Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Do Other Airlines Look After Their Own?  
User currently offlinebaexecutive From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2005, 738 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 8539 times:

My friend who works with me at British Airways has recently become unwell downroute and the company have been absolutely fantastic, they have paid for flights & taxis to the hospital for her boyfriend and family...I just wanted to say a big thank you, I feel safe working for you....

....thank you British Airways

21 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25106 posts, RR: 22
Reply 1, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 8424 times:

Sometime in the late 1970s or so, a CP Air airport agent in YVR, a young guy in his 20s, was on vacation in the Caribbean (I think it was the Virgin Islands). He hit his head on a rock while diving and broke his neck and was in a coma. The local hospital couldn't do much except keep him stable. The CP president approved taking a 727 out of service. It flew the 4,000 miles or so from YVR (with a fuel stop) with a medical team and some of the employee's family aboard, and brought him home on a stretcher. Required cancelling several flights.

After a long stay in hospital he eventually recovered quite well but was a paraplegic and lost the use of his legs. CP found him a new job in the accounting department or similar administrative area that he was able to handle in his wheelchair.

CP never publicized the trip but word got out and I think there was an article in the Canadian edition of the Reader's Digest about the the rescue flight.


User currently offlinemayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10372 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 8357 times:

I'm sure most airlines have had incidents and stories like this, one time or another.


There used to be a guy with DL at ORD that fell from a ladder onto a metal fence post on the back of his head. He had brain damage, but DL kept him on to work in cabin service, doing odd jobs. Mostly he filled the bags of ice.



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offlineairtran737 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3704 posts, RR: 12
Reply 3, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 8183 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

A buddy of mine flies for Atlas and was in NBO when his mom suddenly passed away. He chose to operate the leg back up to Europe (he was the r/o and the other two pilots did all the work). Atlas got him a flight home about an hour after he landed and were able to get in contact with DL S.O.C. and they held the plane for him. When it comes down to it, the company will rise up in some of the worst circumstances and help you out.


Nice Trip Report!!! Great Pics, thanks for posting!!!! B747Forever
User currently offlinejetblueguy22 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 2781 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 8156 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

I heard a story about a DL pilot who was on a layover somewhere in Africa and swallowed a chicken bone. They brought him to the hospital but it only got worse (not sure if it was because of the hospital or him). DL sent a private jet out to fly him to London for treatment, flew his family out to be with him, and the chief pilot stopped by for a visit. He was out of service for a couple months. Quite a story if you ask me.
Blue



You push down on that yoke, the houses get bigger, you pull back on the yoke, the houses get bigger- Ken Foltz
User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 7972 times:

Just this year a ramp supervisor was involved in an incident at ATL. Wont go into details but he ended up loosing his leg a few days later by way of amputation. DL went ahead and paid for a top of the line wheelchair. They paid for a contractor to install ramps in his home and widen the doorways in his house and redid his bathroom so that it could accomodate him. This is all outside of insurance. This past week there was a golf tournament put together by ATL leadership to raise funds for him.


What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlinenzrich From New Zealand, joined Dec 2005, 1522 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 7682 times:

Air NZ cancelled a flight from LAX to AKL and passengered the plane and crew to AKL after the crew were involved in trying to save a suicide jumpers life that landed on their crew bus to the airport

L.A. Suicide Causes Air NZ Flight Cancellation (by TG992 Feb 25 2004 in Civil Aviation)



"Pride of the pacific"
User currently offlinestrangr From Australia, joined Apr 2012, 110 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days ago) and read 7538 times:

while we are on Air NZ.

I remember seeing this movie when I was a younger one.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_188_Pacific_rescue


User currently offlineNutsaboutplanes From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 496 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 5817 times:

Airlines do take care of their own....I have seen it in some way, shape or form at all of the major carriers where I have worked.

The response generally comes in two forms, the first coming from the company who arranges travel and accomodations for family....all pass travel rules and guidelines are tossed out the window and nothing is off the table. I have seen airlines pay for multiple hotel rooms, food and rental cars for families for an extended period of time while an employee is hospitalized.

The second response comes from the tight knit employee group in the form of vacation hour donations and charity fund raising in breakrooms with bake sales and similar grass roots efforts. It really is amazing to see how people come together to take care of a fellow employee and their family.

While the airline business is a tough business.....it is full of good people who will bend over backwards to help their co-workers and that is inclusive of the rank in file and the leadership.



American Airlines, US Airways, Alaska Airlines, Northwest Airlines, America West Airlines, USAFR
User currently offlineABQopsHP From United States of America, joined May 2006, 848 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 4602 times:

In 1989 UA had a few flights a day in and out of SUX, so when UA232 crashed, the agents there where overwhelmed by what had happened. HP who also served SUX at the time, had agents on duty, they took over the processing of the regular scheduled UA flights so the UA agents could continue to manage the accident for the next few days. There is an agreement with all the airlines and departments at airports, that in the event of any carrier having an incident, the other carriers will set up "Mutual aid" procedures to assist that carrier in crisis. Any time there is a tragedy in the airline industry, it affects all of us together. We all feel the pain, of a lost employee/crew and aircraft. There is a bond between us all.

JD CRP



A line is evidence that other people exist.
User currently offlineAirNovaBAe146 From Canada, joined Jun 2008, 362 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 4515 times:

On the flip side, I used to work for a large regional airline in the US.

In mid- 2001, the Captain who was No. 2 on the pilot seniority list had a form of cancer that he had been fighting for more than a year that took a turn for the worse.

There was a maximum contribution the company would make towards medical expenses, and as his cancer became more aggressive, this amount was reached and the company booted him off the medical plan.

The union took up a collection in the crew lounge. Many pilots including myself mailed a donation check to his spouse. The guy had been with our company since before its official founding (as he had worked for one of several companies that got mashed together to form this airline).

This individual ended up passing away a few months later. It certainly made the last few months of his life a lot more stressful than they had to be.

So to all those who want to say airlines automatically take care of their own - think twice.

AN


User currently offlinetymnbalewne From Bermuda, joined Mar 2005, 946 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 4387 times:

Quoting baexecutive (Thread starter):
My friend who works with me at British Airways has recently become unwell downroute and the company have been absolutely fantastic, they have paid for flights & taxis to the hospital for her boyfriend and family...I just wanted to say a big thank you, I feel safe working for you....

....thank you British Airways

I'm assuming your friend was working at the time of their illness? (i.e. not on hols). If so, any company worth their salt would provide assistance, and perhaps would be required to do so.

I will say that many years ago when I was at BA, one of my staff's sister was killed tragically in her, and her brother's home country (about 7000 miles away). All I was supposed to offer the staff member was the ability to buy a S/A ticket with a slightly higher boarding priority than the standard leisure travel ticket. I won't say what I did or how it was done but my staff member was able to travel on a positive space J class ticket on that night's flight to get him home ASAP.



Dewmanair...begins with Dew
User currently offlineFI642 From Monaco, joined Mar 2005, 1079 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3016 times:

I'm assuming your friend was working at the time of their illness? (i.e. not on hols). If so, any company worth their salt would provide assistance, and perhaps would be required to do so.

I will say that many years ago when I was at BA, one of my staff's sister was killed tragically in her, and her brother's home country (about 7000 miles away). All I was supposed to offer the staff member was the ability to buy a S/A ticket with a slightly higher boarding priority than the standard leisure travel ticket. I won't say what I did or how it was done but my staff member was able to travel on a positive space J class ticket on that night's flight to get him home ASA

Quoting tymnbalewne (Reply 11):

I'm assuming your friend was working at the time of their illness? (i.e. not on hols). If so, any company worth their salt would provide assistance, and perhaps would be required to do so.

I will say that many years ago when I was at BA, one of my staff's sister was killed tragically in her, and her brother's home country (about 7000 miles away). All I was supposed to offer the staff member was the ability to buy a S/A ticket with a slightly higher boarding priority than the standard leisure travel ticket. I won't say what I did or how it was done but my staff member was able to travel on a positive space J class ticket on that night's flight to get him home ASAP.

You always did right by me- and I didn't even work for BA!



737MAX, Cool Planes for the Worlds Coolest Airline.
User currently offlinecmf From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 2984 times:

Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 5):
Just this year a ramp supervisor was involved in an incident at ATL. Wont go into details but he ended up loosing his leg a few days later by way of amputation. DL went ahead and paid for a top of the line wheelchair. They paid for a contractor to install ramps in his home and widen the doorways in his house and redid his bathroom so that it could accomodate him. This is all outside of insurance. This past week there was a golf tournament put together by ATL leadership to raise funds for him.

I really think it is great they went out of their way and did all of this above what they were required to do but at the same time, it should be part of every medical insurance.


User currently onlineBreninTW From Taiwan, joined Jul 2006, 1625 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 2954 times:

In the early 90s a friend of mine completed cabin crew training at SA, but before she could do her first flight, she was diagnosed with cancer. She was immediately given six months' paid sick leave and offered an office position. The terms of the sick leave were such that all she had to do was appear at the office, even if she left immediately it wouldn't be counted as a day of sick leave.

The staff at SA were amazing in the way they looked after her for the duration of her illness until she, sadly, passed away.



I'm tired of the A vs. B sniping. Neither make planes that shed wings randomly!
User currently offlineKyrone From United States of America, joined Mar 2011, 126 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 2471 times:

I used to manage at a SAS station prior to the operation being outsourced. I had fallen ill and needed to take a month off to look after myself.

I was also a bit of a Halloween nut, and used to set up a large 'yard haunt' every year in my yard. That year I had taken ill was during the month of October, and was not going to be able to put up my set up myself.

One day, during my sick leave, a number of my staff showed up at my house, and set it all up for me. I was shocked and surprised by their kindness.

Then almost all the station staff showed up and threw me a surprise get well party. You could not have removed the smile from my face for any reason.

I was priviledged to manage such a fine group of people, and SAS was lucky to have such employees representing them.

To me, thats an airline taking care of its own.


User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4974 posts, RR: 19
Reply 16, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 2431 times:

If you notice a lot of these stories are from the past, sometimes many years past. That was when real people ran airlines, not the bean counters with calculators. Many types of companies have something they call "acceptable losses" and airlines are no different. If you come down with kind of illness that will boost their health insurance premiums you may become part of that.

Years ago companies and people in the airline industry used to feel like it was all family, but that went away with deregulation.
Now cash is king.



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlineRyanairGuru From Australia, joined Oct 2006, 5365 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2310 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 16):
If you notice a lot of these stories are from the past, sometimes many years past.

I can't speak for other airlines, but I can join baexecutive in saying that BA are fantastic (sometimes)

Last year my sister (FA) fell ill in SYD. They payed for her medical expenses, accommodation, and then flew her back to LHR in First once she was ok to travel. Yes she was at work when she this occurred, but...


Back in 2006 she had an accident downroute (ie at work). She was off work for 15 months as a result. BA could not have been more unhelpful and uncaring if they had tried. They stopped paying her once her sick leave and other leave entitlements had run out. She fought them through the courts and finally won and got them to reinstate her pay and back pay her for the intervening 6 months.



Worked Hard, Flew Right
User currently offlineBrouAviation From Netherlands, joined Jun 2009, 985 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2303 times:

Quoting jetblueguy22 (Reply 4):


I heard a story about a DL pilot who was on a layover somewhere in Africa and swallowed a chicken bone.

I do not want to take credit away from where it is due, but considering this man was well trained with the typerating and all, losing him because of eating a chicken bone would be a sad waste of resources, and could even bring DL in the position of being sued by the relatives of the pilot.

Not saying DL acted selfish here, but taking good care of your employees, especially those who cost a lot to replace, is in the interest of the airline itself as well.



Never ask somebody if he's a pilot. If he is, he will let you know soon enough!
User currently offlineAusA380 From Australia, joined Jan 2009, 310 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2219 times:

I worked at TAA (now QF Domestic) in MEL when my father was on holidays in the UK with my mother, fell ill, had a kidney removed and then had a heart attack. I was to go to the US a week later on holidays for a few weeks. My mum didn't want me to stop my holiday. Talked to my manager, and he indicated that it would be ok if I went to the UK (I had no leave left), so I changed my ticketed (ID25) and word was given to QF that I was going to LHR and the ensured that I had a seat all the way, and the old TWA gave me an FOC to STL (from LGW) for me to carry on my holidays which my parents really wanted me to do as there was not much else I could do in the UK. My boss indicated that if any one asked, I was on business in the UK office.

Because of the heart attack, my dad was not able to fly for 6 - 8 weeks, so the week I was in LHR I met up with the staff at the local office and started to organise Mum's accommodation and arrangements for the return. Their insurance company was fantastic (they were on a retirement F class round the world ticket - not an airline discount) and agreed to pay all costs for my parents to fly directly back to ADL when medically cleared F Class and gave mum advances for living expenses.

When dad was medically cleared, a cheque was couriered for QF for travel in the next couple of days (QF knew this would be happening), but then QF refused to issue the ticket as they wanted 4 days to clear the insurance company's check!

Naturally very unhappy with QF, told mum to go to our office, they put here in contact with South African airlines (who were the original ticketing airline as they had a SA/CP round the world ticket), who agreed that if the insurance company could get a new cheque made out to them, they would issue the tickets for travel on QF for the next day!

So great help from my old airline, QF getting to LHR, TWA getting me back to my holiday and SAA sorting out the mess that QF LHR created when they were fully in the loop for 7 weeks.


User currently offlineKyrone From United States of America, joined Mar 2011, 126 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 2038 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 16):
If you notice a lot of these stories are from the past, sometimes many years past.

Mine was about five years ago, but then again; a lot of change has happened in five years in this industry...and its not exactly reflecting well on a taking care of your employee means they will take can of your customer type of philosophy.


User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 21, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1952 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 16):

The Delta family "feeling" is still very much there. For myself and a lot of my co-workers. In additon to my story (this year) DL has always been known to "look out for their own". There are many resources available to all employees to help them out during times of need. Many of the programs are ran for the employees BY the employees. All have their own Board of Directors and all n the board are rank and file that run programs such as Delta's Scholarship Program, Employee and Retireee Care Fund,etc. etc.



What gets measured gets done.
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Do Major Airlines Own EX Jets For CEO/Presidents? posted Sat Jul 31 2010 18:58:54 by CLEpirate
Why Do No Other Airlines Advertise? posted Tue Oct 20 2009 15:58:11 by PWMRamper
Do Any Airlines Operate Their Own RJs? posted Mon Aug 4 2008 16:08:38 by Soxfan
UAL Pilot's Hat Logos / Other Airlines Do This? posted Thu Nov 30 2006 23:47:05 by DIA
What Do Airlines Look For In New Pilots? posted Fri Aug 4 2006 16:18:13 by BowflexBrennan
Do Any Airlines Own Catering Companies? posted Thu Mar 4 2004 04:44:33 by Cory6188
Any Other Airlines Out There Like Angola? posted Wed Mar 3 2004 00:14:15 by Windshear
Airlines That Own Other Airlines posted Mon Feb 18 2002 14:58:05 by Flyinghighboy
What Other Airlines Does DAL Do Mx For At The TOC posted Sat Aug 18 2001 11:01:14 by Srbmod
Do You Infants Should Have To Buy There Own Seats? posted Wed May 30 2001 04:19:47 by Boeing 747-311