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FAA Fines Fedex – Hazmat Violations  
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25045 posts, RR: 46
Posted (2 years 1 week 3 days ago) and read 3914 times:

The FAA is proposing a $681,200 civil penalty against Fedex for violations of DOT hazardous materials regulations.

FAA alleges that over a 10-day period in August 2010, inspectors noted that at numerous locations across the country, Fedex employees accepting several dozen shipments containing hazardous materials for transportation without accurate records.

Additionally the FAA noted that on 19 instances the airline failed to properly notify pilots of accurate and legible written information about shipments of hazmat loaded on aircraft.

Lastly the FAA alleges Fedex failed to properly document training and testing for 3 employees whose duty included accepting and handling hazmat shipments.

Press release
http://www.faa.gov/news/press_releases/news_story.cfm?newsId=13817

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From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7392 posts, RR: 17
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3785 times:

I joined the forums in March so I'm none too familiar with these types of regulations, but has the FAA just gone on a fining spree recently, or does this happen quite often this time of the year?

Quoting LAXintl (Thread starter):
Additionally the FAA noted that on 19 instances the airline failed to properly notify pilots of accurate and legible written information about shipments of hazmat loaded on aircraft.

Jeez thats not safe    I'd hate to NOT know what I'm flying, especially if it's across one of the ponds.



次は、渋谷、渋谷。出口は、右側です。電車とホームの間は広く開いておりますので、足元に注意下さい。
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25045 posts, RR: 46
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3755 times:

The last hazmat fines I recall was one for Fedex also, and another for US Airways.

FAA Fines FedEx For Hazmat Violations (by LAXintl Jul 11 2011 in Civil Aviation)
FAA Fines US Airways - Hazmat Violations (by LAXintl May 17 2012 in Civil Aviation)

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From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineHPRamper From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4055 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 3539 times:

This was two years ago. Presumably the FAA takes quite a while to build cases on this stuff.

Of note is that a certain few stations were responsible for the majority of these incidents and I would also presume that management at those facilities has had some turnover in recent years for obvious reasons.

I do know that FX is auditing itself very strongly on any and all FAA guidelines as a result of certain people thinking they were above the law, so to speak.


User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3335 times:

DGR is very seriously monitored in Freight Airlines....Including documentation,packaging,access to the DG in flight.....


Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9269 posts, RR: 29
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3325 times:

I am saying this for years - the business model of the integrators is asking for this kind of trouble.

You just have to be literate and be able to follow through the masks on the PC to become a "traffic manager" in many countries.

That's not enough to qualify for the job but it is one of the reasons why DG / hazmat lands uncontrolled in cargo aircraft. It is safe to say that this happens every day. It becomes real dangerous when the DG freight does not stay on-line with the integrators but is transferred to paqssenger carriers for stations which are not served directl.y

Same goes for terrorist activities. Some obscure shipper in Yemen managed to forward a bomb on a QR flight from sanaa via DOH to DXB to connect there with a UPS flight to CGN where it was transferred to another UPS flight via EMA to ORD.

Luckily, they found the parcel at EMA before the flight departed.

This occasion has been taken as reason for even more ocntrols in Germany, although such controls and regulations could not have stopped the incident here. Kneejerk reaction by stupid politicians who do not have a clue what the are deciding about, all because of an insufficient business model which was createe by integrators and which does not hold up to safety standards in reality.

Quoting HAWK21M (Reply 4):
DGR is very seriously monitored in Freight Airlines....Including documentation,packaging,access to the DG in flight.....

You have to distnct between integrators (those we are talking here) and freight airlines resp. combination carriers like LH, KE, CX who opearte cargo and passenger aircraft. The latter use the services of freight forwarders who know their clientele, know what they are shipping and employ at least 2 clerks who regularly have to undergo DG training. On top of that., cargo/combination carriers double check DG on receipt and this is done by clerks with current licenses only.

Shipping DG is absolutely safe on passenger / cargo airlines, it is not with integrators. The latter are proving this year after year and fines slammed upon them by the FAA will not better the situation.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlinedeclarets From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2011, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3323 times:

This doesnt suprise me, i have I have seen quite a lot of shipments that have been sent over on various carriers from the US that shouldnt have been sent including one of the carriers mentioned. Either the documentation hasnt been completed properly, the packaging is incorrect for whats been packed inside it or its not labelled properly. These have then failed the DGR check here in the UK and have had to be repacked in order to be sent on to the final destination.

User currently offlinedeclarets From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2011, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3302 times:

Quoting PanHAM (Reply 5):

This occasion has been taken as reason for even more ocntrols in Germany, although such controls and regulations could not have stopped the incident here. Kneejerk reaction by stupid politicians who do not have a clue what the are deciding about, all because of an insufficient business model which was createe by integrators and which does not hold up to safety standards in reality.

The TSA are a prime example on this, imposing restrictions on air cargo being sent to the US and cargo agents having to complete a airway bill acceptance statement regarding the shipment and the relationship between the shipper and cargo agent. But atleast now the TSA have seen sense and we no longer have to do this here in the UK.


User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2510 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 3199 times:

Quoting PanHAM (Reply 5):
Shipping DG is absolutely safe on passenger / cargo airlines, it is not with integrators.

I wouldn't go that far. There are many examples of forwarders being fined by the FAA or other agencies for failing to follow IATA DG regulations. Whenever humans are involved, there is a chance for error. Doesn't matter if it's an airline, an integrator or a forwarder. You also add shippers into the mix - some have no idea that a commodity may be considered DG and ship them un-declared. Unless the forwarder has reason to suspect a DG and opens the cartons, they get sent through the chain. I've seen it happen - have been at the destination end when a shipment arrived and the packaging was damaged partially exposing the contents.


User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9269 posts, RR: 29
Reply 9, posted (2 years 1 week 2 days ago) and read 3155 times:

Quoting ER757 (Reply 8):
I wouldn't go that far.

I am talking about my country and my professional experience. The redundancy is three ways, often 4 ways. Shippers here, especially those who produce DG, know what they have to do. watrehouse bstaff, if contracted by a freight forwarder, does pre-checks, the freight forwarder has to be current and the final step is the airline itself. I would talk different if "my country" would be across the big lake.


Your example of damaged package might as well have been a "security inspeciaion" by, or on behalf a famous agency that makes air travel more dangerous than it would be without TSA. The point simply is, DG, properly packed in line with rules and regulations, must not be "inspected". But what can you expect from an agency whose employees do mountain climbing on parked aircraft.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineaa61hvy From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 13977 posts, RR: 57
Reply 10, posted (2 years 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 3049 times:

Quoting LAXintl (Thread starter):
FAA alleges that over a 10-day period in August 2010, inspectors noted that at numerous locations across the country, Fedex employees accepting several dozen shipments containing hazardous materials for transportation without accurate records.

As I've stated in your previous haz mat threads... 99% of the violations occur because the shippers do not file the proper paper work and the carrier has no idea that there is something haz in the box.

Not giving FX a pass but it always comes down to the shipper... And unfortunately businesses are cheap and they don't want to pay the $50 haz fee per box....



Go big or go home
User currently offlinedeclarets From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2011, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 3001 times:

Quoting ER757 (Reply 8):
some have no idea that a commodity may be considered DG and ship them un-declared.

With regards to shippers (companies) ignorance is not an excuse, shippers should be aware whether what they are sending is hazardous goods or not.

Quoting ER757 (Reply 8):
Unless the forwarder has reason to suspect a DG and opens the cartons

This is why it is vital that all cargo is security screened, well trained xray operators will be able to detect hazardous items in shipments.

Quoting aa61hvy (Reply 10):
99% of the violations occur because the shippers do not file the proper paper work and the carrier has no idea that there is something haz in the box



Thats not the carriers fault if there is undeclared DG in shipments and that is not what the article mentions. FX havent kept records of Haz shipments they were accepting and loading onto aircraft. Certain Hazardous items need to be accessible on the aircraft during flight, and the pilot and crew need to be aware of what they are carrying, looks like it is a case of people at FX not doing their job properly.


User currently offlineER757 From Cayman Islands, joined May 2005, 2510 posts, RR: 7
Reply 12, posted (2 years 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 2910 times:

Quoting declarets (Reply 11):
With regards to shippers (companies) ignorance is not an excuse, shippers should be aware whether what they are sending is hazardous goods or not.

Completely agree but believe me when I tell you, lots of shippers who have DG freight don't even know it. I wish I had a dollar for every customer I talked to over the years who, after some questioning when they call in their pick up and I have determined it's hazmat, have never heard of an IATA Shipper's Declaration of Dangerous Goods let alone know how to fill one out and use UN spec packaging.

Quoting declarets (Reply 11):
Thats not the carriers fault if there is undeclared DG in shipments

But there certainly have been fines levied against carriers in these cases. The ruling authorities assume shared responsibility. The shippers usually get the worst if it though, sometimes including jail time for the people responsible if the violation results in the loss of property (an aircraft) or life.


User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9269 posts, RR: 29
Reply 13, posted (2 years 1 week 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2798 times:

Quoting declarets (Reply 11):
This is why it is vital that all cargo is security screened, well trained xray operators will be able to detect hazardous items in shipments.

sorry but that's not the solution. DG training and knowledge is about safety.

Screening is about security, luckily the English language has 2 different words for that. Security people are trained to respond when the machine sees something fishy. in reality, that comes after the shipment has been received for carriage and has undergonbe the DG checks at least twice.

Now, a security guy sees some liquid and decides to physically inspect the shipment. that's when safety goes down the drain and shipment becomes unsafe. laqws and authorities must prevent exactly such situations.

Do not expect a security guy to have a cent of knowledge about safety and DG procedures.



Quoting ER757 (Reply 8):
Unless the forwarder has reason to suspect a DG and opens the cartons, they get sent through the chain. I've seen it happen - have been at the destination end when a shipment arrived and the packaging was damaged partially exposing the contents.

forgot to say that before DG safety inspection checks the details on the certificate, checks that the goods are properly packed in line with regulations. If the goods are not properly packed the shipper has to decide if he will take it back and pack according to the rules or have the forwarder contract a packing company that is certified to handle the job.

If a shipment arrives damaged, the damage has happened in the custody of the carrier, since all shipments are received only "ready for carriage" and that includes proper packaging.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 14, posted (2 years 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2691 times:

A DG leaks on the Aircraft....whats the staff SOP.........


Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlinedeclarets From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2011, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2684 times:

Quoting PanHAM (Reply 13):

My comments in regards to screening is for undeclared dangerous. Cargo xray operators in the UK are required to have DGR knowledge. You are not only looking for threats in terms of devices etc but also dangerous goods that have not been declared. Obviously this is not the same in Germany.


User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9269 posts, RR: 29
Reply 16, posted (2 years 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2601 times:

Quoting declarets (Reply 15):
My comments in regards to screening is for undeclared dangerous. Cargo xray operators in the UK are required to have DGR knowledge.

OK, sorry. but that is obsolete with cargo carriers or combination carriers like LH, simply because the DG check has been carried out for sure and there is nothing left to check for the security guy.

I agree when it comes to integrators freight.

.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
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