Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Debris From B787 Engine Sparks Fire In S.C.  
User currently offlinevarigb707 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 45078 times:

Interesting Story. Good thing nobody's hurt though.
"
Associated Press – 2 hrs 0 mins ago

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Federal officials are trying to determine why debris fell from the engine of a new Boeing 787 Dreamliner, starting a fire and forcing officials to shut down a South Carolina airport.
The Post and Courier of Charleston reports (http://bit.ly/NBRR0V) that debris from the aircraft fell onto the runway at Charleston International Airport and into the grass Saturday, sparking a blaze that closed the airport for more than an hour.
Boeing spokeswoman Candy Eslinger says the aircraft was undergoing preflight runway testing in North Charleston when the incident occurred. Eslinger says the 787 was the latest one built at the Boeing campus in North Charleston.
No one was injured in the incident, and Eslinger says production will not be affected.
The airport was closed for more than an hour. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating."


http://news.yahoo.com/debris-boeing-...gine-sparks-fire-sc-161445326.html

135 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6722 posts, RR: 12
Reply 1, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 44868 times:

I wonder if it's really engine parts or more likely FOD ?


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlinetrex8 From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 4786 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 44758 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Anyone know if it had GE or RR engines??

never mind, GE per thread in tech section

[Edited 2012-07-29 12:07:17]

User currently offlinetraindoc From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 361 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 44511 times:

Great place to have this happen. No passengers and before delivery. Hopefully just a one off event and not a "Rolls Royce" type problem for GE and its 787 engines.

User currently offlinetopgunswa From United States of America, joined Nov 2010, 1 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 40457 times:

It was a GE engine that failed, it closed the airport for at least 1hr 20mins and caused a grass fire. The long runway ( 15/33) was closed last month for a 12 month reconstruction. There was debris from the engine failure on the runway and associated areas. From what I was told there was no communication with the Tower about the failure at the time.

User currently offlinelightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13248 posts, RR: 100
Reply 5, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 39102 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Aesma (Reply 1):
I wonder if it's really engine parts or more likely FOD ?

I HIGHLY suspect FOD.

I see a new training video.   (I just had to, for the 2nd time this year, take FOE/FOD training... ugh.)

Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlinespiritair97 From United States of America, joined Jan 2011, 1231 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 38060 times:

I was at CHS last week and saw 4 Dreamliners. Three were in full AI colors and one had the red tail. I assume the red tailed one was the latest build, which is the one in question.

User currently offlinemop357 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 85 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 36885 times:

Quoting lightsaber (Reply 6):
Quoting Aesma (Reply 1):
I wonder if it's really engine parts or more likely FOD ?

I HIGHLY suspect FOD.

What is FOD?


User currently offlineKPDX From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 2770 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 36838 times:

Quoting mop357 (Reply 8):
What is FOD?

Foreign object debris.

 



View my aviation videos on Youtube by searching for zildjiandrummr12
User currently offlinelightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13248 posts, RR: 100
Reply 9, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 36092 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

It was an AI airframe:

"The jet involved in the episode is due to go to Air India and is the first "significant issue" with GE's new GEnx engine, Kennedy said. About 100 of the units are in service and are performing well, he said."

100 in service? That must be discussing all 788 engine.


Anyone else wonder if this will delay the AI deliveries further?   

Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlinenra-3b From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 167 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 35989 times:

Quoting lightsaber (Reply 6):
I HIGHLY suspect FOD.

I agree completely. With all the work going on over on the other runway, this is a distinct possibilty.

I once witnessed a C-5A outboard engine eat a drag chute. Very entertaining----- lots of flaming pieces of nylon and other crap spewing out of the exhaust pipe as well as the fan bypass duct.....   

Cheers,
Bob


User currently offlineaztrainer From United States of America, joined Oct 2011, 590 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 35494 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 1):
I wonder if it's really engine parts or more likely FOD ?
Quoting topgunswa (Reply 4):
From what I was told there was no communication with the Tower about the failure at the time.

If it was FOD, could this be why the pilots did not communicate the tower as it was not displayed on their instruments? I would think an unconstrained engine failure would have made a bigger headline.

How often do they check for FOD on the runway?


User currently offlineAngMoh From Singapore, joined Nov 2011, 492 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 35061 times:

Quoting lightsaber (Reply 10):
100 in service? That must be discussing all 788 engine.

747-8/8i has GEnx too, and that one is in service...


User currently offlinetrex8 From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 4786 posts, RR: 14
Reply 13, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 35026 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting AngMoh (Reply 13):
Quoting lightsaber (Reply 10):
100 in service? That must be discussing all 788 engine.

747-8/8i has GEnx too, and that one is in service...

and they got 4 on each of those!


User currently offlinelightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13248 posts, RR: 100
Reply 14, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 33899 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting KPDX (Reply 9):
Quoting mop357 (Reply 8):
What is FOD?

Foreign object debris.

  
It is taught as Foreign Object Elimination (FOE) and FOD. But FOD also means Foreign Object Damage.

Alas, improper FOE has led for FOD (as in damage).  
Quoting aztrainer (Reply 12):
How often do they check for FOD on the runway?

FOD is usually swept up on a schedule that is airport dependent (usually with a vacuum version of the street sweeper). The most damaging potential is something light enough to be pulled up by a minor vacuum (suction by the engines) but hard enough to damage engine blades.

Ground runs are not known for triggering true faults in an engine with the time on it of the GEnX. In other words, sometimes there have been prototype failures, but with the thousands of hours we have on the GEnX, this is most likely FOD.

Now FOD can be a liquid spilled into an engine that did damage while the plane sat. (Note: I do not know the history of this specific engine, so I'm speculating.) It could been a bolt. Maybe somebody sat in the engine and left a beer or two in there... (very unlikely... I'm stretching and I'll admit it.) But I would be willing to bet a beer this was FOD.   

Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlinemaxpower1954 From United States of America, joined Sep 2008, 1106 posts, RR: 7
Reply 15, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 33064 times:

What I want to know is, when did a factory or assembly plant become a "campus".

User currently offlinesoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32695 times:

Quoting maxpower1954 (Reply 16):
What I want to know is, when did a factory or assembly plant become a "campus".

Probably the same time buying all your insurance needs is now called "Bundling"...I hate "Buzz words"


User currently offlineAirIndia From United Arab Emirates, joined Jan 2001, 1644 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 32596 times:

Quoting lightsaber (Reply 10):
Anyone else wonder if this will delay the AI deliveries further?

If it does, that might be a blessing in disguise for AI.....


User currently offline747classic From Netherlands, joined Aug 2009, 2176 posts, RR: 14
Reply 18, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 30917 times:

According the latest tweet from Jon Ostrower (a mostly reliable source, former flightblogger) : "No sign of damage to GEnx front fan, ingested FOD ruled out, focus on engine's turbine sections"

See : https://twitter.com/jonostrower



Operating a twin over the ocean, you're always one engine failure from a total emergency.
User currently offlineBoeingVista From Australia, joined Jan 2009, 1581 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 30400 times:

Quoting 747classic (Reply 19):
"No sign of damage to GEnx front fan, ingested FOD ruled out, focus on engine's turbine sections"

Seriously doubt its FOD, I think its funny that A.net has narrowed a GE failure it down to FOD with absolutely no evidence whatsoever, if this was an RR engine, well just check a couple of threads over the last week or so..



BV
User currently offlinespink From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 318 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 29764 times:

Quoting BoeingVista (Reply 20):
Seriously doubt its FOD, I think its funny that A.net has narrowed a GE failure it down to FOD with absolutely no evidence whatsoever, if this was an RR engine, well just check a couple of threads over the last week or so..

Come on, we all know you have to have an engine explode in mid air before you get thrown into the doom and gloom doghouse for a couple years. This is just a ground explosion so it is just double secret probation.


User currently offlinesweair From Sweden, joined Nov 2011, 1827 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 28670 times:

That engine has flown quite a bit on the 748 and 787 and any issue should have been found IMO. Maybe it is a manufacture fault? A loose blade somewhere missed in testing and inspection? It shouldn't happen though..

Maybe a tool or a part left from pre flight maintenance?


User currently offline747classic From Netherlands, joined Aug 2009, 2176 posts, RR: 14
Reply 22, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 28279 times:

Question : Is the engine involved an original GEnx-1B or a GEnx-1B PIP1 engine ?


Operating a twin over the ocean, you're always one engine failure from a total emergency.
User currently offlineAngMoh From Singapore, joined Nov 2011, 492 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 28234 times:

Quoting sweair (Reply 21):
That engine has flown quite a bit on the 748 and 787 and any issue should have been found IMO. Maybe it is a manufacture fault? A loose blade somewhere missed in testing and inspection? It shouldn't happen though..

Maybe a tool or a part left from pre flight maintenance?

The Trent 900 on the A380 also had flown quite a bit till one blew up when nobody expected it. Same here, there could be a case where all the tolerances stack up the wrong way and the result is spectacular. Or somebody was sleeping and left a spanner where there should not be one, who knows...

I am pretty sure that GE/Boeing make a preliminary statement within a week which will be much more accurate than any speculation here.


User currently offlinesweair From Sweden, joined Nov 2011, 1827 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 28030 times:

I think I read that PIP2 will be installed in 2013 so PIP1 should be on the frames delivered this year.

It would be really bad if both engines have issues this far into the project.


25 PW100 : With all due respect, FOD seems unlikely to me. Reports are that the engine debris started a grass fire. That would strongly suggest that Hot Section
26 shankly : It would be really amazing if both engines did not have issues so EARLY into the project Those of us that grew up with the jets and the early turbofa
27 KC135TopBoom : My guess is (and it is only a guess) since Boeing did not mention any other damage to the aircraft, other than the engine, is they were exiting the r
28 avalon2862 : In addition to CHS being a fairly busy mid-size commercial airport, it's also a very busy USAF AMC base which is home to the 437th AW (comprised of 4
29 sweair : Given that these engines would have had close to 4 years of maturing by now I still say it is a bit surprising to have an issue like this. All the gr
30 PW100 : That would indeed suggest that it was not catastrophic to the engine. I hope this is the case. Still that leaves me wondering what hot part could hav
31 BoeingVista : Y'know, I'm gonna wait for the NTSB to confirm this. Boeing doesn't generally volunteer unfavourable information, this does not mean that this inform
32 Post contains images lightsaber : Remember, I used to engineer gas turbine Hot section parts. One of the worst FOD is sand. It plugs up the cooling holes. The FOD could be chemical, s
33 Aesma : Well, most engines spewing stuff are spewing FOD so I was just wondering, I have no preference for GE whatsoever.
34 motorhussy : In my country we've used 'campus' as a term to describe a collection of buildings that belong to a given institution, either academic or non-academic
35 Post contains images bikerthai : When you want to promote your facility as a "high tech" operation. In Everett, the 'factory" usually mean the main assembly building. The factory is
36 tdscanuck : Campus: a large, usually suburban, landscaped business or industrial site (one of several possible but legitimate definitions). One factor or one pla
37 Post contains links BoeingVista : Jon Ostrower tweets that FOD has been ruled out and that focus is now on rear hot turbine section of the GEnx-1b edit: GE say that they suspect probl
38 tdscanuck : If it's the LP and not FOD, most likely cause is a blade-out. Obviously unfortunate, not unheard of. Tom.
39 motorhussy : Surely if that was the case Tom, the focus would be more to the front of the engine? Or is there another lot of blades in the latter part? Need to ha
40 Stitch : GE went too aggressive with the LPT blade reduction on the GEnx, requiring them to add a fair number of blades back into the module with PiP1...
41 BoeingVista : Yup, this is how they clawed back some of the performance deficit. On the information *now* available this would seem to be the most likely cause. I
42 barney captain : Yup. Perhaps someone can confirm a WN departure and subsequent diversion due to FOD damage out of CHS shortly after the 787 engine "incident". Bad fo
43 sweair : Maybe they didn't notice this, I am sure Boeing follows all rules, silly to think otherwise IMO.
44 tdscanuck : "Blade out" just means you lost a blade. It can happen on any rotor; it's much more common to happen on the turbine than on the fan or compressor ("t
45 PW100 : They could have shut the engine down after abnormal engine parameters (Vibrations, ITT, Fuel Flow etc) as a result of some turbine failure. Provided
46 lightsaber : I would too like confirmation of such an event. Just not sporting to force Southwest to divert. Someone might have found that inconvenient. rephrase.
47 Post contains links barney captain : FWIW, http://flightaware.com/live/flight/S...4/history/20120728/1955Z/KCHS/KBNA
48 DocLightning : Wouldn't a turbine blade out cause a huge amount of vibration if the engine continued to run because of the imbalance? Why not? When I was in college
49 Post contains images lightsaber : Scooby says:"Roh Roh!" At least it all stayed in the GE/Boeing family. Lightsaber
50 tdscanuck : One blade is a very very small mass relative to the total disc/spool. Turbines routinely run in service with noticeable chunks of various blades miss
51 DocLightning : But wouldn't the monitoring system alert the flight deck?
52 Post contains images spiritair97 : I'm at CHS a lot and I see trucks doing runway sweeps fairly often.I guess they don't wanna take any chances with those monterous C-17s running in an
53 francoflier : I believe on a large enough airliner, an engine would have to practically shake itself loose before any vibration could be felt up front. Especially
54 tdscanuck : "Flight deck effect" is a technical term that means something in the EICAS/ECAM system happens to attract the attention of the flight crew...a master
55 DocLightning : Thought about this more. The bearings in a centrifuge are flexible and meant to tolerate some minor imbalance. The 'fuges would run up slowly and the
56 prebennorholm : The LPT on a GEnx doesn't spin at anywhere near 100,000 rpm. I don't have the exact numbers, but I would say between 3,000 and 4,000 rpm. Since centr
57 DocLightning : This would be more centrifuge RPM's and not ultracentrifuge RPM's. The HPT would be more in the realm of ultracentrifuge RPM. IIRC, in the 40k RPM ra
58 tdscanuck : 3,000-4,000 is a good estimate for the LP spool Not that quick. Big engine HP spool goes about 12,000-14,000 RPM as I recall. It all depends on which
59 prebennorholm : That would be on a small or mid sized turboprop engine. On a huge GEnx the HP spool rotates considerably slower, but still several times faster than
60 Post contains images DocLightning : I know that at the radii used in the centrifuges (20-30cm), that works out to about 200,000 gravities. Hope you're sitting in a very comfy chair!
61 ferpe : I seem to remember the values for the T1000, HP spool some 8-10k RPM, IP spool some 5-6k and the LP around 4 as Preben indicated. I would therefore gu
62 Post contains links 747classic : MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE ENGINE ROTOR SPEEDS for all GEnx variants. Base line GEnx-1B engine (787) GEnx-1B54, -1B58, -1B64, -1B67, -1B70 Low pressure rotor
63 bikerthai : Good info. To tie it all in, what would be N1 at idle, or taxi speed or at the speed that 787 was doing when the incident happened? Thanks, bt
64 prebennorholm : At ground idle N1 is pretty low on most high bypass turbofans, while N2 is in the region of half of max. At flight idle the power is a little higher,
65 Post contains links BoeingVista : The NTSB has added additional assets to its GEnx-1b investigation, it also seems that there was "significant damage" to the rear end of the GEnx-1b s
66 bikerthai : Well, maybe the tail end of the hot end where the cooling air has a chance to mix. . . since ignition temperature is constant, wouldn't the initial s
67 tdscanuck : It all depends on what the damage was and where it was relative to the sensors. I know of one twin that lost most of the thrust reverser inner wall o
68 francoflier : Well, I did know that. Mostly from spending never ending hours watching the damned Vib gauge on shaky engines. Which is why I believe the engine woul
69 Post contains images aeroblogger : AI deliveries put on hold until the issues which caused this incident are determined and rectified. Yet another delay
70 Post contains images Stitch : At which point they will demand compensation and/or bribes from GE, I expect. Oh and... called it!
71 aeroblogger : Possibly. I don't know. This announcement has come from the engineering department of AI rather than from AI management or the Ministry of Civil Avia
72 prebennorholm : Huh, that was a long "composite"-question. I really don't know where to start. But anyway: A turbine engine sucks all the air it can according to the
73 Post contains images lightsaber : This is so sad it is funny. I'm trying to figure out why myself. My rumor mill... has no facts today. You were just faster on the keys. Lightsaber
74 aeroblogger : I'd think it's fairly obvious? Technical issues with the aircraft, so AI wants to be cautious...
75 BoeingVista : This is good for us, at least we will have an answer fairly quickly.. Unless GE simply fork over the cash to grease the delivery wheel, which is poss
76 rwessel : Do both units record both CVR and FDR data, or is one unit dedicated to each? With current technology recording both should be no problem at all, and
77 DocLightning : I was once on a BAe-146 climbing out of DEN for ASE at night. I could see right into the exhaust nozzles and there was most certainly a reflected glo
78 BoeingVista : Both recorders record CVR and FDR data. Read the article that accompnied my post..
79 lightsaber : I typed poorly. I wonder why the GE engine tossed parts out the back. That is a big deal. I could speculate for hours. I still suspect FOD. In partic
80 bennett123 : Has AI figured out yet which pilots are going to fly them when they do arrive?.
81 aeroblogger : Yes. There are enough pilots to fly a 3 aircraft schedule on shorthaul, or a 4 aircraft schedule on longhaul, assumiing same utilization as current f
82 bikerthai : Makes sense. But if you want to maximize the efficiency of a high bi-pass engine, wouldn't you want to minimize the amount of excess air that does no
83 prebennorholm : Yes, that's right. But that's because the 146 has geared turbofans. The only operational airliner with a GTF engine. Non-geared turbofans are designe
84 DocLightning : Do you have a diagram? I kinda lost you here.
85 Post contains links prebennorholm : It doesn't. But when driving your car, even at moderate power, the catalytic converter gets glowing hot. When you then park on dry grass...!!! That c
86 Post contains images tdscanuck : Not exactly; you want to maximize the turbine inlet temperature (higher is better). They run it as high as they can. If you didn't have any excess ai
87 Post contains links and images prebennorholm : A picture tells more than a thousand words. So why not have a look at the Trent 1000... http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/images/NonSSPL/trent_1000.asp
88 Post contains links dakota123 : Fan mid-shaft failure, "...fractured at the forward end of the shaft, rear of the threads where the retaining nut is installed." http://www.heraldnet.
89 PW100 : Hmmm, that doesn't sound good, . . . at all. If I understand this correctly as that the fan/booster drive shaft broke, that could be a major problem.
90 DocLightning : Thank you both. That's interesting. I always figured it was to increase the cross-sectional area so as to allow the gas to expand. I now see that in
91 Stitch : I would think if this was a design fault, it would have happened earlier. That it happened on what may have been a new engine and at low power sounds
92 kanban : thought they were doing high speed taxi... doesn't that require a significant power setting?
93 dakota123 : Most likely test-cell time as well to full power, no?
94 Stitch : Even if it does, with all the high-power runs of GEnx engines in the lab, during flight test and certification flights for the 787 and 747-8, all the
95 prebennorholm : I don't think that's what happened. The bearing, which carries the axial load on the N1 shaft, is normally placed in the front and cold end of the en
96 aeroblogger : Makes sense... Now the question is whether the shaft failed due to manufacturing defect/maintenance or a design problem...
97 BoeingVista : No, not really. Both GE and RR find issues as engines age for example the CF6-80A fan disk failures. I'd argue that now is exactly when you would be
98 BoeingVista : No effect if the engine has already gained ETOPS certification as only failures that happen during ETOPS sectors contribute to the reliability figure
99 tdscanuck : Nope. The exhaust nozzle is too long, and the engine too low, to see into the tailpipe from the cabin. You can see it from the ground though. They wo
100 prebennorholm : Sure right, BoeingVista! This will be treated as a serious event, not some random thing which can be "covered" by statistics. How many hours have all
101 XT6Wagon : Um, The FAA didn't order the A380 with the Trent900 grounded when it nearly severed a main spar and did some fairly extensive damage to the control w
102 prebennorholm : Good for RR if you are right, and I have no reason to doubt that you are indeed right. I knew that the RR incident happened outside the normal operat
103 lightsaber : I agree. This is but one incident. I'm still betting on FOD. Something that blocked the cooling air in a set of turbine blades. Once a few blades fai
104 XT6Wagon : True, I forgot about that. I have no data on it, but the early reports made it sound like the airport was quite "dirty" after that repave.
105 Post contains links ferpe : Here is some more info: http://www.aviationweek.com/Article....e-xml/awx_08_08_2012_p0-484370.xml "The fan shaft forms the low-pressure spool of the G
106 Post contains links and images 747classic : Below a visualisation of the location of the shaft problem by Jon Ostrower (former Flightblogger) : Original uploaded by Jon Ostrower, see for other
107 BoeingVista : Still not seeing FOD, what you are saying here is that failed blades causes a heat build up of such magnitude to fail the shaft connection, surely we
108 bikerthai : Anyone know what material that shaft is made from? They will need to go back to see if the fracture showed up in NDI. bt
109 PW100 : I don't think I even suggested that that had happened . . . ? That indeed seemed to have been the case. Agree. Airworthiness does not seem to be in d
110 lightsaber : I am incorrect. My post is before that issue was noted. A breakable shaft nut is interesting... I had not realized GE went that route to lighten the
111 Ruscoe : I'd put my money on a foreign obje I expect this is due to the NTSB having a formal investigation. Ruscoe
112 tdscanuck : What Ruscoe said...NTSB owns the investigation. GE and Boeing would be flayed alive for making public comments on anything substantive while the inve
113 DocLightning : No, but it was seriously nerfed. Maximum power settings were severely limited. And, in fact, QF and SQ both grounded their A380 fleets after the acci
114 Post contains images lightsaber : If the turbine decouples from the fan, the turbine will destroy itself. The point of the nut that failed is to prevent a fan overspeed. It looks like
115 BoeingVista : Was it a nut failure? NTSB mentions a crack rear of the retaining nut hole and a crack in the shaft. sounds like the shaft let go, not the nut. From
116 bikerthai : The aviationweek article quoted by ferpe is a little confusing. "is thought to have emanated in the torque-retaining nut connecting the two. The NTSB
117 tdscanuck : Yes. A failure in this location frees the shaft axially so the turbine "instantly" crashes backwards into the stators and stops. The one to worry abo
118 DocLightning : Oh, so it's meant to lead to the backward slide. I get it now! I was thinking of the second case where the fan load is relieved by shaft failure but
119 Post contains images lightsaber : We need the pictures. Obviously the NTSB doesn't know the talent they're leaving on the sidelines here on a.net. Those are some of the most expensive
120 Post contains links and images BoeingVista : Ah, no contradiction when you see the assembly, I seem to be way off with the hole fracture though. Ok, Pictures of the assembly in question. http://
121 Post contains images PW100 : Nitpicking is the term, I believe . . . I'd argue that those are the most cheapest break pads and rotors on the market . . . At the moment they are r
122 Post contains images BoeingVista : I would think that the splined area sits inside a bearing that is attached to the case in some fashion. Here's how a GEnx-1b fits together, I'm guess
123 PW100 : Agree. But this shaft's splined-end sitting inside that bearing could not transfer any significant axial loads to that bearing. If you want to design
124 Post contains images cf6ppe : I was waiting for someone to post a pictures/diagram such as in post #123 and #120. I'll try to explain from my experience with most of the different
125 Post contains images DocLightning : Not only that, but at the moment that they are required as brake pads and rotors, they prevent a FAR more expensive event (uncontained failure). So a
126 Post contains links 747classic : Below is a link of a video about the assembly of a GEnx-2B engine. Clearly visible is the assembly of the fan mid-shaft (with attached LPT) through th
127 DocLightning : Sorry to be a "show me pitchers" guy, but can you maybe provide a diagram of your last paragraph?
128 xdlx : Where was the shaft that failed made? How many on same batch? That should be answered soon.....
129 cf6ppe : Sorry, but I don't got any pictures to show. 'darn..!! Maybe, someone can help us with a page showing a typical fan mid shaft - fan forward shaft joi
130 Post contains images lightsaber : Thank you. I'm neither a stress engineer nor a design engineer. My training in that area is just enough to be dangerous. So I'll have to let someone
131 spink : The GE LM6000 has 57,330 SHP and is based off of the CF6-80C2 which has 63,500 max thrust. It would stand to reason that the the GenX-1B would be rou
132 Post contains links and images jetmech : The last engaged thread of a bolt/nut etc. is apparently the area with the highest stress concentration. I know it is dangerous to speculate, but per
133 DocLightning : Thanks, Jetmech. You've been very helpful. At the beginning of this thread it was mentioned that there was no flight deck indication of a failure. Do
134 tdscanuck : That was back when it was speculation on FOD causing the turbine to throw a blade. A shaft separation followed by "crash" of the LPT would have fligh
135 LTC8K6 : That sounds like it did what it was supposed to do. Possibly before it was supposed to do it? Or did the engine have a problem/overspeed and do what
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Allegiant Engine Fire In Wichita posted Wed Nov 18 2009 21:19:34 by Ginger727
YX Engine Fire In MKE posted Mon May 24 2004 05:02:15 by Vivavegas
UA A320 Engine Fire In San Francisco posted Fri May 30 2003 18:50:23 by AS739X
TWA 757 Engine Fire In MCO Last Night? posted Fri Mar 17 2000 17:29:21 by Trnswrld
ATC Facility Fire In Atlantic City posted Fri Jun 22 2012 18:53:16 by canyonblue17
Hangar Fire In Inuvik Destroys Three Planes posted Fri Nov 5 2010 17:08:52 by CanadianNorth
HV Cabin Fire In AMS posted Mon May 10 2010 12:21:23 by KL1291
DCA Closed - DL 757 Engine Catches Fire On Takeoff posted Sun Aug 2 2009 17:11:05 by D L X
VS Emergency Landing - Reported Fire In Cabin posted Sun Jan 11 2009 06:26:03 by Christopherwoo
Basketball Charter Flight Engine On Fire... posted Tue Jan 6 2009 15:12:10 by Boeing727