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Are US Carriers Wasteful With Inflight Bev Svc?  
User currently offlinequestions From Australia, joined Sep 2011, 842 posts, RR: 1
Posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 11541 times:

US carriers pour inflight beverages from cans, LOTS of cans. Carriers outside of the US pour soft drinks, juices, and water from larger containers.

Are US carriers wasteful? Should US carriers adopt this practice?

59 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21793 posts, RR: 55
Reply 1, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 11437 times:

It's only wasteful if they're not charging enough to cover whatever extra costs are involved.

Since it's very easy to get dehydrated in the dry air of an airplane, I've got no problem with them handing out full cans. I only wish they'd do it with orange juice as well - normally they pour that out of a carton.

-Mir



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User currently offlinesilentbob From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 2147 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 11433 times:

The waste problem is the lack of recycling programs.

User currently offlineHPRamper From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4097 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 11425 times:

As far as I know most if not all of the U.S. domestic carriers recycle their aluminum cans.

User currently offlineSpacepope From Vatican City, joined Dec 1999, 2969 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 11405 times:

Quoting questions (Thread starter):

US carriers pour inflight beverages from cans, LOTS of cans. Carriers outside of the US pour soft drinks, juices, and water from larger containers.

Cans are very easy and economical to recycle. Aluminum is also a commodity these days (at $.55 per pound) so you can bet some beancounter has taken the scrap price into account.

These cans aboard aircraft never hit the landfill.



The last of the famous international playboys
User currently offlinemayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10585 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 11302 times:

Quoting HPRamper (Reply 3):
As far as I know most if not all of the U.S. domestic carriers recycle their aluminum cans.

DL has had a can recycling program for quite awhile. In SLC, the cans were sold to Reynolds Aluminum and the money went to the local employees fund.



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlinekpitrrat From United States of America, joined Oct 2011, 194 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 11288 times:

Quoting Spacepope (Reply 4):
These cans aboard aircraft never hit the landfill.

Ah, I wish I could say that was true, however, I have seen otherwise. In addition, wouldn't the Int'l cans be sent to the incinerator with the rest of the trash?


User currently offlineAsiaflyer From Singapore, joined May 2007, 1147 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 11218 times:

Quoting Spacepope (Reply 4):
Cans are very easy and economical to recycle. Aluminum is also a commodity these days (at $.55 per pound) so you can bet some beancounter has taken the scrap price into account.


Aluminum takes a lot of energy to produce. On top of that, all the transportation for the recycling, as well as energy used to melt it down to make new aluminum cans consumes a lot of energy. Drinks out of cartons are much better for the environment.

Quoting Mir (Reply 1):
Since it's very easy to get dehydrated in the dry air of an airplane, I've got no problem with them handing out full cans. I only wish they'd do it with orange juice as well - normally they pour that out of a carton.


Ask for a one more glass of juice if you are thirsty.  



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User currently offlineaklrno From United States of America, joined Dec 2010, 971 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 10987 times:

Even if you don't put the can into a recycling bin, most major cities sort the main waste stream anyway. Ferrous metals are sucked out with a magnet. Non-ferrous (such as AL) are sucked out with an eddy current and electric or magnetic field. AL will even survive an incinerator.

Plastics are not valuable enough to be as certain of recycling from the waste stream. An attempt is made, but not always successful. Plastic in an incinerator makes a nice fuel.

I think it would be difficult to pick a winner from either an economic or resource point of view.

Another issue is the cost of providing good service to the customer. Most people could last perfectly well for an hour of two with no drink at all. As a customer, I prefer to get a can I can drink at my leisure instead of hoping an FA can make it back to my seat in economy for a refill. The additional cost of making me hate the airline just slightly less may be worth it.

The one airline that almost never gives me the whole can is WN because the way they serve drinks makes that difficult, but they are usually so fast that I can get a refill if I want it.

Pointless aside: last Thanksgiving day I handed out small boxes of candy to the crew (WN). I got so many refills I nearly drowned on a 1 hour flight.


User currently offlinekfitz From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 10947 times:

It is SOP at Continental Airlines to withhold the full can from customers, a distinction they share only with Southwest in the US. An apparent pennywise move that has yet to be streamlined in their merger.

[Edited 2012-04-22 23:08:20]

User currently offlineRyanairGuru From Australia, joined Oct 2006, 5903 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 10888 times:

Quoting questions (Thread starter):
US carriers pour inflight beverages from cans, LOTS of cans. Carriers outside of the US pour soft drinks, juices, and water from larger containers.

Umm, out of interest when was the last time you were on a plane in Australia?

The situation is exactly the same here: soft drinks are in cans. It's a bit unfair to single the Americans out over this...



Worked Hard, Flew Right
User currently offlinejoffie From Australia, joined Mar 2006, 814 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 10880 times:

Quoting RyanairGuru (Reply 12):

In the US, I believe soft drinks are free to the passengers, despite the airline being a LCC or not. In Australia, the only airline to offer free soft drink is Qantas, and you only get a mini can.

Virgin, Tiger and Jetstar make you pay up to $2.50-$3.00 for a can. I would be dissapointed if I had to pay, and they just poured some out for me from a container.


User currently offlineRyanairGuru From Australia, joined Oct 2006, 5903 posts, RR: 5
Reply 12, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 10830 times:

Quoting joffie (Reply 13):
Qantas, and you only get a mini can.

Fair enough. I was thinking QF specifically with that comment but I had forgotten that they were smaller than normal cans.



Worked Hard, Flew Right
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 13, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 10817 times:

Quoting questions (Thread starter):
Are US Carriers Wasteful With Inflight Bev Svc?

Before I respond to this thread, I have to ask the OP: How is it wasteful?

And your entire post was not very specific nor informative either.....   



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlinegigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 14, posted (2 years 7 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 10782 times:

Quoting kfitz (Reply 11):
It is SOP at Continental Airlines to withhold the full can from customers, a distinction they share only with Southwest in the US. An apparent pennywise move that has yet to be streamlined in their merger.

There is no such thing as Continental Airlines.

At United they have been doing this on all flights for a year. Of course, the sUA flight attendants rebelled at this as well as recycling the cans, since its "more work". So the good ones do it, and the douches do not.

NS


User currently offlinenighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5178 posts, RR: 33
Reply 15, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 9291 times:

Quoting RyanairGuru (Reply 10):
Umm, out of interest when was the last time you were on a plane in Australia?


.. or europe? Every airline i've flown always uses cans. I have yet to see an airline dispense soft drinks from a bottle.

[Edited 2012-04-23 05:35:25]


That'll teach you
User currently offlineTomFoolery From Austria, joined Jan 2004, 529 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 9145 times:

Quoting Asiaflyer (Reply 7):
Drinks out of cartons are much better for the environment.

Paper containers do not work for carbonated drinks.


There are many carriers worldwide who serve drinks in cans. Some are mini 6 oz. cans, some are 12 oz cans (mostly in the US). Some elect to serve half of the cans over ice (6 oz + ice = 8 oz cup serving). This way one can can provide 2 servings. Others offer the full can, which has the advantage of ease and speed of cabin service, and a reduced likelyhood of refills, and a generally more contented customer. Air France, for example, uses mini cans on some (but not all) of their flights.

The Europeans have refillable bottles (.75 liter, 1 liter, and in some cases, 1.5 liter). This is all well when the destination and the origin use the same system. This would not work on routes to the US. Other carriers use non refillable plastic bottles, which gets the same treatment as the cans. The question is where do both of these go, once they are tossed in the bag? We the passenger do not see this, and can either ask someone in the know, or speculate.

At the end of the day, it is WEIGHT, and the cost of transporting weight that determines the media of the container. What weighs more: 1 x12 ounce can, 2 x 6 oz mini can, 1 x 1 liter bottle, etc.? Take the top 2 items, and cost compare them for initial price, and finally, how much does it cost to deliver to the passenger. Before we say that it only takes a few more seconds to pour a drink from a bottle, vs hand a can and a cup to a passenger, it is important to remember that one's day is often full of tasks of similiar duration..



Paper makes an airplane fly
User currently offlineMark2fly1034 From United States of America, joined Oct 2011, 130 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 8782 times:

DL does not give the full can unless you ask for but I have never had a problem getting the full can on any flight that I have wanted it. Also DL does recycle the plastic cups, usually when you hand your trash in the FA has a hand full of plastic cups in one hand.

User currently offlinekgaiflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 4319 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 8602 times:
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Quoting questions (Thread starter):
Carriers outside of the US pour soft drinks, juices, and water from larger containers.

Last time I flew AF CDG-LHR, they were using little single-serving cans -- easily stored and easily recycled.


User currently offlinekgaiflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 4319 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 8489 times:
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Quoting Asiaflyer (Reply 7):
Aluminum takes a lot of energy to produce. On top of that, all the transportation for the recycling, as well as energy used to melt it down to make new aluminum cans consumes a lot of energy. Drinks out of cartons are much better for the environment.

That's a completely different (and unlinked) equation since a number of aluminum smelters are located adjacent to hydroelectric power.


User currently offlinekgaiflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 4319 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 8401 times:
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Quoting kfitz (Reply 9):
a distinction they share only with Southwest in the US.

And OO and EV and RP and CP and QK .


User currently offlinecrj200faguy From United States of America, joined May 2007, 400 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 8329 times:

They should just eliminate the beverage service on flights less than 2 hours.

User currently offlinetotesen From Mexico, joined Dec 2008, 64 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 8265 times:

Quoting crj200faguy (Reply 21):
They should just eliminate the beverage service on flights less than 2 hours.

i hope you are joking



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User currently offlinejumpjets From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2012, 868 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 8176 times:

Quoting nighthawk (Reply 15):
or europe? Every airline i've flown always uses cans. I have yet to see an airline dispense soft drinks from a bottle.

Fruit juice and water tend to come from large cartons or plastic bottles when its free - fizzy drinks from cans. And if you are on LCC buying fizzy drinks beware that one carrier did [and may still do] try and charge as much for a 150ml can as you would pay for a 1.5L bottle in a supermarket. Even the steward agreed with me that it was a rip off when I refused it.


User currently offlineUALWN From Andorra, joined Jun 2009, 2889 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (2 years 7 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 8096 times:

Quoting nighthawk (Reply 15):
I have yet to see an airline dispense soft drinks from a bottle.

Then I guess you haven't flown LH much... I dread their Coke poured from a 2 liter (or is it 1.5?) warm plastic bottle onto a cup containing a single ice cube...



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25 Post contains links boeingfever777 : While Delta and Virgin America topped the list, each received a score of only B-, followed by Virgin Atlantic and Southwest, which each scored Cs. Con
26 DiamondFlyer : What a joke. Why would they even waste their time then? I'll go for that, they day TSA allows us to carry thru our own beverages and not be stuck pur
27 BC77008 : Everyone on my flight gets a full can. I'm just not organized enough to put half full cans back where they belong so it's actually less work for me. P
28 B6A322 : I think its worth noting that the airlines predominantly use larger plastic bottles for soda and cartons for juices etc. on long haul flights, which
29 ckfred : In the U.S. carbonated beverages aren't offered in cartons. The common containers are 12 oz cans, 20 oz plastic bottles, 2 Liter plastic bottles, or
30 vanguard737 : Being an American, I do not waste my beverage service when flying Lufthansa in order to drink 6oz. of warm Coke. I go straight for the free beer, fre
31 B727FA : That's only because they're following the guidelines of the major carrier for which they're flying. At DL we recycle the plastic, paper, cans, bottle
32 eurowings : The last time I flew AB and LH short-haul they were definitely dispensing soft drinks from bottles. I think the reason for this may legitimately be c
33 mayor : I doubt that the cartons that are used for juice and milk products could be recycled, anyway, considering the waxy coating on the cardboard used to m
34 kngkyle : I've also noticed on my last DL flight that they are now saving the plastic cups as well. I think it's a relatively new policy because I hadn't notice
35 Continental : Honestly, I feel the beverage service is unnecessary. For a 1 hour flight, can't you just wait until you land to get something to drink? Or better yet
36 DiamondFlyer : Again, I'm all for it, once TSA gets rid of the silly you can't bring liquids into the sterile area. The shops in the terminal have such an outrageou
37 CoachClass : How do you know all FA don't do it? What do the bad ones do, throw the cans out the window?
38 Post contains images LOWS : Because most people here drink Coke warm and in moderation. Not everyone can down a 24oz coke on a flight from FRA to VIE. A standard serving of Coke
39 Roseflyer : I know it was looked at being cut from flights under 500 miles, but it came down to passengers wanting beverage service. If the flight is long enough
40 gigneil : No, they walk through the cabin with one bag as opposed to two. NS
41 Viscount724 : KL has been using the small cans, at least on intra-Europe flights, as long as I can remember. Their beverage selection in Y class is very limited -
42 falstaff : What about cans loaded at DTW? I assume they have to pay the 10 cent deposit, just as I did when I had a commercial account for my pop machines. Does
43 Roseflyer : Airlines do not pay the deposits on cans because the beverages are intended for consumption on their premises. It is the same for the airlines as it
44 crj200faguy : Are you one of those "I have to take a pill. Can I have a bottle of water from first class?" kind of people?
45 777ord : United only gives you the can IF you request it. But, serves all juices/water from larger containers. Do note, United does have a very good recycling
46 softrally : I never got a full can on KE- they only gave me a cup out of the can (250ml or 12oz depending on flight origin). They seem to use cartons for juice.
47 DiamondFlyer : Not at all. I'm just saying that if you get rid of beverages on flights, vendor's aren't stupid. They know they have the market cornered, and will ja
48 falstaff : Bars in Michigan keep their beer/pop cans and bottles for return to the distributors for return credit. When I owned pop machines I paid a deposit on
49 UALWN : Which I would call an abomination.
50 g38 : Wasteful or not, I want the can. With what they charge for airfair these days, its the lease they can do. Those stupid plastic cups when full of ice b
51 kgaiflyer : Beverage temperature is apparently a cultural thing. For instance, in West Texas and southern New Mexico I've seen folks drink bottled Mexican Coke (
52 SSTeve : Sometimes when connections are tight and boarding and taxi times long, even on "short" flights, I'm dying for a drink. Which is actually why I'd be h
53 mayor : Perhaps the carriers, and DL in particular, get a good enough deal on the bulk orders of Coke products (or whatever the carrier happens to serve), th
54 Post contains images dc9northwest : Well, you actually get less coke per serving in the US... I mean, they serve you coke with a coke:ice ratio of 1:3 at best. Ridiculous, IMO. If I wan
55 gigneil : Like Chinese food containers, those are (mostly) compostable, and (always) HIGHLY recyclable. The waxy coating generally can be washed off by a biode
56 zrs70 : I prefer airlines that pour from a bottle. There is too much in a can, and I usually end up throwing most it away. That is a waste.
57 gigneil : That just makes them terrible people, then, if they don't choose to recycle. NS
58 mayor : But they DO recycle. I just mentioned that they probably get a good enough deal from Coke, systemwide, on their products that it makes no difference
59 AirframeAS : They do, yes. But sometimes they don't. And when they don't, they don't have the time to when turning airplanes around after completing a bank and mo
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