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Worker Killed At YUL  
User currently offlineaircellist From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1735 posts, RR: 8
Posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 11374 times:

A young man changing a tire on a tug has been killed when the tug apparently fell on him... RIP and condolences to the family and friends...

http://www.radio-canada.ca/regions/M...vail-mortel-aeroport-trudeau.shtml

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlineEASTERN747 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 563 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 11116 times:

OMG.... What the hell is a 21 year old (if my French is correct....mais mauvais) doing a tire change ALONE without a more experienced helper........Union crap again......RIP

User currently offlinespqr From Canada, joined Jun 2011, 105 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 11000 times:

What a shame, condolences to his friends and family. The article said there were 2 other mechanics there. The tug is owned by Swissport, but the mechanic was a contractor. I've never worked with an airport tug, but would he need to go underneath it to change the tire? From the photo with the article, I hope the cribbing and jack were part of the rescue effort and not what was used when he went under in the first place.

User currently offlineblueflyer From Northern Mariana Islands, joined Jan 2006, 4196 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 10966 times:
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Comments below the article state the hydraulic lift under the tug somehow slipped and fell out of position.


I've got $h*t to do
User currently offlinecyeg66 From Canada, joined Feb 2011, 210 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 10941 times:

  Poor guy. I can only hope, and safely assume, that it was quick and relatively painless. RIP, young fella.


slow to 160, contact tower, slow to 160, contact tower, slow to....ZZZZZZZ......
User currently offlineflyhossd From United States of America, joined Nov 2009, 981 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 10893 times:

Quoting EASTERN747 (Reply 1):
Union crap again.

First, rest in peace, young man. My thoughts are with your family.

"Union crap again." How did you reach that conclusion? Honestly, I'd like to know (i.e., follow your train of thought).



My statements do not represent my former employer or my current employer and are my opinions only.
User currently offlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15845 posts, RR: 27
Reply 6, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 10757 times:

Quoting EASTERN747 (Reply 1):
What the hell is a 21 year old (if my French is correct....mais mauvais) doing a tire change ALONE without a more experienced helper

Yeah, that's just not a great idea. I never jack up my car to work on it if nobody else is home.

A neighbor of mine died when he was digging a trench. His wife and family went off to lunch and he decided to do a bit more work before joining them. As far as anyone could tell, the machine rolled over him when he accidentally left it in gear and he suffocated.

Working alone with dangerous machinery is just not something people should do.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlineflyhossd From United States of America, joined Nov 2009, 981 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 10723 times:

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 6):
Yeah, that's just not a great idea. I never jack up my car to work on it if nobody else is home.

Working alone with dangerous machinery is just not something people should do.

The article in the original post states that "Two other mechanics were on site at the time of the accident."



My statements do not represent my former employer or my current employer and are my opinions only.
User currently offlinebergkampsticket From UK - Scotland, joined Jan 2012, 39 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 10659 times:

Quoting flyhossd (Reply 5):

I echo your sentiments, RIP to the young man.

I can't see this train of thought either. Unions have done a lot of good in regard to safe operating in the industry and certainly don't advocate unsafe working practices. Probably ignorance and bitterness on display here.


User currently offlinebeau222 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 117 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 10610 times:

I have witnessed about four tire changings in my time and not once do I recall MTC ever having to go under any part of the tug to change the tire.

User currently onlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12973 posts, RR: 25
Reply 10, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 7329 times:

Very sad news!

It's a dangerous job working on the ramp, so be careful out there!



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently onlinefalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6181 posts, RR: 31
Reply 11, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 6944 times:
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Quoting EASTERN747 (Reply 1):
What the hell is a 21 year old (if my French is correct....mais mauvais) doing a tire change ALONE without a more experienced helper.

I was working in a tire shop mounting and balancing tires when I was 18. We put tires and wheels on all sorts of cars and trucks (including some very large ones). I train 16-18 year olds to do it all the time. Mechanical work can be dangerous so you need to train people about the safety aswell as how to do the actual job.

Quoting beau222 (Reply 9):
I have witnessed about four tire changings in my time and not once do I recall MTC ever having to go under any part of the tug to change the tire.

I wonder if he was mounting a jack stand under it and it fell on him.

Quoting blueflyer (Reply 3):
Comments below the article state the hydraulic lift under the tug somehow slipped and fell out of position.

I could see that. i don't know what kind of lifting equipment was being used, but if you are using a rolling floor jack all the wheels need to be able to roll. If a wheel doesn't roll with the jack while it is going up the jack will slip out of position. You should always use a jack stand and never rely on a jack alone, but there is the short period of time when the jack stand is being placed the jack could fail and you would be screwed.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlinemm320cap From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 229 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 5 days ago) and read 6670 times:

Quoting EASTERN747 (Reply 1):
OMG.... What the hell is a 21 year old (if my French is correct....mais mauvais) doing a tire change ALONE without a more experienced helper........Union crap again......RIP

Congratulations. You managed to A) politicize a thread which should be entirely devoted to the sad demise of a young man B) Prove that you can't read.... or use Google Translate, as there were two other mechanics on the scene C) Display an INCREDIBLE breadth of knowledge about Candian Union Membership to know that the company the young man worked for was indeed union represented *sarcasm* D) Managed to publicly display that you haven't got the faintest idea what you are talking about. Unions were formed years ago to improve conditions for workers who were being mistreated by their management concerned with nothing but the bottom line. Almost exclusively, it is Unions that demand safer conditions and practices, and management that doesn't want to pay for it. Unions are accused of many things. Some of them accurate, some of them not. But to suggest that a UNION would be the one to suggest this young man change that tire alone (which of course wasn't the case) while the COMPANY would have wanted more workers to help shows a breathtaking level of ignorance.

What a tragic loss of a young life.


User currently onlinefalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6181 posts, RR: 31
Reply 13, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 5890 times:
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Quoting mm320cap (Reply 12):
it is Unions that demand safer conditions and practices

I am not the biggest fan of unions, but it it is true that they are very big on safety and making sure that people are properly trained to do the job. I have been to a UAW training center a few times, with my students, and I have been very impressed with the level of training my students received. The UAW instructors are tough with safety regulations and don't make exceptions.

Quoting mm320cap (Reply 12):
But to suggest that a UNION would be the one to suggest this young man change that tire alone (which of course wasn't the case) while the COMPANY would have wanted more workers to help shows a breathtaking level of ignorance.

When it comes to worker safety and reducing injury the union and the company usually work hand and hand these days, especially if said company is responsible. I'll give you an example.

A buddy of mine worked at Ford's Michigan Truck plant 1975-1980 decking tires/wheels. It was a back breaking job that got a lot of people hurt and resulted in downtime. The mounted tires would roll down a conveyor and the line worker would put lift them up and install them on the truck. Flash forward to 2011; we were in the plant and saw how it is done today. The mounted tires come off the conveyor on to a bench with rolling balls on it. The bench is air assisted and raises the tire/wheel to the hub level on the truck and the line worker pushes it on to the truck and puts on the lugs. Company and union officials told us that even though this process is more expensive it saves downtime due to injury and increases productivity. The Union doesn't want to see its members get hurt and they company doesn't want the costs associated with injured employees.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlinemm320cap From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 229 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 4632 times:

Quoting falstaff (Reply 13):
When it comes to worker safety and reducing injury the union and the company usually work hand and hand these days, especially if said company is responsible. I'll give you an example.

A buddy of mine worked at Ford's Michigan Truck plant 1975-1980 decking tires/wheels. It was a back breaking job that got a lot of people hurt and resulted in downtime. The mounted tires would roll down a conveyor and the line worker would put lift them up and install them on the truck. Flash forward to 2011; we were in the plant and saw how it is done today. The mounted tires come off the conveyor on to a bench with rolling balls on it. The bench is air assisted and raises the tire/wheel to the hub level on the truck and the line worker pushes it on to the truck and puts on the lugs. Company and union officials told us that even though this process is more expensive it saves downtime due to injury and increases productivity. The Union doesn't want to see its members get hurt and they company doesn't want the costs associated with injured employees.

This is a good example of a company and unions working together for a successful outcome... kudos to Ford.

As a 20 year Union member, I've seen plenty of the good and bad of organized labor. There are times when I feel my 2% is well spent, and other times when I am greatly disturbed at damage done that I consider counter productive. There is a fine line and it is crossed by both sides from time to time.

While you post a great example of a company stepping up to the plate to do what is RIGHT and SAFE even if it costs a bit more, sadly I have experienced many examples of the opposite occurring. The latest that made the hair on the back of my neck stand up at my own company were A) paying to remove the secondary cockpit barriers on the 787 at UAL, and B) the rush to change sUAL flight deck procedures to match sCAL's for the B767 and B777 pilots with ZERO simulator time dedicated to ensure the safe understanding and execution of said changes. Many on this board accused the union of "playing politics", insisting that there couldn't POSSIBLY be a safety issue. Of course, I equate that to telling a brain surgeon that he should be FINE to operate in an entirely new way with nothing more than a quick handout because I played Doctor with a couple of young ladies when I was a little boy.

At any rate, I apologize for the thread hijack here. As I mentioned to the original offender, this thread should be about the tragic death of the 21 year old worker, and not about Union bashing.


User currently offlinebristolflyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2312 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (2 years 4 months 2 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2860 times:

Quoting falstaff (Reply 11):
You should always use a jack stand and never rely on a jack alone, but there is the short period of time when the jack stand is being placed the jack could fail and you would be screwed.

Could you not position the jack stand under the tug with a stick, meaning that if the jack did fail then it would squash the stick and not the person?



Fortune favours the brave
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