Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Ryanair Emergency Descent, Wednesday  
User currently offlinereadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3187 posts, RR: 2
Posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 7095 times:

Just reported here.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-17631534

Alarmed a few passengers and frightened the children no doubt but all is well.

Quote "You overheard the captain saying 'Mayday, mayday,' and he was saying it rapidly as we were going down. I thought my number was up."

A bit of drama for the interview?


you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
39 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineScottishDavie From UK - Scotland, joined Feb 2011, 181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 6644 times:

Complete non-story. Pressurisation problem occurs, crew do their jobs, everybody is safe, story ends apart from sensationalised media garbage. (Are they suggesting that flights out of Bergamot are particularly prone to pressurisation issues??) I'm no fan of FR but they did as well as any other carrier under the circumstances.

User currently offlinesandyb123 From UK - Scotland, joined Oct 2007, 1073 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 6345 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting readytotaxi (Thread starter):
Quote "You overheard the captain saying 'Mayday, mayday,' and he was saying it rapidly as we were going down. I thought my number was up."

Absolutely! Isn't 'Pan Pan Pan' would be more suitable?

I love the fact the witness is Mr Farter. Maybe the pressurisation probles started at his rear end. LOL  

Sandyb123



DC3, 727, 737, 744, 753, 777, A32X, A345, A388, ERJ145, E190, BaE146, D328, ATR72, Q400
User currently offlineSpeedbirdie From United Kingdom, joined May 2006, 915 posts, RR: 52
Reply 3, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 6302 times:

Why so much hype about this particular story? Every news website I come across I see this story..


Never give up..
User currently offlinerichardw From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 3746 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 6280 times:

Is on the front page of a UK tabloid today http://m.mirror.co.uk/ms/p/tmg/mirro...=3653831&&cat=Mirror-News&a=783679

User currently offlineSandroZRH From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 3428 posts, RR: 50
Reply 5, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 6273 times:

Quoting sandyb123 (Reply 2):
Absolutely! Isn't 'Pan Pan Pan' would be more suitable?

No, an emergency descent is a definite mayday.

But yes, a complete non-event indeed..


User currently offlinebtblue From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2004, 578 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 6217 times:

Quoting readytotaxi (Thread starter):
A bit of drama for the interview?

if you want drama read this:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ure--passengers-reveal-terror.html

The captain "screamed Mayday! Mayday!"



146/2/3 737/2/3/4/5/7/8/9 A320 1/2/18/19/21 DC9/40/50 DC10/30 A300/6 A330/2/3 A340/3/6 A380 757/2/3 747/4 767/3/4 787 77
User currently offlinereadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3187 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 6114 times:

Quoting Speedbirdie (Reply 3):
Quoting btblue (Reply 6):

I guess it must have been a VERY slow news day.



you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
User currently offlineQuokkas From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 6054 times:

Of course it was a slow news day: to our regular A.netters these things are par for the course. Hardly do they ever take a trip without sudden loss of cabin pressure and oxygen masks being deployed while simultaneously doing a go around and a water landing. But to Mr and Mrs Average Flyer this would indeed be alarming.

The real news is that FR didn't charge for the oxygen, or will a direct debit be made to the passengers' credit cards?   

Quoting sandyb123 (Reply 2):
I love the fact the witness is Mr Farter.

All the links state that his name is Frater but your version would be more amusing.  


User currently offlinebabybus From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 6044 times:

This type of event isn't rare from what I see. The only difference being some happen on a slow news day.

A friend of mine was on an FR 737 from Rome a few years ago when the same thing happened to him. He said the whole experience was horrific and put him off flying for some time.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7693 posts, RR: 21
Reply 10, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 5995 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting babybus (Reply 9):
This type of event isn't rare from what I see.

Come off it folks, seriously. Yes, it has been well hyped up in the media, but let's not pretend that this is particularly common. It clearly happens now and then, but emergency descents are hardly routine.

Quoting Quokkas (Reply 8):
The real news is that FR didn't charge for the oxygen,

No, the real news is that it was clearly handled well and nobody got seriously hurt. Still, got to get the cheap and predictable digs in somewhere I guess.

Also, how likely is it that anyone actually heard the flightdeck saying anything? I don't recall hearing any words through that door, ever, even when repeatedly sat in the first row. No doubt he would have been slightly more animated than normal, but I still seriously doubt that anyone could have heard what was actually being communicated.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineDaysleeper From UK - England, joined Dec 2009, 838 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 5910 times:

Quoting ScottishDavie (Reply 1):
Complete non-story. Pressurisation problem occurs, crew do their jobs, everybody is safe, story ends apart from sensationalised media garbage
Quoting Speedbirdie (Reply 3):
Quoting babybus (Reply 9):
This type of event isn't rare from what I see. The only difference being some happen on a slow news day.

Just out of curiosity how many emergency descents have you guys experienced?

As the poster above stated this is hardly an everyday occurrence and I have absolutely no doubt it would be terrifying for the passengers, especially if you can also hear the captain declaring a mayday. In fact, despite being a regular flyer and understanding that we were in an emergency decent i think I’d have been just as scared as everyone else.


User currently onlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21526 posts, RR: 55
Reply 12, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 5514 times:

Quoting sandyb123 (Reply 2):
Absolutely! Isn't 'Pan Pan Pan' would be more suitable?

It's called an emergency descent for a reason.

Quoting Quokkas (Reply 8):
The real news is that FR didn't charge for the oxygen, or will a direct debit be made to the passengers' credit cards?

There will be an "oxygen mask restowage fee" and an "airborne roller coaster experience" fee charged, I'm sure.

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 10):
Also, how likely is it that anyone actually heard the flightdeck saying anything? I don't recall hearing any words through that door, ever, even when repeatedly sat in the first row. No doubt he would have been slightly more animated than normal, but I still seriously doubt that anyone could have heard what was actually being communicated.

Sometimes the pilots mean to say something to ATC, and they say it to the cabin. Rather unfortunate that it happened during an emergency, but it's certainly not unheard of.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineScottishDavie From UK - Scotland, joined Feb 2011, 181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4847 times:

Quoting Daysleeper (Reply 11):
Just out of curiosity how many emergency descents have you guys experienced?

In my case one, on a BAC 1-11 many years ago and, yes, it scared me absolutely sh*tless at the time. I could never bring myself to fly on a 1-11 again and I became seriously twitchy about flying generally. I got over it eventually but it required a lot of determination on my own part and a great deal of patient support from my wife before I regained my confidence which probably took the best part of ten years.

Autobiographical details apart, I don't feel any need to justify my original post but in case there is any doubt about it I was in no way seeking to belittle the fear which the passengers undoubtedly experienced. My simple point is that a pressurisation failure correctly handled by the crew, while frightening for those involved, does not justify the sort of sensationalist media coverage which this incident has received.


User currently onlinepenguins From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 278 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4754 times:

"Plunged", really. It was an emergency descent not a free fall. The plane was obviously controllable and it landed safely. Still, though a scary moment for passengers. I have never flown on Ryanair, but could skimpy maintenance be the cause of this?

User currently offlineDaysleeper From UK - England, joined Dec 2009, 838 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4439 times:

Quoting ScottishDavie (Reply 13):
Autobiographical details apart, I don't feel any need to justify my original post but in case there is any doubt about it I was in no way seeking to belittle the fear which the passengers undoubtedly experienced. My simple point is that a pressurisation failure correctly handled by the crew, while frightening for those involved, does not justify the sort of sensationalist media coverage which this incident has received.

It doesn’t perhaps warrant being on the front page of a national newspaper, but it is almost certainly news. I agree that the media often exaggerate aviation story’s to the point of being ridiculous, however the constant downplaying of events on here is becoming equally as ridiculous.

Pressurisation problems have in the past resulted in the loss of an aircraft, and rapid descents have been responsible for injuring passengers, sometimes quite seriously.

Quoting penguins (Reply 14):
"Plunged", really. It was an emergency descent not a free fall. The plane was obviously controllable and it landed safely. Still, though a scary moment for passengers. I have never flown on Ryanair, but could skimpy maintenance be the cause of this?

Plungedv

To descend steeply; fall precipitously:
To become suddenly lower; decrease dramatically:


Sounds like an accurate description of an emergency descent to me.


User currently offlinereadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3187 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 3900 times:

So, the summery is :

Slow news day in the office
A UK aircraft has a cabin pressure problem.
Aircraft descends under control and lands at an airport other than one on my boarding card.
Passengers are delayed and then flown on.

Result, "I thought my number was up"

Ahhhhhhh!  



you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
User currently offlinedogbreath From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2008, 259 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 3827 times:

Quoting Daysleeper (Reply 11):
especially if you can also hear the captain declaring a mayday

For anyone that flies a multi crew commercial aircraft, knows that during a Decompression/Emergency Descent the roles of PF/PM revert immediately to Captain as PF and FO as PM. The PF (ie. Captain) doesn't transmit to ATC (that's the job of the PM), as the Captains' busy handling the aircraft in the descent.

Sure, the Captain makes the initial PA to the cabin to announce to the cabin crew that an emergency descent is 'about' to be carried out, but that's it as far as it goes for the Captain to be dealing with communication of any kind till levelling off.

I smell a rat on this story. I don't see how the passenger (Farter) could have heard the Captain making a Mayday call to ATC. Doesn't add up to me. Do I trust the media for truthful and accurate reporting? - ABSOLUTELY NO WAY

Will have to wait for the IAA report to be published on this one - to get the "FACTS".

As has been written above, a non-story here folks.



Truth, Honour, Loyalty
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 18, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 3776 times:

Quoting dogbreath (Reply 17):
I smell a rat on this story. I don't see how the passenger (Farter) could have heard the Captain making a Mayday call to ATC. Doesn't add up to me. Do I trust the media for truthful and accurate reporting? - ABSOLUTELY NO WAY

Whoever made the mayday call could have had made a PA to the passengers just before the incident and forgotten to switch the audio select panel microphone switch to the relevant VHF radio.
Happened to about everybody using modern aircraft audio / radio systems at least once, e.g. I was doing some tests in the cockpit and wanted to talk to a mechanic using a headset outside the aircraft, but accidentally "talked" to ATC.

Jan


User currently offlineanstar From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2003, 5173 posts, RR: 6
Reply 19, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3693 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 10):
It clearly happens now and then, but emergency descents are hardly routine.

Exactly- how many did we have in the EU last year?

Quoting penguins (Reply 14):
Still, though a scary moment for passengers. I have never flown on Ryanair, but could skimpy maintenance be the cause of this?

I doubt it - the European safety regulators would be on them in a shot if they were unsafe.


User currently offlineDaysleeper From UK - England, joined Dec 2009, 838 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3685 times:

Quoting dogbreath (Reply 17):

I smell a rat on this story. I don't see how the passenger (Farter) could have heard the Captain making a Mayday call to ATC. Doesn't add up to me. Do I trust the media for truthful and accurate reporting? - ABSOLUTELY NO WAY

As someone has already suggested the Mayday was perhaps voiced over the PA in error by who-ever was handling the communication.

I also don’t think it matters if it were the FO or Captain which did it, yes I’m sure that the flight crew followed procedure and it may well have been the FO that made the transmission. However, how would a passenger know the difference if it were indeed an accidental PA? They wouldn’t, also if asked about what they heard then most likely would assume that the captain would be the one declaring the mayday.

There is no conspiracy here, an aircraft lost cabin pressure and made an emergency decent which scared the hell out of the passengers… Not major news, but news all the same.

[Edited 2012-04-07 14:27:20]

User currently offlinelonghauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 4913 posts, RR: 43
Reply 21, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 3666 times:

Quoting ScottishDavie (Reply 13):
In my case one, on a BAC 1-11 many years ago and, yes, it scared me absolutely sh*tless at the time. I could never bring myself to fly on a 1-11 again and I became seriously twitchy about flying generally.

That would have been very interesting. I am not sure you are aware, but a lot of BAC 1-11s were built without emergency passenger oxygen. This is not an oversight, but more than the aircraft was capable of descending to a safer lower altitude VERY quickly.

Most Tridents as well!

I have only seen two pressurization problems in my career, once in a B737-200 and once in a B767-300. In both cases we were able to descend to below 10,000' before the emergency mask deployment was triggered.



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineSandroZRH From Switzerland, joined Feb 2007, 3428 posts, RR: 50
Reply 22, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 3484 times:

Quoting dogbreath (Reply 17):
For anyone that flies a multi crew commercial aircraft, knows that during a Decompression/Emergency Descent the roles of PF/PM revert immediately to Captain as PF and FO as PM

???

Certainly not at my airline    And not according general Airbus SOP as far as I know. What's the point of that anyway?


User currently onlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21526 posts, RR: 55
Reply 23, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3383 times:

Quoting dogbreath (Reply 17):
For anyone that flies a multi crew commercial aircraft, knows that during a Decompression/Emergency Descent the roles of PF/PM revert immediately to Captain as PF and FO as PM.

I wouldn't make a blanket statement about that. We don't do it that way where I fly. A rapid decompression is a pretty involved event already - is it really the best idea to make it even more involved by adding a transfer of controls into the mix (at a time when communication might not be optimal due to oxygen masks being donned, etc.)?

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlinelarspl From Netherlands, joined Apr 2002, 473 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 3209 times:

Quoting dogbreath (Reply 17):
For anyone that flies a multi crew commercial aircraft, knows that during a Decompression/Emergency Descent the roles of PF/PM revert immediately to Captain as PF and FO as PM. The PF (ie. Captain) doesn't transmit to ATC (that's the job of the PM), as the Captains' busy handling the aircraft in the descent.

Sure, the Captain makes the initial PA to the cabin to announce to the cabin crew that an emergency descent is 'about' to be carried out, but that's it as far as it goes for the Captain to be dealing with communication of any kind till levelling off.


According to your profile you say you are a pilot.
I don't see any reason not to trust you. But.

As said before a transfer of control in an emergency descent is not general sop. The two airlines I fly don't.
It is an emergency descent; it is also NOT an SOP to announce such an event to the cabin. That is where we have cabin crew for. Aviate navigate communicate. Communication to the cabin comes last. Period.
Just for clarification, how do you think an emergency descent is handled? Let's follow your thinking.
capt: "o dear co pilot; do you see the cabin pressure dropping?"
co pilot: "uhrg, yes sir i think you are right"
capt: "my controls"
co pilot: "your controls"
capt: "ow, no, your controls again, better speak to the passengers first"
aircraft: "ding ding ding ding ding ding" (think red lights flashing)
capt: "ladies and gentlemen, may i have your attention please, this is your captain speaking. In a few seconds we will commence a live saving procedure called an emergency descent. You may have felt an irritating feeling in your ears for the last couple of minutes, while we here in the front were discussing our options, but this feeling is completely normal. As soon as you have all returned to your seats and fastened your seat belts we'll start the procedure".
co pilot" "sir, i start to feel dizzy, I really think it is a b o u t t i m e"

All joking a side.
In emergencies as a captain it would be something to over think to NOT take control and let the co pilot fly.
It frees you up as the pilot in command to manage the situation and monitor the other pilot.
Also; if you are flying in a flight deck with a steep authority gradient, the co pilot is less likely to speak up in an emergency if the captain is flying. So by letting the least experienced and less senior pilot in the flight deck be the pilot flying, you make sure the most senior guy and pilot in command is really in command.
He might be the co pilot, he is although less experienced, trained and proficient to be a pilot flying in emergencies.
Please read for instance the Avianca crash at New York for an example of a situation where the captain should have had the co pilot do the flying. (yes, way more to it than just that..)



facebook.com/ddaclassicairlines
25 longhauler : At the three airlines at which I flew ... Wardair, merging into Canadi>n, merging into Air Canada, that was and is SOP at all three! In the event o
26 shamrock604 : Em....not quite. It was an Irish aircraft.
27 dogbreath : I'll take it on the chin. Fair statement! I've been in 3 airlines and it was SOP in all three. Seems like it happens in Canada too! Anyway as I said,
28 Post contains images Tristarsteve : There is no evidence that the oxygen maskd deployed. If the reason for the pressurisation problem is lack of air, like an engine bleed or a pack has
29 Post contains images Mir : I had hoped that the second part of my post would have indicated the tongue-in-cheek nature. Then again, it is Ryanair, so I suppose it's more believ
30 Post contains links Quokkas : OK, it is the Sun's coverage, so I can't vouch for the veracity but
31 Tristarsteve : The pilots would not deploy the oxygen masks. They would deploy automatically if the cabin altitude rose above about 14000ft, and the pilots job is t
32 MD11Engineer : On the 737NG at 10,000 ft cabin altitude the pilots will get a cabin altitude warning (horn and light). If the cabin altitude increases further, at 1
33 yeelep : The QRH states: If the cabin altitude exceeds or is expected to exceed 14,000ft, PASSENGER OXYGEN switch ON. So its possible the crew deployed the o2
34 MD11Engineer : The only purpose of this procedure is that the crew makes sure that the pax oxygen masks deploy should the automatic have failed. Jan
35 BoeingGuy : The Boeing QRH has several steps like this to backup the automation, in addition to backing up the automatic rubber jungle deployment after a decompr
36 Mir : QRH-wise, yes, but there's no reason the pilots couldn't decide to drop the masks themselves, even if the plane were flying along normally and the pr
37 BoeingGuy : I'm going to assume that most operations would have a policy against this, unless the crew really had a valid reason to suspect imminent danger to th
38 Mir : Of course there are a number of reasons not to do it, but it is physically possible should the crew wish to. -Mir
39 Eagleboy : I completely agree with the media overreaction to this event, obviously handled correctly by the crew. Howvever I would love to hear what exactly the
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
BA B772: Severe Turbulence And Emergency Descent posted Wed Dec 16 2009 01:14:32 by AirGabon
A350 May Have Automatic Emergency Descent System posted Sat Aug 15 2009 01:07:29 by Aviationbuff
Ryanair Emergency Landing In FCO posted Fri Aug 29 2008 03:11:43 by Airblue
Ryanair-Emergency Ldg In Charleroi. posted Mon Sep 16 2002 12:22:39 by Groholsky
Ryanair 737 Diverts FCO With Land. Gear Emergency posted Fri Aug 29 2008 10:01:23 by AmricanShamrok
Ryanair 737 In Emergency Diversion To Limoges posted Mon Aug 25 2008 22:19:09 by Kaitak
King Air Emergency Landing After 20k Fpm Descent posted Thu Oct 25 2007 19:01:47 by T prop
Ryanair B737 Emergency Landing posted Fri Apr 30 2004 08:48:08 by Nohag
Ryanair's Paphos Base Opened Today posted Thu Apr 5 2012 07:55:33 by ju068
80 Year Old Woman Lands Plane In Emergency posted Tue Apr 3 2012 04:12:54 by MadameConcorde