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Did Pan Am's 707's Have Mood Lighting?  
User currently offlineT8KE0FF From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 410 posts, RR: 1
Posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 8854 times:

I was browsing around YouTube when I came across this video. At 8:11 it mentions "The mood enhanced by lighting; that can be changed from the pale pink of dawn, through all the variations to the dark blue at night". Does this mean that the natural colour/light from the sky outside floods in through the windows, or did they have mood lighting lighting similar to that on some aircraft today?

Thanks!

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uvkxa1O7Mec

[Edited 2012-06-30 13:25:53]


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16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAirCanada787 From Canada, joined Nov 2010, 281 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 8534 times:

Quoting T8KE0FF (Thread starter):
did they have mood lighting lighting similar to that on some aircraft today?

Modern mood lighting uses LEDs which were only invented in 1962 and were originally very very expensive. I also just noticed that the video has a date of 1958 which pre-dates the invention of LEDs all together. I would assume then that maybe they had a system of various coloured light bulbs and would turn on specific sets of lights to set the 'mood'. So the light wouldn't have probably changed gradually as they do now with LEDs.


I of course could be completely wrong. Hopefully someone has more information, the idea that they had mood lighting back then is interesting.

Thanks for posting the video!

[Edited 2012-06-30 15:17:12]


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User currently offlinenorthstardc4m From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2994 posts, RR: 37
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 8342 times:
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Considering it is basically a Pan Am propaganda piece, it could mean something as simple as dimmer switch controlled cabin lights, or just shutting them off in sets?


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User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24917 posts, RR: 22
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 8315 times:

Quoting northstardc4m (Reply 4):
Considering it is basically a Pan Am propaganda piece, it could mean something as simple as dimmer switch controlled cabin lights, or just shutting them off in sets?

As I recall, it was just different colored fluorescent tubes in the overhead lighting panels. When they dimmed the main cabin lights at night, the overhead lights could be changed from the usual white to a much lower-intensity blue or pink (forget which). Probably 2 sets of tubes in the lighting fixtures.

I'm sure it wasn't only Pan Am.


User currently online1337Delta764 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6447 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 8294 times:

Quoting AirCanada787 (Reply 3):
Modern mood lighting uses LEDs which were only invented in 1962 and were originally very very expensive. I also just noticed that the video has a date of 1958 which pre-dates the invention of LEDs all together. I would assume then that maybe they had a system of various coloured light bulbs and would turn on specific sets of lights to set the 'mood'. So the light wouldn't have probably changed gradually as they do now with LEDs.

Plus, initially in 1962, red was the only color of LED available. Sometime in the 1970s, amber and green LEDs became available, although the green was more of a yellowish-green instead of the pure green that is required for RGB LED displays. Pure green LEDs didn't come until the 1990s, alongside blue and white LEDs. More recently pink and purple LEDs have been introduced, although there are known issues with many of them fading to blue or white.



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User currently offlineghifty From United States of America, joined Jul 2010, 891 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 month 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 8142 times:

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 5):
As I recall, it was just different colored fluorescent tubes in the overhead lighting panels. When they dimmed the main cabin lights at night, the overhead lights could be changed from the usual white to a much lower-intensity blue or pink (forget which). Probably 2 sets of tubes in the lighting fixtures.

I'm sure it wasn't only Pan Am.

So then how could it be gradual? I think the video just refers to the change in lighting outside..



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User currently offlinecliffak From Sweden, joined Aug 2011, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 7045 times:

Quoting 1337Delta764 (Reply 6):
Plus, initially in 1962, red was the only color of LED available. Sometime in the 1970s, amber and green LEDs became available, although the green was more of a yellowish-green instead of the pure green that is required for RGB LED displays. Pure green LEDs didn't come until the 1990s, alongside blue and white LEDs. More recently pink and purple LEDs have been introduced, although there are known issues with many of them fading to blue or white.

The blue/white/pure green galluim nitride based LEDs we take for granted today were introduced commercially some time after 2000 (at least I don't remember seeing them in the late 1990s, and if available they were very expensive). Before GaN, the only blue LEDs available were based on silicon carbide (SiC), had comparatively poor performance and were barely bright enough for use as indicators. While there were RGB LEDs based on SiC blue and the "old" type green they would have been little more than expensive toys because of brightness and color purity issues.

To put this in perspective, RGB LED strips of the type suitable for mood lighting run about $30/5 m these days. The prices have certainly dropped..


User currently onlinePA110 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1995 posts, RR: 23
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6327 times:
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Having traveled extensively on Pan Am 707s, I can assure you there was no mood lighting such as we know it now. Unlike the propeller era, 707s was one of the earliest aircraft to introduce zoned lighting (sidewall lighting vs ceiling lighting). Most likely, this is pure 1960s marketing spin.


It's been swell, but the swelling has gone down.
User currently offlinepoLOT From United States of America, joined Jul 2011, 2130 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6207 times:

Quoting ghifty (Reply 7):
So then how could it be gradual? I think the video just refers to the change in lighting outside..

It's a marketing film, it is going to embellish. You will also find many talking about how whisper quiet the 707 and 727 are.


User currently offlineT8KE0FF From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2009, 410 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 5976 times:

Quoting PA110 (Reply 9):
Having traveled extensively on Pan Am 707s, I can assure you there was no mood lighting such as we know it now. Unlike the propeller era, 707s was one of the earliest aircraft to introduce zoned lighting (sidewall lighting vs ceiling lighting). Most likely, this is pure 1960s marketing spin.

Just what I was looking for, thank you very much!

Quoting poLOT (Reply 10):
It's a marketing film, it is going to embellish. You will also find many talking about how whisper quiet the 707 and 727 are.

I didn't think that claim was true either.   



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User currently offlineClassicLover From Ireland, joined Mar 2004, 4627 posts, RR: 23
Reply 10, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 5531 times:

Quoting T8KE0FF (Thread starter):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uvkxa1O7Mec

Great video - I love how they point out that they don't have to have any warm up of the engines before takeoff! lol!

I always thought the 707 looked great in Pan Am livery too!



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User currently offlineSK A340 From Sweden, joined Mar 2000, 845 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 5288 times:

Off topic, but great video!  

User currently offlineWarmNuts From United States of America, joined May 2006, 94 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4514 times:

Quoting T8KE0FF (Thread starter):
"The mood enhanced by lighting; that can be changed from the pale pink of dawn, through all the variations to the dark blue at night"

To adjust your mood lighting (in 1958), open window shade and rotate planet clockwise.  


User currently offlineFI642 From Monaco, joined Mar 2005, 1079 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4490 times:

They did not. I worked these birds second-hand, and can tell you they did not! Fun plane to work, but those engines were so noisy!


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User currently offlineDC8FriendShip From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 242 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4362 times:

Quoting poLOT (Reply 10):
It's a marketing film, it is going to embellish. You will also find many talking about how whisper quiet the 707 and 727 are

They were qiuet in the cabin compared to a turboprop. They didn't consider outside noise at that time.



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User currently offlineExL10Mktg From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 64 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 1 month 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2962 times:

[

Quoting PA110 (Reply 7):
Having traveled extensively on Pan Am 707s, I can assure you there was no mood lighting such as we know it now. Unlike the propeller era, 707s was one of the earliest aircraft to introduce zoned lighting (sidewall lighting vs ceiling lighting). Most likely, this is pure 1960s marketing spin.

I don't think it's pure marketing spin. The normal cabin lighting before and during the meal service on an overnight flight was the traditional white fluorescent sidewall and ceiling lighting. Afterwards the lights were switched off essentially and the oval ceiling cutouts had blue fluorescent lights lit invisibly from the side and the center of the oval had backlit pinholes creating the illusion that we had a couple of giant oval windows looking up into the star-filled night sky. It was very cool for 1958 and actually is not bad even by today's standards.



Quoting DC8FriendShip (Reply 14):

Quoting poLOT (Reply 10):
It's a marketing film, it is going to embellish. You will also find many talking about how whisper quiet the 707 and 727 are

They were qiuet in the cabin compared to a turboprop. They didn't consider outside noise at that time.

Forget the turboprops! Unless you happened to catch a BOAC Britania across the Atlantic, the immediate predecessor to the 707 was the DC-6/7 or the Super Constellation and I can assure you the difference in noise and especially vibration was nothing short of revolutionary. I remember having to shout and use hand signals from the window seat on a Connie to communicate with the stewardess (that is what they were called then!) Check out this clip and turn your speakers ALL the way up and you will have SOME idea of the noise factor (and remember you're only hearing two of the four engines and none of the vibration which you could both hear and feel.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3AI3ulifLY

And compared with the 707, the 727 was in fact exceptionally quiet ahead of the wing, identical to an MD-80 of today.


User currently offlinehiflyer From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2167 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (2 years 1 month 10 hours ago) and read 2390 times:

Quoting ExL10Mktg (Reply 15):
the oval ceiling cutouts had blue fluorescent lights lit invisibly from the side and the center of the oval had backlit pinholes creating the illusion that we had a couple of giant oval windows looking up into the star-filled night sky.

I remember those!!! First PA707 was 1960 to CPH...came back from OSL and that may have been the DC8...remember the lights at the side of the seat headrest on that one...and the bigger windows!! (heck..windows a must for a 8yr old!!..then again still is now...grin)


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