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Forced Landing During PPL Test, Pilot Passes Test  
User currently offlinebristolflyer From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 2297 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11805 times:

In Colorado today:

A pilot and his passenger escaped injury Saturday afternoon after having to make a hard emergency landing in a wheat field northeast of Longmont.

Brian Garrett, the pilot, was undergoing a certification examination conducted by Drew Chitiea, an FAA designated pilot examiner, when the propeller on the single-engine plane lost one blade, forcing them to find a landing spot and glide into the field on a farm in the 14000 block of Weld County Road 5.

By the time the plane landed, a second blade also had sheared off, but the plane appeared otherwise undamaged.

Neither man aboard the plane was injured.

Garrett, who is part-owner of the "Sting Sport TL200" plane, was attempting to earn his private pilot's license during the flight. After the landing, Chitiea told him he had passed the test.

The flight originated from and was scheduled to return to Erie Municipal Airport.

Good to see he passed the test!

http://www.dailycamera.com/news/ci_2...rews-investigate-report-plane-down


Fortune favours the brave
22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinetype-rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 11489 times:

A similar thing happened at our school with a guy on a PPL checkride.

After performing all the maneuvers and navigation tests during the ride they were back on their way to the airport where the examiner pulled the engine for an emergency landing test. The person being tested lined the aircraft up for the field he intended to land in and then when it was clear the student would have made it the examiner put some power on and the engine promptly quit. So since they were only about 50' AGL they ended up having to land. The aircraft hit a pothole and flipped over on its back. Fortunately it did not catch fire.

But since this was the last thng on the checklist and he DID make the field, he passed.

A few weeks later the aircraft was repaired and put back in service. A few weeks later I used it for my PPL ride. It actually flew very nicely, like a brand new aircraft.

The mechanics thought it may have been an iced up carb since they were at 5,000 AGL when the throttle was pulled and it remained at idle revs all the way to the ground.


User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6688 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 11374 times:

Did the FAA guy call his employer to let them know they should review the certification of the plane ?

 



New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlineOB1504 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 3362 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 11041 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 1):
The mechanics thought it may have been an iced up carb since they were at 5,000 AGL when the throttle was pulled and it remained at idle revs all the way to the ground.

The pilot didn't pull the carb heat when running at low RPM?


User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8292 posts, RR: 23
Reply 4, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 10980 times:

Quoting bristolflyer (Thread starter):
"Sting Sport TL200"

NEVER heard of it.

Word to the wise: don't fly airplanes nobody's ever heard of, they fall apart.

Good job making it out safely though.



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User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8964 posts, RR: 39
Reply 5, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 10916 times:

Why didn't the examiner take over?  


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User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8292 posts, RR: 23
Reply 6, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 10917 times:

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 5):
Why didn't the examiner take over?

I doubt he could do much better. As long as the PIC is handling the emergency, there's no need for the examiner to barge in. A field seems like it was inevitable.



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User currently onlineairtran737 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3704 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 10859 times:
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Quoting PPVRA (Reply 5):
Why didn't the examiner take over?

If the student has set his pitch for best glide, configured for landing and selected an adequate landing spot then there is no reason for the examiner to take over. On my checkrides from AMEL through my CFI's I had a crew briefing with the examiner stating that I am the PIC, and in the event of an emergency we will use CRM to work the emergency together until we put it down. I doubt that the pilot had received CRM training, but I would bet that he an the DPE worked the situation together.



Nice Trip Report!!! Great Pics, thanks for posting!!!! B747Forever
User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5653 posts, RR: 6
Reply 8, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 10798 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 1):


The mechanics thought it may have been an iced up carb since they were at 5,000 AGL when the throttle was pulled and it remained at idle revs all the way to the ground.
Quoting OB1504 (Reply 3):

The pilot didn't pull the carb heat when running at low RPM?

Yeah, that was a bit of a boo-boo. Anytime I did a simulated engine-out, the instructor would always bump the engine out of idle every minute to clear it and keep it warm. It was a habit that has stuck with me when running at idle for more than a couple of minutes.

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 5):
Why didn't the examiner take over?

Why would they need to?



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently offlineDiamondFlyer From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 1557 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 10747 times:

Quoting N766UA (Reply 4):
NEVER heard of it.

Word to the wise: don't fly airplanes nobody's ever heard of, they fall apart.

I have, its an LSA. Probably fairly new, since they haven't been out that long. Wonder what caused a loss of power, the Rotax 912 is a fairly robust engine.

-DiamondFlyer


User currently offlinercair1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 1323 posts, RR: 52
Reply 10, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 10637 times:
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Quoting N766UA (Reply 6):
I doubt he could do much better. As long as the PIC is handling the emergency, there's no need for the examiner to barge in. A field seems like it was inevitable.

In a check ride - for the first time non-solo - the student is the PIC. The check pilot has no official right to take over - the student is PIC. I remember this was stressed by the check pilot in my final test - he made a big point of of it.

Quoting DiamondFlyer (Reply 9):
Wonder what caused a loss of power, the Rotax 912 is a fairly robust engine.

The propeller failing cause the loss in power ....



rcair1
User currently offlinebueb0g From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2010, 644 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 10396 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 1):
So since they were only about 50' AGL

50'? Really? That would have been illegal up until the engine actually failed.

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 5):

Why didn't the examiner take over?  

I guess the examiner trusted the student to be able to fly it, in part due to the fact that he was actually pretty experienced - "he's been flying for about 21/2 years as a certified sport pilot. "



Roger roger, what's our vector, victor?
User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2433 posts, RR: 13
Reply 12, posted (2 years 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 9372 times:

Quoting bristolflyer (Thread starter):
Good to see he passed the test!

Happened at a practical car driving examination here. The student drove the car, and the first part was driving on the highway. There, an overpassing truck sheared off the left mirror, the student pulled over, called the police, set up the warning triangle, examination passed... five minutes after it began.


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlinefreeze3192 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 164 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (2 years 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 6632 times:

Quoting N766UA (Reply 4):
Quoting bristolflyer (Thread starter):
"Sting Sport TL200"

NEVER heard of it.

Word to the wise: don't fly airplanes nobody's ever heard of, they fall apart.


That's probably the most ignorant thing anyone has ever said on this board. Some of the most fun I've had when flying was flying in airplanes that no one has ever heard of. And no, they didn't fall apart. These airplanes were actually built a heck of a lot better (and not as cheap) as their run of the mill GA counterparts.

[Edited 2012-09-02 10:00:06]


"A passenger bets his life that his pilot is a worthy heir to an ancient tradition of excellence and professionalism."
User currently offlineairplanenut From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 658 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (2 years 4 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 6615 times:

Quoting rcair1 (Reply 10):
In a check ride - for the first time non-solo - the student is the PIC. The check pilot has no official right to take over - the student is PIC. I remember this was stressed by the check pilot in my final test - he made a big point of of it.

Same here. My DPE reminded me that he was a good resource if I needed it (his thousands of hours in jets vs. my 49.5 in trainers) but unless I said otherwise, I called all the shots on the flight.



Why yes, in fact, I am a rocket scientist...
User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8292 posts, RR: 23
Reply 15, posted (2 years 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 6084 times:

Quoting rcair1 (Reply 10):
In a check ride - for the first time non-solo - the student is the PIC. The check pilot has no official right to take over - the student is PIC.

Yep, that's what I said.

Quoting freeze3192 (Reply 13):
That's probably the most ignorant thing anyone has ever said on this board.

LOL you're telling me you've been on this website for 5 years and THAT is the most ignorant thing you've heard?! Interesting coincidence, I guess, because that comment is about the most ignorant thing I've heard.  

I'd suggest taking a look through the NTSB reporter once in a while, the vast majority of accidents are in kit planes, light sports, and "airplanes nobody's heard of."



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User currently offlineflylku From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 810 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (2 years 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 5988 times:

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 5):
Why didn't the examiner take over?
Quoting bueb0g (Reply 11):
I guess the examiner trusted the student to be able to fly it, in part due to the fact that he was actually pretty experienced - "he's been flying for about 21/2 years as a certified sport pilot. "

Indeed. Could be that the examiner, while a much more experienced pilot, had no experience in that aircraft and if the pilot in command was demonstrating control of the situation elected to allow him to continue.

Some of those fields out there are really big. I lift in Virginia where the fields are smaller, tree lined, sometimes filled with rocks and often rolling. One must be very precise at "hitting" the desired touchdown point at the desired airspeed.



...are we there yet?
User currently offlineDiamondFlyer From United States of America, joined Oct 2008, 1557 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (2 years 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 5891 times:

Quoting N766UA (Reply 15):
I'd suggest taking a look through the NTSB reporter once in a while, the vast majority of accidents are in kit planes, light sports, and "airplanes nobody's heard of."

I have. And I routinely see more planes built by Cessna and Piper. Perhaps you've never heard of them either? Perhaps you should stick to flying on your Boeing and Airbus if you think anything you've never heard of isn't safe.

-DiamondFlyer


User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8292 posts, RR: 23
Reply 18, posted (2 years 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 5840 times:

Quoting DiamondFlyer (Reply 17):
I have. And I routinely see more planes built by Cessna and Piper. Perhaps you've never heard of them either? Perhaps you should stick to flying on your Boeing and Airbus if you think anything you've never heard of isn't safe.

Wait, what's an Airbus? I only fly on Boeings.



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User currently offlineJHCRJ700 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 377 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (2 years 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 5055 times:

My checkride was pretty hellacious but fortunately not that bad. Good job to the PIC.


RUSH
User currently offlinetype-rated From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (2 years 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4311 times:

Quoting OB1504 (Reply 3):
The pilot didn't pull the carb heat when running at low RPM?

When descending for long periods of time even though you have carb heat on, you should give the throttle a boost every now and then to keep the engine warm. Even though you have carb heat on, the exhaust system can cool to the point that carb heat becomes somewhat ineffective.

Quoting bueb0g (Reply 11):
50'? Really? That would have been illegal up until the engine actually failed.

This was out in a very open rural area with no buildings or people about miles around. Remember they were simulating an emergency landing and they started at 5,000 AGL. Nothing illegal about it.


User currently offlinefreeze3192 From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 164 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (2 years 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 3792 times:

Quoting N766UA (Reply 15):
LOL you're telling me you've been on this website for 5 years and THAT is the most ignorant thing you've heard?! Interesting coincidence, I guess, because that comment is about the most ignorant thing I've heard.

I'd suggest taking a look through the NTSB reporter once in a while, the vast majority of accidents are in kit planes, light sports, and "airplanes nobody's heard of."

You're absolutely correct. It IS the most ignorant thing I've heard from someone on this board who apparently works in Aviation.

I've flown 4 different types of LSAs, and they were leaps and bounds more fun, better built and better performers than what Cessna or Piper could put out.

Airplanes are machines, they break down and sometimes it happens in the air. That being said, I've never felt more comfortable in a single engine piston airplane than when in an LSA with a Rotax 912 up front purring along at 5200 rpms. Solidly built, engineered well, safe and comfortable to fly. I would much rather rent a brand new Flight Design CTLS with a glass cockpit, GPS, WX, XM, autopilot, BRS chute, and 7 hrs of range for $100/hr than a clapped out 1985 172 for the same price.



"A passenger bets his life that his pilot is a worthy heir to an ancient tradition of excellence and professionalism."
User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5653 posts, RR: 6
Reply 22, posted (2 years 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3658 times:

Quoting JHCRJ700 (Reply 19):
My checkride was pretty hellacious but fortunately not that bad.

I actually got a bit airsick during my checkride. Asked the DPE to fly it for a few minutes while I got some water and settled down... she was impressed that I did so.

As they say: the airplane tends to fly itself. The hard part is the decision making.



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
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