years 9 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 2740 times:

Quoting DALCE (Reply 7):

I'll let you know in 47 years.


User currently offlineDALCE From Netherlands, joined Feb 2007, 1721 posts, RR: 7
Reply 14, posted (2 years 9 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2411 times:

Besides the fact that it is unsafe from my point of view to have an 87-year old operate as F/A, no matter what training, a perosn of this age should not have to work anymore but enjoy the fall of life instead of working.
I still find it unbelievable!

Quoting longhauler (Reply 11):
In my opinion, if an 87 year old can get through that recurrent training, they deserve to work.

They deserve to enjoy retirement at this age. Come on, they are elderly people!



flown: F50,F70,CR1,CR2,CR9,E75,143,AR8,AR1,733,735,736,73G,738,753,744,77W,319,320,321,333,AB6.
User currently offlinesmi0006 From Australia, joined Jan 2008, 1554 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 9 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2392 times:

Quoting JQflightie (Reply 1):
QF 'number one' started in 1967 and is still here!

Are they a CSM or CSS? Long-Haul I presume? What trips do they fly?

Quoting DALCE (Reply 14):
Besides the fact that it is unsafe from my point of view to have an 87-year old operate as F/A, no matter what training, a person of this age should not have to work anymore but enjoy the fall of life instead of working.

How one enjoy's life is very subjective. Some would argue traveling and socialising with passengers and crew is enjoyable, it would also give them purpose. More to the point it is not for me to judge.

Quoting DALCE (Reply 14):
They deserve to enjoy retirement at this age. Come on, they are elderly people!

They can retire if they want to, it's their choice. I find it shameful that because some one is elderly we should remove their choice on how they should steer their lives. So long as they are physically able to complete their recurrent Emergency procedures training they should be allowed to keep their jobs.

I have seen many young overweight crew barely able to move around with their co-workers in the galley (being a former Dash-8 crew I have also experienced this myself - with a larger co-worker) who I would have greater concern about their ability to preform in an evacuation.

Thus should emergency procedures training be made more physically demanding is another issue...

I am curious though are all American Cabin Crew required to remember the emergency equipment locations on all aircraft? They seem to operate such a large and diverse fleet, how do they manage this?

At QF we had to remember all equipment locations by heart, one of the reasons the fleets are broken up between long and short-haul.


User currently offlineCO777DAL From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 627 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (2 years 9 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2382 times:

I have the number 4 most senior flight attendant at Continental Airlines on tape. Her name is Penny Schuchat and she been flying with them for 48 years . She is super nice, shows off her badges for service she wears around her neck. She looks very good for her age.
http://youtu.be/ixG81D4h_J4?hd=1

Norma Heape CO number 1 has been with the airline 55 year and will be 75 this year. What more interesting is she has Perfect Attendance!!! She usually in BusinessFirst on EWR-HKG.



Worked Hard. Flew Right. Farewell, Continental. Thanks for the memories.
User currently offlinecrj200faguy From United States of America, joined May 2007, 400 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (2 years 9 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2237 times:

I'd be curious to know the top fas at regionals and ask them why they never went mainline

User currently offlineRyanairGuru From Australia, joined Oct 2006, 5939 posts, RR: 5
Reply 18, posted (2 years 9 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2210 times:

Quoting smi0006 (Reply 15):
I am curious though are all American Cabin Crew required to remember the emergency equipment locations on all aircraft? They seem to operate such a large and diverse fleet, how do they manage this?

I've wondered that as well. Most countries restrict qualification to three aircraft types, whereas in the USA it seems normal to be qualified on every type in the fleet.



Worked Hard, Flew Right
User currently offlinefloridaflyboy From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 2018 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (2 years 9 months 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2098 times:

Quoting crj200faguy (Reply 17):
I'd be curious to know the top fas at regionals and ask them why they never went mainline

At XJ, our most senior FA when I was there had been there 26 years (1983 hire). Many FAs decide not to go mainline and contrary to popular belief it has nothing to do with them 'not being able to cut it at mainline.' For many, it is quality of life. At a regional, it is generally easier to be based in the city you wish. For example, living in MSP, it was easy to get MSP base out the gate at XJ. However, at NW, you would often have to be based in DTW or another base for a period. It also generally carries a shorter reserve period and a shorter period to begin getting desirable lines. Some also prefer working by themselves or with only one other flight attendant. Some prefer flying shorter hops and (often) smaller cities. For me personally, I loved being a regional FA. Within 4 months of hire, I was able to hold 5 2-day Saab trips a month with the overnights I wanted, days off I wanted, the hours I desired, etc. I lived 10 minutes from my base airport. It was a great quality of life for me, if you can get by on the first few years of regional FA pay.



Good goes around!
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