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Canadian Pacific In The 1960s  
User currently offlineJackbr From Australia, joined Dec 2009, 666 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 4676 times:

I'm interested in Canadian Pacific Airlines in the 1960s

How "big" an airline was it, in terms of fleet, routes etc.

What sort of reputation did it have, in particular regards to service? How was it thought of compared to TCA/Air Canada?

I'd also be interested to hear any memories in general of Canadian Pacific in this era. Their livery at the time was spectacular, and I only recently found out they served SYD with DC-8s in the 1960s. I always thought they pulled out in the late 50s and didn't return until the "CPair" days in the early 70s

24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinebakersdozen From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 336 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 4670 times:

http://cpair.blogspot.ca/

Check out the links down the right side.


User currently offlinemultimark From Canada, joined Jul 2006, 796 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 4653 times:

CP Air had a better reputation for service than Air Canada.

User currently offlinegemuser From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 5664 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 4539 times:

Quoting Jackbr (Thread starter):

How "big" an airline was it, in terms of fleet, routes etc.

See:
12/1960 - http://www.timetableimages.com/ttimages/complete/cp60/cp60-05.jpg Once weekly YVR-HNL-NAN-AKL-SYD Bristol Britannia
4/1961 - http://www.timetableimages.com/ttimages/complete/cp61/cp61-6.jpg As above but with DC-8
4/1962 - http://www.timetableimages.com/ttimages/complete/cp62/cp62-5.jpg
4/1966 - http://www.timetableimages.com/ttimages/complete/cp66/

Brief summary: Services started by 8/1951 YVR-HNL-Canton Is-NAN-SYD with DC6. Connections to/from AKL at NAN.
Bristol Britannia by 1959 route YVR-HNL-NAN-AKL-SYD
DC-8 by 4/1961, route stayed the same until 8/1966 at least.
Purely from memory I think DC-10s replaced the DC-8s in the 1970, BUT not sure. It was well into the 70s if not 80s before the HNL swap out started between CP & QF & NZ

For non South Pacific services the URLs above provide a lot of information.

Gemuser



DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
User currently offlinekiwiandrew From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 8565 posts, RR: 13
Reply 4, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 4511 times:
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Quoting gemuser (Reply 3):
It was well into the 70s if not 80s before the HNL swap out started between CP & QF & NZ

In Sep 88 I flew on a CP DC-10 AKL-NAN-HNL and then swapped onto a HNL-YVR flight ( the one I had started on continued to YYZ instead). In May 91 I flew AKL-HNL on NZ metal with CP code before changing to a CP DC-10 for the HNL-YYZ leg. I am pretty sure that I was actually schedule changed by a day as originally it had been going to be CP metal the whole way, so I suspect it was sometime around Apr '91 that CP dropped AKL in favour of the codeshare.



Moderation in all things ... including moderation ;-)
User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 5, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 4471 times:

Quoting multimark (Reply 2):
CP Air had a better reputation for service than Air Canada.

Very well admired for in-flight service, but this is not surprising as CPA were essentially a niche airline that could not compete with AC on frequency and capacity (one could say they were not allowed to) so service was where it had to be.

In 1960 a transcontinental route was permitted (once daily) initially with Britannias but replaced by DC-8s once available. The frequency was doubled in I believe 1965 and ultimately all restrictions came off in 1969. They still lost money.

[Edited 2012-05-29 01:31:59]

[Edited 2012-05-29 01:32:43]


Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25345 posts, RR: 22
Reply 6, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 4139 times:

Quoting Jackbr (Thread starter):
What sort of reputation did it have, in particular regards to service? How was it thought of compared to TCA/Air Canada?

As mentioned, CP's inflight service was second-to-none. Y class meal service (on china and with real silverware) was better than what you now get in business class on most carriers. I can only think of a couple of airlines with service that matched CP in those days. As mentioned, that was the only way CP could compete due to all the restrictions they operated under that favoured then-government-owned AC.

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 5):
The frequency was doubled in I believe 1965 and ultimately all restrictions came off in 1969.

.

Not correct re the 1969 changes. In 1969 CP was permitted to increase transcon capacity to only 25% of the total market, and all flights still had to originate and terminate at YVR and YUL which was a major handicap to efficient scheduling. It was many more years before those restrictions were eliminated.


User currently offlinelonghauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 4990 posts, RR: 42
Reply 7, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 4116 times:

Canadian Pacific was always a "boutique" company. The airline was the best, the hotels were the best .... even their transcontinental train was better than the competition. Yes, Canadian Pacific Airlines, then CP Air were never profitable, but they were not really intended to be.

For one thing, the shackles placed on them by the government to favour Air Canada made it virtually impossible. But also, it was my opinion that CPAir was more of a "billboard" for CP Enterprises that spanned 5 continents. And CP Enterprises was and is very profitable.

The only airline that came close was Wardair. And, it was said that Wardair's in-flight service was modeled after CP.

Once restrictions on CP were removed, Air Canada improved its in-flight service as a necessity. Then when Wardair joined the mix in the mid 1980s, Canada was home to what was probably the finest in-flight service in the world!

Looking at what service is today, us "old-timers" can only sigh!



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25345 posts, RR: 22
Reply 8, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 4088 times:

Quoting longhauler (Reply 7):
And CP Enterprises was and is very profitable.

If you're referring to the parent company CP Limited, they no longer exist. All the non-rail subsidiary companies were sold or spun off some years ago, leaving only the Canadian Pacific Railway, and they just lost a major proxy fight that resulted in resignation of their CEO and many members of the board of directors. And their Canadian operations have been totally shut down for the past week due to a strike. I think their services within the U.S. are continuing.

[Edited 2012-05-29 17:06:43]

[Edited 2012-05-29 17:07:53]

User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25345 posts, RR: 22
Reply 9, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3964 times:

Quoting gemuser (Reply 3):
Brief summary: Services started by 8/1951 YVR-HNL-Canton Is-NAN-SYD with DC6.

You're not starting at the beginning. CP began service to SYD in July 1949 with the Canadair C-4, operating YVR-SFO-HNL-Canton Island-NAN-SYD. SFO was only a fuel stop which was dropped with the DC-6B replaced the Canadair C-4 a couple of years later. The South Pacific route was CP's first international route, followed shortly after by YVR-TYO-HKG, also initially using the Canadair C-4.


User currently offlineAY104 From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 505 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3798 times:

Here is a link to Timetableimages.com, where you will find three complete Canadian Pacific timetables from the 60s: April 1961, 1962 and 1966:

http://www.timetableimages.com/ttimages/complete/complete.htm#NAm

I can't really say much more about Canadian Pacific than what has already been said. Their service was outstanding. If anyone in our family travelled by air, it was Canadian Pacific whenever possible. I mostly flew on their DC8s, but one flight on the Britannia in 1962, YVR-AMS via YYC and YEG, and a stop in Sondrestrom, Greenland for fuel. The way back from AMS was nonstop on the DC8. Even economy class was luxurious, and as one member pointed out, better meals than some airlines serve nowadays in Business or First.
In all honesty, I can't say that Air Canada's service in the 60s was bad. Especially by today's standards. It's just that CP's was quite a step above. I used to love flying on the Viscounts most of all.
Their logo with the Canada Goose, and that great font, was the best!
I even flew them to SFO and back in the late 60s, on a DC8, with full meal service of course.

Cheers,
Carl



The only thing a customer should expect for his/her loyalty is good service
User currently offlinegemuser From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 5664 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 3749 times:

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 9):
You're not starting at the beginning.

I bow to the Master! (No smiley, I mean it! When it comes to CP Air)

I wrote only what timetable images had for full CP timetables.

Gemuser



DC23468910;B72172273373G73873H74374475275376377L77W;A319 320321332333343;BAe146;C402;DHC6;F27;L188;MD80MD85
User currently offlineJackbr From Australia, joined Dec 2009, 666 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3696 times:

How many DC-8-51s did they originally have? I know they had the first DC-8 built. Were they used on specific routes, or interchangeably with the -43s?

User currently offlineghYHZ From Canada, joined Feb 2008, 260 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 3624 times:

Canadian Pacific Airlines was part of “Canadian Pacific – The World’s Most Complete Transportation System” Planes, Trains, Ships, Hotels, Trucks, Express, Telecommunications.

Trans Atlantic and Trans Pacific Ocean Lines…..Scenic Dome Stainless Steel Transcontinental Passenger Trains……famous Rocky Mountain hotels such as Banff Springs and Chateau Lake Louise.

Canadian Pacific Airlines was acquired by Pacific Western and became Canadi>n which was then eventually acquired by Air Canada.

http://discuss.amtraktrains.com/inde...transportation-system-with-photos/


User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 14, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3594 times:

Quoting Jackbr (Reply 12):
How many DC-8-51s did they originally have? I know they had the first DC-8 built. Were they used on specific routes, or interchangeably with the -43s?

None. They started with 5 -43s (RR Conway engines), then added 1 -53, 1 -55, and ultimately 5 -63s (all P&W JT3Ds of different power levels).

The -63s were I believe mostly used on Asian services, at least initially.



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineDavidByrne From New Zealand, joined Sep 2007, 1650 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 3508 times:

Quoting gemuser (Reply 3):
Brief summary: Services started by 8/1951 YVR-HNL-Canton Is-NAN-SYD with DC6. Connections to/from AKL at NAN.
Bristol Britannia by 1959 route YVR-HNL-NAN-AKL-SYD
DC-8 by 4/1961, route stayed the same until 8/1966 at least.
Purely from memory I think DC-10s replaced the DC-8s in the 1970, BUT not sure. It was well into the 70s if not 80s before the HNL swap out started between CP & QF & NZ

Canadian Pacific was one of only a handful of international carriers to serve NZ in the late 1950s - the others being Pan Am, TAI/UTA and Qantas - can't think of any others. Not actually sure when TAI/UTA started. BOAC didn't start with its Comet service until about 1963. It wasn't until Mangere Airport was opened in 1965, capable of taking 707s and DC8s, that other overseas carriers slowly began serving AKL - I think SQ would have been next.

Canadian Pacific did convert its AKL service from the Britannia to DC8s in 1965, but I recall that there was a political complication (as was not uncommon in those days) whereby CP had to cease operations because NZ (then designated TE) had no interest in serving Canada. A different political wrinkle had penalised TE/NZ in the early 1960s when the French government withdrew traffic rights in French Polynesia to TE/NZ when it was flying DC6s to on the Coral Route to PPT, IIRC.

Also, my recollection of the Canadian Pacific service to the South Pacific was that it was fortnightly YVR-HNL-NAN-AKL and fortnightly YVR-HNL-NAN-SYD - at least during the time of the Britannias. I thought that the Britannias also had a tech stop at Canton Island between NAN and HNL - and that this was cut out only when the DC8s took over, though I'm willing to be persuaded otherwise.

In Europe, CP served ports like AMS and ROM in the 1960s, as TCA/Air Canada had the rights to the larger markets, including the UK. They also had services on the North Pacific (TYO and HKG at least), and into Latin America - to MEX at least but also beyond there, I think.



This is not my beautiful house . . . This is not my beautiful wife
User currently offlineconnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 16, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3397 times:

Quoting DavidByrne (Reply 15):
Also, my recollection of the Canadian Pacific service to the South Pacific was that it was fortnightly YVR-HNL-NAN-AKL and fortnightly YVR-HNL-NAN-SYD - at least during the time of the Britannias. I thought that the Britannias also had a tech stop at Canton Island between NAN and HNL - and that this was cut out only when the DC8s took over, though I'm willing to be persuaded otherwise.

I believe that is correct, insofar as the Britannia era is concerned.

Quoting DavidByrne (Reply 15):
In Europe, CP served ports like AMS and ROM in the 1960s, as TCA/Air Canada had the rights to the larger markets, including the UK. They also had services on the North Pacific (TYO and HKG at least), and into Latin America - to MEX at least but also beyond there, I think.

CPA were also serving LIS & MAD as well. Might also have included TER. Added ATH for a while late 60s/early 70s.



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlinesteelhead From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 132 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3359 times:

There is a real fine book available:

WINGWALKERS - The Rise and Fall of Canada's Other Airline

by Peter Pigott

You will find a detailed history of CP Air (and all the airlines connected with CP Air) from the beginning to the end.

Harbour Publishing

www.harbourpublishing.com


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25345 posts, RR: 22
Reply 18, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 3166 times:

Quoting DavidByrne (Reply 15):
I thought that the Britannias also had a tech stop at Canton Island between NAN and HNL - and that this was cut out only when the DC8s took over, though I'm willing to be persuaded otherwise.
Quoting connies4ever (Reply 16):
Quoting DavidByrne (Reply 15):
Also, my recollection of the Canadian Pacific service to the South Pacific was that it was fortnightly YVR-HNL-NAN-AKL and fortnightly YVR-HNL-NAN-SYD - at least during the time of the Britannias. I thought that the Britannias also had a tech stop at Canton Island between NAN and HNL - and that this was cut out only when the DC8s took over, though I'm willing to be persuaded otherwise.

I believe that is correct, insofar as the Britannia era is concerned.

Don't believe Canton Island was used very often by the time the Britannia was in service. Possibly on rare occasions when winds were adverse. Even with the DC-6B I believe HNL-NAN was operated nonstop most of the time.

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 16):
CPA were also serving LIS & MAD as well. Might also have included TER.

The stop in the Azores was SMA (Santa Maria) not TER. There was a lot of emigrant traffic from the Azores to Canada during that period.

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 16):
Added ATH for a while late 60s/early 70s.
TLV was also added for a few years in the mid-70s but it proved unprofitable and was dropped. I remember one CP DC-8-63 flight from TLV with stops at MXP and ATH soon after service started. It was in mid-winter and by the time the flight reached TLV there were fewer than 50 passengers on the DC-8-63 which had around 200 seats (12 F and 191 Y if memory correct). CP had no 5th freedom rights beyond MXP so the flight got emptier after each stop. MXP was also fogged in so the flight diverted to GOA (Genoa) which was a frequent occurrence at notoriously foggy MXP in the winter in those days.

On the return trip from ATH about a week later (I'd flown TWA TLV-ATH as wanted to spend a couple of days in ATH), MXP was again fogged in and we again diverted to GOA after holding over MXP for over an hour hoping for a break in the weather. Unfortunately the crew ran out of time and all the passengers, including MXP-boarding passengers who were were bused from MXP to GOA, were put up in a very nice hotel in Genoa for the night and we continued the next morning nonstop GOA-
Quoting DavidByrne (Reply 15):
and into Latin America - to MEX at least but also beyond there, I think.
LIM, SCL and EZE all started in the mid-50s as a continuation of YVR-MEX. LIM began first and was extended to SCL and EZE a year or so later. Some flights also stopped in YYC between YVR and MEX. YUL-MEX flights connected with the YVR flight at MEX for passengers continuing to South America. For a while, there was also a stop at Windsor (YYZ and MEX, no doubt the only longhaul scheduled international service Windsor has ever had (or will ever have). For several years CP was the only carrier with nonstop service MEX-LIM. They had 5th freedom rights on the MEX-South America sectors and on SCL-EZE but not on LIM-SCL or LIM-EZE.

Sometime in the 1970s, scheduled service was added to ACA/GDL/PVR in addition to MEX. ACA then became a regular stop on the South America flights as, being at sea level, it permitted heavier loads to be carried than from MEX's 7,300 ft. elevation..

In later years, sometime in the mid-80s, the MEX stop was dropped from the YVR-South America route and it then became YVR-LIM-SCL-EZE, by then using the DC-10-30. Another DC-10 operated LIM and connected with the YVR flight for passengers to SCL and EZE. The LIM DC-10 then sat in LIM all day until the EZE-YVR flight arrived on the northbound flight late that night. Not long after that, CP's Latin America hub was moved from YVR to YVR lost it's only direct service to South Ameica which had operated for over 30 years. From that point on, the only direct YVR-MEX service for many years was JAL's 5th freedom service NRT-YVR-MEX about twice a week. CP of course had extensive charter services from major cities in Canada to many resort destinations in Mexico during the winter months, mostly using 737-200s.

Quoting connies4ever (Reply 14):
Quoting Jackbr (Reply 12):
How many DC-8-51s did they originally have? I know they had the first DC-8 built. Were they used on specific routes, or interchangeably with the -43s?

None. They started with 5 -43s (RR Conway engines), then added 1 -53, 1 -55, and ultimately 5 -63s (all P&W JT3Ds of different power levels).

Make that 6-43s. Unfortunately, the last one, CF-CPK (tail #606) crashed at HND on March 4, 1966 killing 64 of the 72 aboard (arriving from HKG in poor weather). The aircraft was only 5 months old. The next day, a BOAC 707-436 departing HND for HKG disintegrated in severe turbulence over Mount Fuji a few minutes after takeoff, killing all 124 aboard. There's a news photo of the BA 707 taxiing for takeoff past the CP DC-8 wreckage from the day before.

In addition to the 1 -53 and 1-55F combi, CP also leased the very first DC-8 built (by then converted to a -51...used by Douglas to certificate the -50 series) for a year from October 1966 to October 1967. It was registered CF-CPN during that lease and named "Empress of Santiago". After CP it went to Delta who kept it for about 10 years. At DL it reverted to its original N8008D Douglas registration that it wore the day it made the first flight on May 30, 1958. It ended it's flying days with Aeromexico, then spent many years in the desert before it was unfortunately scrapped.

Photo of that aircraft making the first flight from LGB (with the original turbojet JT3C water-injected engines) in this 2008 Boeing article on the 50th anniversary.
http://www.boeing.com/news/frontiers/archive/2008/june/i_history.pdf

[Edited 2012-05-30 18:59:46]

User currently offlineJackbr From Australia, joined Dec 2009, 666 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 3069 times:

Maybe I'm crazy, but I recall reading that Canadian Pacific DC-8's had Y-Class seats in the forward section of their DC-8-40s/50s, and no lounge

Is this true? Or, was it only the case later on in the "CP Air" days?


User currently offlinelonghauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 4990 posts, RR: 42
Reply 20, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2826 times:

Quoting Jackbr (Reply 19):
Maybe I'm crazy, but I recall reading that Canadian Pacific DC-8's had Y-Class seats in the forward section of their DC-8-40s/50s, and no lounge

I can't believe Viscount724 has not answered this question!!! He knows everything about CP's DC-8s. (I can answer any question about TCA/AC's DC-8s, right down to fabric colours, but at a loss with CP)

I can answer a few questions though, perhaps he can fill in the gaps. I have two CP DC-8 brochures. One from the early 1960s with the introduction of the DC-8, and it shows a "normal" lounge set up between the forward galley/lavs and the cockpit. And another DC-8 brochure from the late 1960s with the introduction of the DC-8-63 "Spacemaster". It shows four first class seats (two pairs) on the right side, and a closet on the left side in the same space.

Now this could just be artistic licence, and I can offer no proof, as I have never been on a CP DC-8. However, in the early days of Canadi>n, I did fly with a lot of ex CP Captains that said that space on the DC-8-63 was used as a crew rest area, as noted, CP did use the DC-8-63 on some very long flights.



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25345 posts, RR: 22
Reply 21, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2816 times:

Quoting Jackbr (Reply 19):
Maybe I'm crazy, but I recall reading that Canadian Pacific DC-8's had Y-Class seats in the forward section of their DC-8-40s/50s, and no lounge

Is this true? Or, was it only the case later on in the "CP Air" days?

Correct. The F class lounge didn't last very long. They replaced the 5 lounge seats with 6 Y class seats which were normally only assigned when loads exceeded the main Y cabin. Not sure when they made that change but the lounge was definitely gone from all CP DC-8s by the time I joined CP in 1969. In dozens of CP DC-8 flights I only recall being seated in those seats once on a YYZ-YVR flight, and if not mistaken all passengers in those 6 seats were also non-rev. 90% of the time those seats were empty on scheduled flights, but CP also had an extensive charter program to Europe, mainly the UK, and those 6 seats came in handy on those flights which usually operated all-Y at high load factors.


User currently offlineJackbr From Australia, joined Dec 2009, 666 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2815 times:

Sounds like they had the lounge at least in the 1960s - perhaps I'm just wrong!

Would anyone know more about the "Ship One" DC-8 at CP? Was it given a standard Canadian Pacific DC-8 configuration with the same seats etc, or was it a "bit different?"


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25345 posts, RR: 22
Reply 23, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2786 times:

Quoting Jackbr (Reply 22):
Sounds like they had the lounge at least in the 1960s - perhaps I'm just wrong!

Would anyone know more about the "Ship One" DC-8 at CP? Was it given a standard Canadian Pacific DC-8 configuration with the same seats etc, or was it a "bit different?"

In those days, all the early DC-8s had the original Douglas "Palomar" seats, so it wouldn't have been very difficult to align the configuration with the rest of the fleet.

There were some equipment differences externally that made that "prototype" DC-8 a bit of an oddball, the most notable being the flat-bottomed engine pylons that dated from the original DC-8-10 through -40 series. When they converted it to a -51 they didn't replace the pylons with the new pylon design intended for the JT-3D turbofans which had vane-type thrust reversers on the -50 series and -61..

You can see the difference in the pylons on "Ship One" below, compared to the standard -50 (and -61) series production pylons which slope in a straight line upwards from the rear of the engine to the wing.


View Large View Medium
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Photo © Ellis M. Chernoff
View Large View Medium
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Photo © Aris Pappas



User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25345 posts, RR: 22
Reply 24, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2766 times:

For some reason, my Reply 18 has become corrupted and numbeous references to "YYZ" disappeared so it doesn't make sense. Correcting those references below to they way they appeared originally.

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 18):
I remember one CP DC-8-63 flight from TLV with stops at MXP and ATH

Should read "...from YYZ to TLV".

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 18):
and we continued the next morning nonstop GOA-

Should read "...nonstop GOA-YYZ."

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 18):
YUL-MEX flights connected with the YVR flight at MEX for passengers continuing to South America.

Should read "YUL-YYZ-MEX flights..."

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 18):
For a while, there was also a stop at Windsor (YYZ and MEX

Should read "...a stop at Windsor between YYZ and MEX"

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 18):
Another DC-10 operated LIM and connected with the YVR flight for passengers to SCL and EZE. The LIM DC-10 then sat in LIM all day until the EZE-YVR flight arrived on the northbound flight late that night.

Should read "Another DC-10 operated YYZ-LIM..."
and
"The YYZ-LIM DC-10 then sat in LIM all day..."

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 18):
Not long after that, CP's Latin America hub was moved from YVR to YVR lost it's only direct service to South Ameica

Should read "...CP's Latin America hub was moved from YVR to YYZ and YVR lost...etc."


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