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30 Years Ago Today Braniff Shuts Down  
User currently offlinesunking737 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2057 posts, RR: 9
Posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 15160 times:

"It was a rainy day in May of 1982. Pilots were getting messages to return to DFW. Rumors of a "Pilot Strike" were being used for the reason. Little did people know that a once great airline was being shut down. May 12th 1982 would become a sad day for many in The BRANIFF Family." from http://www.braniffpages.com/

Does anyone have memories of this day or of Braniff its self??


Just an MSPAVGEEK
72 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25871 posts, RR: 22
Reply 1, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 15155 times:

Reminds me of this photo of the Braniff terminal at DFW shortly after they ceased operations.

http://xplane10.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/2-25-death-of-bi.png


User currently offlineglobalflyer From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 940 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 14958 times:

Thanks so much. I just posted the same thing. This picture just fascinates me. BN was the best airline. The people, the planes, everything. You will always be remembered!


Landing on every Continent almost on an annual basis!
User currently offlinejfk777 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 8457 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 14879 times:
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Very sad end to an airline which took the naval look out of planes. Harding Laurence was a pioneer who had limitless ambition. HE needed to merge with PAN AM.

User currently offlinechepos From Puerto Rico, joined Dec 2000, 6229 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 14859 times:

RIP Braniff, that is a creepy picture.

Regards,

Chepos



Fly the Flag!!!!
User currently offlineNWAROOSTER From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1130 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 14718 times:
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Harding Laurence over expanded Braniff's flights to just keep from forfeiting them. Braniff was flying empty flights in the middle of the night. He caused the failure of Braniff.
As a side note. While Braniff shut down, the IAM took on a strike at Northwest Airlines with the prime issue being that Northwest wanted to establish part time help in the classifications below mechanic, such as Equipment Services, Stock Clerk and Cleaner. The IAM won the strike and part time help was not established. Part time help did not appear at Northwest until the merger with Republic Airlines which had part time help in the lower classifications.   


User currently offlineB757forever From United States of America, joined May 2010, 425 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 14637 times:

I remember that day in May of 1982 as I was in A&P school in Ft Worth when Braniff shut down. I completed my courses and got my licenses in June of 1982. I quickly found there were virtually no jobs for A&P Mechanics as they had all been filled by former Braniff workers.
Shortly after the shutdown, I drove through DFW Airport and saw the masses of parked Braniff 727s. It was such a sad sight to see.


User currently offlineSeptember11 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 3623 posts, RR: 21
Reply 7, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 14515 times:

I love the picture above! I remember the reincarnation of Braniff III. Shut down for good in early 1990s.

[Edited 2012-05-12 17:38:50]


Airliners.net of the Future
User currently offlinecontrails From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 1834 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 14477 times:

It's been 30 years? Incredible!

I lived in the Metroplex when this happened. I had traveled on BN quite often, including a trip to LGW. I was taken back when the news came out, and it seemed to me like the whole Metroplex was under a cloud.

I drove out to DFW a few days after the shutdown and saw the planes sitting there. It is to this day one of the most depressing sights I've ever seen.

The saying "Gone but not Forgotten" is what I think of when I think of Braniff.



Flying Colors Forever!
User currently offlinedelawareusa From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 107 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 14339 times:

Used to fly them from Mexico City to DFW in the mid 70s. Was sad when they shut down.

User currently offlinebobbypsp From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 32 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 14097 times:

The beginning of the end so to speak...

I was working on the phones at United @ Atlanta Reservations when this was announced


User currently offline802flyguy From United States of America, joined May 2012, 215 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 13688 times:

This sad anniversary sent me Gogling; I found this interesting article concerning the doings of Scott Spencer who had a great to do with the demise of Braniff II and Braniff III

http://opinion.latimes.com/opinionla...orts-new-baggage-tag-code-fbi.html

"The years-in-the-making grand plan to convert the shuttered Norton Air Force Base into the grandly named San Bernardino International Airport, a hub of commercial flight, is now more than an expensive and protracted affair. It's a federal criminal investigation.

"The FBI has swept up phones, computers and documents from sundry airport agency and development offices and from what the San Bernardino Sun calls the rented gated mansion of airport developer Scot Spencer....

...How much clearer could it be? Not clear enough, it seems. If Scot Spencer had stolen a piece of luggage from an airport baggage carousel, he could never even get hired as a skycap. Yet Spencer, who had a hand in tanking an entire airline, still gets work developing SBIA."


I only flew the original BN once, a short SFO-LAX trip on a DC-8-62, but managed to ride Braniff III a few more times. As an aviation obsessed kid, I always admired the airline's style and panache. It was sad to see it go under. Amazing that has been thirty years.


User currently offlineNorthstarBoy From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1863 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 13010 times:
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I was 14 when BN shut down and living in Colorado, so my exposure to them was limited to just one set of flights taken two months before the shutdown. Years later, I had a co-worker who worked for the original Braniff. We got to talking about Fat Albert and she shared a story, i paraphrase:

When the order came to shut down, Fat Albert was in flight from Dallas to Honolulu. The story went that operations called the crew and informed them that the airline had shut down and they were all out of work, operations gave them the option of landing in Los Angeles and disembarking all the passengers then flying the plane back empty. According to my coworker, the captain replied, "We have 450 passengers who paid to fly to Hawaii and by god we're going to take them there." So the crew took the passengers the rest of the way, disembarked one load of passengers then supposedly picked up the other load of passengers waiting to fly back to Dallas and flew them back. My coworker said she knew people who were on the flight back and she described it as the wildest party in the sky.

My one experience on Braniff happened in March of 1982, flying from Denver to Ft Lauderdale for spring break. What really stands out was the hop from Miami to Ft Lauderdale. It was a clear night, we leveled off at 3,000 feet and slowed down to 200 miles an hour on a St. Patrick's day green 727. Sitting on the left side of the plane, I could see all of south florida lit up like a golden christmas tree. There were strings of gold lights as far as the eye could see. It's a sight I'll never forget as long as I live and I thank Braniff for giving me that memory. Ironically, my brother, who came in the next day along with my mother, didnt get that treatment. He and mom ended up driving from Miami to Ft Lauderdale on a chartered greyhound bus because their plane had to take a plane load of passengers from a canceled flight back to Dallas.

Braniff truly was a class act.

BTW, I thought I read somewhere that Harding Lawrence passed away this week. Ironic that he'd pass away so close to the thirtieth anniversary of the passing away of the Flying Colors.



Why are people so against low yields?! If lower yields means more people can travel abroad, i'm all for it
User currently offlinetype-rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 12482 times:

Quoting NorthstarBoy (Reply 12):
BTW, I thought I read somewhere that Harding Lawrence passed away this week.

No, Mr. Lawrence passed away in January of 2002 at age 81. He was married to Mary Wells, the advertising exec that got the Braniff advertising account as her new agencies very first account. She helped with the designs that made Braniff what it was in the late 60's. She is still around. Besides Braniff she also had Ford, Alka-Seltzer and BIC as accounts.


User currently offlineDTWPurserBoy From United States of America, joined Feb 2010, 1729 posts, RR: 7
Reply 14, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 12369 times:

I flew for Braniff International for 8 years-it was a truly unique organization with its own set of problems. Harding Lawrence (please note the correct spelling of his name) ran the airline like a monarchy. When he moved the corporate headquarters from Exchange Park near Love Field to DFW he had an incredible apartment built for himself INSIDE the building, complete with a private swimming pool (that leaked into the Human Resources Department below.) He had an insatiable ego, made many poor decisions and hired some questionable executives. Braniff also owned a villa in Acapulco for the exclusive use of its senior executives and on Friday nights first class would be packed with them. You always knew Harding was going to be aboard if you got on the aircraft and there was a bottle of Chivas sitting on the counter--the scotch we normally used was Dewars. For many years after Braniff had disposed of the BAC-111 fleet, they kept one airplane,(N1543) painted in a non-descript paint job, for the personal use by Harding, Ed Acker or whoever they decided could use it. Occasionally, it was leased out to various celebrities--I remember Cher used it at least once--but the costs of maintaining one airplane and keeping pilots and certain select f/a's qualified on it were enormous.

I was in management for a couple of years and every month there was something called "Management Club" in Dallas--most of us blew it off except for 2 nights per year--"Chairman"s Night" and "President's Night." Attendance at those was mandatory. A nice dinner was served. The "entertainment" at one Chairman's Night consisted of Harding and Mary Wells showing a slide presentation of all the homes they owned around the world--a house in Dallas, a co-op in New York, a villa in southern France (where Mary Wells Lawrence lives today) and a ranch out in Colorado or Wyoming someplace, as well as a home in Acapulco. This was being shown to people who took home on average $400 every two weeks. And what was really scary was listening to the comments of people seated around me saying things like "Isn't it just wonderful that they want to share this with us?"

Harding was eventually fired by the Board of Directors. John Casey took over then. When Casey resigned and went to Pan Am was, in retrospect, when I realized that the rats were leaving the sinking ship. One can only wonder what would happen today if a chief executive used funds in a publicly held corporation for personal use.

The real Braniff were the rank and file employees--wonderful people--who ran the airline in a professional and safe manner. They were the ones most hurt by the shutdown. The senior executives grabbed the cash and ran. With proper leadership, Braniff might not be a stand alone airline today but at least would have been a viable partner for a merger. They came close to merging with Eastern and Pan Am at various times but it just never materialized.

Oh well, we all moved on to bigger and better things. But Braniff International's first class service was legendary--our executive chef, Willy Rossell made sure of that. I remember him standing next to me as I carved a Chateaubriand once saying "Always add meat to sauce, never sauce to meat. Cheap cuts of meat are covered in liquid."



Qualified on Concorde/B707/B720/B727/B737/B747/B757/B767/B777/DC-8/DC-9/DC-10/A319/A320/A330/MD-88-90
User currently offlinetraindoc From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 363 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 11973 times:

My first jet A/C flight was in 1967, on a Braniff 720, from HOU to DAL. We even had breakfast on that flight of 1 hour! Ever since then I have been hooked on flying.

And yes, BN was a special airline which stood out from all the others. Now, if you want to have that type of flying experience, you will have to fly the likes of SQ, EK, etc. Air travel in the U.S. is now either Walmart (coach) or Costco (first class).


User currently offlineDTWPurserBoy From United States of America, joined Feb 2010, 1729 posts, RR: 7
Reply 16, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 11248 times:

One of the many great, unsolved mysteries of Braniff International was what happened to its extensive and VERY valuable collection of South American art. Various terminals, (DFW and MCI come to mind) had glass-enclosed cases displaying antiquities and original art work and pottery. Every Braniff airplane had original Peruvian molas on the bulkheads and the General Offices and training facilities had much on display. All of it mysteriously disappeared right under the eyes of the bankruptcy court. Guess we'll never know what really happened although I would like John Nance, a former Braniff pilot and now a great writer, to update his 1983 book "Splash of Colors." It is probably the most accurate version of the demise of one of America's greatest airlines but I am sure that over the years more information has come to him that would make very interesting reading.


Qualified on Concorde/B707/B720/B727/B737/B747/B757/B767/B777/DC-8/DC-9/DC-10/A319/A320/A330/MD-88-90
User currently offlineokie From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 3151 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 11031 times:

Quoting B757forever (Reply 6):
I remember that day in May of 1982 as I was in A&P school in Ft Worth when Braniff shut down. I completed my courses and got my licenses in June of 1982. I quickly found there were virtually no jobs for A&P Mechanics as they had all been filled by former Braniff workers.


I had a friend who worked Mx for BN and when the shut down happened the creditors/bankruptcy court locked down all the facilities. It took practically six months before any of the Mx staff could recoup their personal tools and equipment. It was only with help from friends who loaned him tools and an understanding new boss and coworkers that he could regain employment.

Okie


User currently offlinelonghauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 5132 posts, RR: 43
Reply 18, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 10976 times:

Quoting DTWPurserBoy (Reply 16):
Guess we'll never know what really happened although I would like John Nance, a former Braniff pilot and now a great writer, to update his 1983 book "Splash of Colors." It is probably the most accurate version of the demise of one of America's greatest airlines but I am sure that over the years more information has come to him that would make very interesting reading.

I agree, this book reads like an adventure novel, and is well worth the effort to buy and read.

Clearly he had a lot of inside information, and as you state, likely has even more now.



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineCargolex From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 1278 posts, RR: 8
Reply 19, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 10751 times:

Quoting DTWPurserBoy (Reply 16):
I would like John Nance, a former Braniff pilot and now a great writer, to update his 1983 book "Splash of Colors." It is probably the most accurate version of the demise of one of America's greatest airlines but I am sure that over the years more information has come to him that would make very interesting reading.

That would be fantastic. That's a great book, and very accurately outlines the organizational problems that lay underneath the glossy exterior. It would be genuinely interesting to hear what revelations have come about since publication. It's already a very good read and a good cautionary tale about how to manage a business.


User currently offlinebohica From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2740 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 10617 times:

Quoting NorthstarBoy (Reply 12):
the captain replied, "We have 450 passengers who paid to fly to Hawaii and by god we're going to take them there."

I read than in an article one time and according to the article the captain then said "What are they going to do? Fire me?"
I can't remember what publication it was in. I want to say Airliners or Airways. It's been a long time.   

Quoting DTWPurserBoy (Reply 14):
One can only wonder what would happen today if a chief executive used funds in a publicly held corporation for personal use.

Several years at Club Fed.


User currently offlinetype-rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 9717 times:

The stories of Harding Lawrence and his "manage by fear" method of management was legendary. He could also blow his top in a method that could be heard for hundreds of feet around him!

One time his daughter who was going to Duke took Eastern as Braniff didn't go there. On a trip back to Dallas, Eastern lost her luggage. He went over to the Eastern ticket counter and made a scene that had the entire terminal cringing.

He knew how each and every service was to be performed. One time a F/A had a glass turned the wrong way on the tray and when HL received it and saw the mistake he threw the entire tray back at her.

F/A's were known to call in sick if they knew HL was going to be on their flight that day.

Another F/A was non-reving and had HK sitting next to her. I believe the flight was DFW-LGA. She said he couldn't have been nicer and totally the gentleman. It was totally unexpected!

One Braniff place was HL's palace. On the walls there were original paintings, not copies.

HL's idea of expansion was "do it while you can" as he thought deregulation wouldn't last and that the industry would be re-regulated in a few years and airlines would be able to keep whatever routes that they had expanded into. This never happened and Braniff was not able to afford this mass expansion. Didn't they start like 24 new cities in one day?

I always liked the BAC-111. I think it was the perfect plane for their mid continent routes.

But if you look at the Braniff 1972 annual report, there is a section which details the fact that the board was already
concered with the rising price of jet fuel and was seeking ways to save fuel.

[Edited 2012-05-13 11:12:20]

User currently offlineSingaporeBoy From Singapore, joined May 2005, 142 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 9664 times:

What was the inflight service like and what was the FAs uniform like?Did they have both male and female FAs?I rremember they used to fly to Asia to Singapore on their beautiful orange 747SPs.Never got to see their crews at Paya Lebar airport and wondered if they layovered in SIN at that time.

User currently offlinetype-rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 9164 times:

I never flew BN internationally, but I imagine it was just slightly better than the domestic service, which was wonderful.
Food choices were excellent, premium liquor was served in F. The F/A's always friendly.

The F/A's wore geometric Pucci outfits in bright bold colors, like celery green with purple and black and white. Later on they migrated to Halston uniforms which were brown suits with champagne colored shirts and ties. Very professional looking.
Any way you look at it Braniff certainly did stand out from the rest of the airlines. And I would go as far as to say that Braniff had
a look that changed F/A uniforms forever.

They have photos of these uniforms at http://www.braniffpages.com.


User currently offlineDTWPurserBoy From United States of America, joined Feb 2010, 1729 posts, RR: 7
Reply 24, posted (2 years 6 months 2 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 9147 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 21):
The stories of Harding Lawrence and his "manage by fear" method of management was legendary. He could also blow his top in a method that could be heard for hundreds of feet around him!



He could indeed have monumental temper tantrums. The rule was to place a glass in front of a f/c passenger turned so that the Braniff logo was visible. Flight Attendant 101 stuff. One of our established procedures was for the dessert cart was to use the silver champagne bucket and tastefully arrange to fruit in it for presentation. On one flight, Harding saw that, threw the champagne bucket across the cabin and screamed "champagne buckets are for champagne."

One day, shortly after starting our service to LGW, the 747 for that flight had a mechanical and HL threw a fit. He was flying to LGW that night and by God it was going to be on a Braniff flight! With only 2 747's in the fleet at that time and one down, this presented a major obstacle. So Marketing "wet-leased" a 747 with pilots and flight attendants from Wardair Canada for this one flight. By a stroke of sheer genius, Wardair had picked up the other "original" 747 that BI had never taken delivery of and left the interior in the original color scheme. Myself and another Braniff f/a were the only two real Braniff employees working the flight but I did all the announcements calling the flight Braniff International Flight 601 (I think it was) to London-Gatwick. Everything went very smoothly, Mr. Lawrence was a perfect gentleman and sought out the other f/a and myself to tank us after landing. I can only imagine what it cost to charter that airplane for a one-way flight!

Quoting SingaporeBoy (Reply 22):
What was the inflight service like and what was the FAs uniform like?Did they have both male and female FAs?I rremember they used to fly to Asia to Singapore on their beautiful orange 747SPs.Never got to see their crews at Paya Lebar airport and wondered if they layovered in SIN at that time.



Yes, Braniff had many male flight attendants. In South America they had been around since the fifties or even earlier but they did not come to the domestic system until 1973. I was fortunate enough to be among the first males hired. Our original uniforms were designed by Emilio Pucci and were the basic pilot's uniform--black, double breasted with brass buttons and a pilots hat. We had one gold stripe on the sleeve. The only difference was that the pilot uniform was dark blue.

Later, in about 1977, Braniff chose designer Halston to create a new look which included beige ultra-suede overcoats, a beige suit for both the men and women and an "H" print tie for the men and a blouse, skirt and waist sash in the same print for the ladies. The men wore "ecru" colored shirts (a light beige color). We really turned heads walking through terminals with our Hartmann luggage.

Service was very much like international service today of SQ and other carriers. We did a 6 cart presentation in first class and even in coach we served complimentary rose wine and "cappucino"--really all that was was hot chocolate, coffee and brandy. F/C service was done in "French" style, holding the two serving instruments in one hand and placing the food on the plates. They made us practice it and practice it until we could all do it. We even did what was essentially the same service in FC domestically on longer flights with a slightly abbreviated service from DFW to ORD. Meat was carved at passenger side, salad was served the same and desserts were things like Cherries Jubilee, Crepe Suzettes and Baked Alaska. As I recall there was a choice of 5 entrees in FC and 3 in YC internationally. There was no BC back then.



Qualified on Concorde/B707/B720/B727/B737/B747/B757/B767/B777/DC-8/DC-9/DC-10/A319/A320/A330/MD-88-90
25 jmbweeboy : I gather from what I've read here Lawrence was to Braniff what Leona Helmsley was to her hotels ? JMBWEEBOY
26 Post contains images CitationJet : My parents were non-revs on the last flight Braniff operated - flight 502 from HNL to DFW, which left HNL on May 12, 1982 and arrived in DFW the morn
27 longhauler : This has been reported often, and I always had a problem with it. Namely you have 450 passengers going away on vacation, (well most of them anyway, o
28 CitationJet : Most passengers on the DFW to HNL flights do not start their trip in DFW, so they wouldn't have been home either. They would have been in a city that
29 WA707atMSP : It was in Splash of Colors, of course. Here is the exact quote: "Chic Smalley, flight engineer on Flight 501, raised Dallas operations (OCC) on the V
30 Post contains links and images Viscount724 : As a sidenote, Braniff also leased the CP Air 747-200 below for about a month in November/December 1978, possibly to cover for an aircraft in mainten
31 DTWPurserBoy : You are correct. Braniff was scrambling in late 1978-79 for 747's for lease or sale and there just were not any available. We did lease that CP Air pl
32 ModernArt : This plane made a cameo appearance in an episode of "The Rockford Files." Jim and Rocky are on vacation in Hawaii. Its sitting in the background in o
33 incitatus : Thanks for your postings. That was awesome.
34 Fi642 : The beginning of the end. Braniff had class. I worked for BN II. They had class, pride, and a work ethic no one else has. Now? So sad. It's not a care
35 type-rated : And then there were a few who worked for all three versions of Braniff.
36 milesrich : I remember that Thursday afternoon as if it was yesterday. I was living in Dallas, and there were tornado warnings. I had flown on what turned to be m
37 DTWPurserBoy : Putnam's mistake was not to have DIP financing in place but then no airline had ever gone bankrupt. The deal with Hyatt and PSA fell apart partly due
38 OzarkD9S : Growing up in an airline family I vividly recall the shutdown of Braniff. It was the first major US airline failure and really did send chills through
39 TWA1985 : I was talking to a fellow aviation enthusiastic a few years back and he referred to Braniff II as ... "pretty much the original Braniff." According to
40 type-rated : Not quite, Braniff II was bought and run by Jay Pritzker family of Chicago and the Hyatt Hotel chain. Even though he claimed no airline experience, th
41 rampart : Would anyone here know if BN (version 1.0) had orders or were shopping for new aircraft near their end, aircraft other than the 727, DC-8, or 747? Wer
42 deltacto : Were there revenue passengers on the last flight BN 502 HNL-DFW? If so, who did the ground handling since the flight departed HNL after it was known
43 WA707atMSP : Braniff considered the 757 and L-1011-500 as 727 and DC-8-62 replacements in 1978 / 79. From 1980 onward, Braniff's situation was so grim that they w
44 WA707atMSP : Going a little OT, I think Braniff's "Ultra" colors would have looked SENSATIONAL on a 757-200, especially the dark blue scheme! It is a shame they d
45 planespotting : This reminds me of the recollection of how Bob Crandall heard the news (from the book Hard Landing). He and another executive were on an AA 727 on th
46 SouthernDC9 : Is the random Braniff tag still at the end of South Park episodes? One of my earliest memories is being at MEM and seeing a dark blue Braniff 727, whi
47 skycub : One of the things I recall reading in "Splash of Colors" is that, ironically, once Braniff was shut down and auditors started going through the Branif
48 type-rated : It was always rumored that Howard Putnam was brought in not to save Braniff, but to shut it down.
49 skycub : I know that Southwest Airlines was not the company it is today... but by the early 80's it had accomplished nearly a decade of profits and was alread
50 bobbypsp : FYI- "Hard Landing" Available at Amazon as an e-book[Edited 2012-05-14 16:29:26]
51 Post contains images sunking737 : Sun Country picked up N275AF after Air Florida shut down because it was an ex Braniff A/C. SY was formed by EX BN employees.
52 skycub : And for anyone who has NOT read it... may I say that "Hard Landing" is one of the absolute most incredible books for anyone interested in the US airl
53 lrarjets : Thirty years is a long time, but here is how I remember that day. I was in my apartment in Denton, TX. Since it was raining the flight path for one of
54 Gr8SlvrFlt : I agree about "Hard Landing." I just finished it. Although it's over 15 years old, it's still relevant and quite an eye-opener.
55 Post contains links and images ouboy79 : Some what related...the original home of Braniff is getting some much needed love. It is now owned by SandRidge Energy and will retain its original fa
56 Post contains links 802flyguy : More about Mr Spencer: http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documen.../convicted-felon-behind-restaurant Even though it has been a long time, I remember a WS
57 skycub : I would like to quote a few pages from "Splash of Colors" by John J. Nance: "One of Braniff's ticket agents at Sea-Tac International Airport put the r
58 Post contains links and images 802flyguy : Update: one of the links has the following excerpt from the WSJ story: http://www.pe.com/local-news/local-n...ring-of-spencer-despite-record.ece "He w
59 Post contains images Viscount724 : Canadian cargo carrier Kelowna Flightcraft Air Charter's fleet includes 13 727-200 freighters, of which 6 were originally delivered to Braniff. They o
60 RWA380 : Would have traded my right nut to have been a passenger on that 747 HNL-DFW that last night. A day that took some bright colors out of our skies forev
61 ord : According to airline historian George Cearley's book "Braniff: 1965-1986," after the shutdown Braniff followed a series of procedures set by Boeing t
62 Post contains links ord : Check out industry analyst Michael Boyd's take today on Braniff's shutdown: http://aviationplanning.com/HotFlash.htm I know he worked for Braniff at t
63 Post contains links skycub : Indeed.... if you look at the original route maps for Braniff II, you can see that BN II's original plans originally centered around DFW: From March
64 type-rated : Could it be that CO inherited some BN 727's directly? I remember seeing a supplement to the CO F/A training manual that was labeled "Supplementary In
65 747buff : Those planes definitely would have come straight from BN. PE, due to their no-frills operation did not have ovens or even full sized galleys on their
66 deltacto : duplicate post deleted[Edited 2012-05-15 12:27:47]
67 type-rated : I never thought about that. In the supplemental sheet it had a photo of a CO oven with another photo of a BN oven right next to it. I did notice that
68 skycub : It looks like Continental acquired 19 ex-Braniff 727-227 (BN registrations N426BN through N445BN) as a result of the People Express acquisition in 198
69 jc2354 : Wasn't there a film crew crew following Putnam around for a planned documentary? For some reason, this seems to stick in my mind. Jack
70 WA707atMSP : The TV crew was from the PBS television series "Enterprise".
71 DTWPurserBoy : That is incorrect. The 747SP that was sold to Aerolineas had been flown by Braniff. They took delivery of three-N603BN, N604BN and (I think) N605BN.
72 milesrich : When Braniff I shut down, their tickets were honored by other carriers, on a space available basis. Everyone who went to Hawaii, got home on American
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