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Petition To Carry Musical Instruments On Board  
User currently offlineAircellist From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1726 posts, RR: 8
Posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 12371 times:

Cellist Paul Katz had a distressing moment on Westjet a few days ago. He thought he had purchased a ticket to fly from YYC to LAX on AA... yet, because of a codeshare, he was indeed on Westjet. He had purchased a ticket to carry his cello, a 1669 Andrea Guarneri which must be valued a small fortune, onboard.

Once in the plane, he was told, to his great distress, that he had to send his cello in the luggage compartment. He's been bumped after boarding. This is his story, written as it unfolded.

http://articles.boston.com/2012-08-2...6_1_cello-flight-attendant-westjet

Excerpt:

Quote:
Check the cello in baggage or get off the plane. That’s my choice.

“Sweet,” I say. “If I get off, how will you get me there?"

“Please understand, sir, the cello will not be allowed on any other WestJet aircraft.”

“Will you put me on another airline?”

“That will be your own responsibility.”

In the aftermath, an exchange happened between him and a Westjet customer agent.

http://cellobello.com/blog/index.php...tjets-robert-barron-and-paul-katz/

Excerpt:

Robert Barron:
One lesson perhaps to be learned from this is always to check your airline booking for codeshare and interline flights; these are becoming more and more common, and not all airlines’ policies, allowances, etc., are the same. As Mr Katz learned to his distress, what is allowable on one airline may not be on another. It’s best never to make assumptions, especially when there are any special circumstances such as a disability, special diet – or a musical instrument – are involved.

Paul Katz:
This response, implying I am the problem, infuriates me! In the bewildering world of online purchases and codeshares, does the airline itself have NO responsibility? Why was I able to buy a ticket for a cello on WestJet if you don’t allow them on board? Why should you not program your computers to reject cello tickets? Airlines have programmed their computers to close Frequent Flyer accounts opened in the name of a cello, and yet you allow us to pay for a seat , arrive at the gate, board the plane, an then, after throwing us off, lecture us that we didn’t do proper homework!



From the whole story, I get the feeling the company does not take any responsibility at all.

This brought to the forefront an online petition: Fair treatment for musicians traveling on planes with their instruments

https://www.change.org/petitions/fair-treatment-for-musicians-traveling-on-planes-with-their-instruments

Please, fellow A.netters, take the time to sign this so that my colleagues and me could travel more easily. I also find highly unpleasant to have to give an instrument to send it to the luggage compartment, even though my cello is worth a hundred times (at least) less than Paul Katz', I do feel the same way whenever it happens. Plus, it missed a connection once (in CDG...).

67 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineHPRamper From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4098 posts, RR: 8
Reply 1, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 12305 times:

I've never even seen a booking site or engine that did not specify if the flight was a codeshare. I believe it is policy to list a flight as such. If one books through an agency or lets corporate travel do the booking, then it may be different but Katz himself seems to imply he booked online.

The story seems exaggerated as well. A bumpy takeoff? Does YYC have speed bumps on the runway? If the cello is in a proper case a little turbulence is not going to damage it especially in the manner he seems to be afraid of, as if a little jostle is going to shatter the thing.


User currently offlinephljjs From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 417 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 12279 times:

Sorry, but I really don't have any sympathy for this person.

When purchasing an airline ticket, it's pretty easy to see which carrier is actually operating the flight and whether or not the flight is a code-share of some sort. It's up to the passenger to do his due diligence and research what, if any, policies apply to them, their luggage and any "special items" they may be traveling with. All of that information can easily be obtained on the airlines websites, but the key is to do your homework. Apparently, this person took prior experiences for granted and it bit him in the butt.

I frequently travel with a firearm in my checked luggage. I've never had an issue with any of the different airlines that I've flown. That doesn't mean that I won't have a problem in the future. Most airlines have very similar policies for firearms, but some are different. Before I book a ticket, I do my research and make sure the airline I wish to travel on does indeed accept firearms in checked luggage. I also review their policies on how they need to be packed, what type of bag is required, etc. Sitting down and reading for 5 or 10 minutes can save you a lot of time and trouble when you show up at the ticket counter to check in.


User currently offlinecheeken From Singapore, joined Feb 2010, 82 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 12187 times:

Quoting HPRamper (Reply 1):
The story seems exaggerated as well. A bumpy takeoff? Does YYC have speed bumps on the runway? If the cello is in a proper case a little turbulence is not going to damage it especially in the manner he seems to be afraid of, as if a little jostle is going to shatter the thing.

It's not the turbulence that kills the instrument, (okay it can be the cause if there is) but rather the temperature and the air pressure of the cargo holds that are extremely hostile to instruments, particularly those made of wood (strings/guitars/harps)


User currently offlinekl911 From Czech Republic, joined Jul 2003, 5259 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 12149 times:

Quoting phljjs (Reply 2):
When purchasing an airline ticket, it's pretty easy to see which carrier is actually operating the flight and whether or not the flight is a code-share of some sort. It's up to the passenger to do his due diligence and research what, if any, policies apply to them, their luggage and any "special items" they may be traveling with.

I agree 100%. Unfortunately not everybody is willing to take the time for this, and then afterwards complain.
No excuses, everybody knows how important it is to read the conditions, doesnt matter if its a new tv, microwave or plane ticket.


User currently onlineB727FA From United States of America, joined Jun 2011, 798 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 12114 times:

If you're that important of an artist and have such a valuable instrument, then I think you'd have traveled enough to know how to "know" what you're in for. If you know to buy a ticket for it, then you know how to "find" the rules.

Took me about 3 minutes to find this:
Musical instruments: Although seats may not be purchased for instruments, we will accept small instruments as part of the carry-on baggage allowance. Exceptions may be made for irregular-sized instruments. All instruments must be stowed in the overhead compartment, under the seat or in other approved locations. This is left to the discretion of the cabin crew and Customer Service Agent upon checking flight and baggage loads. Instruments may also be accepted in checked baggage when they are properly packed. Applicable excess baggage fees will apply.
http://www.westjet.com/guest/en/trav...basics/baggage/special-items.shtml

http://www.westjet.com/guest/en/travel/basics/baggage/code-share.shtml
From the AA link:
Musical Instruments
Small musical instruments may be carried onboard the aircraft providing they meet existing carry-on size requirements and fit in the overhead bin or under the seat in front of you. Case dimensions may not exceed 45 dimensional inches (width + length + height), except for guitars which may be brought on board only if they can be safely stowed in an overhead bin or approved stowage location in the cabin.

The instrument is considered the passenger's one allowed carry-on bag. A personal item is allowed in addition to the instrument.



My comments/opinions are my own and are not to be construed as the opinion(s) of my employer.
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6826 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 12025 times:

He says he bought a seat for the cello, what's up with that ?


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlinephljjs From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 417 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 11989 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 6):
He says he bought a seat for the cello, what's up with that ?

I've seen people do that before, however, I don't see how it could be done online since you have to input birth dates, passport numbers, etc. I don't think you can get through the booking process without filling in all the info. He would have input fake information to get it to work.

Ticket agents at the airport and perhaps the call center can complete the booking. I've seen people carrying large musical instruments on US Airways. They had a boarding pass in the name of "A. Cello."

The part of the story where he said he bought the extra seat online made me suspicious of him and his ordeal. If Westjet or AA doesn't allow large musical instruments in the cabin, why would they let you buy a ticket for one?


User currently offlinecanoecarrier From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2843 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 11934 times:

Quoting phljjs (Reply 7):
I've seen people do that before, however, I don't see how it could be done online since you have to input birth dates, passport numbers, etc. I don't think you can get through the booking process without filling in all the info. He would have input fake information to get it to work.

Ticket agents at the airport and perhaps the call center can complete the booking. I've seen people carrying large musical instruments on US Airways. They had a boarding pass in the name of "A. Cello."

I've seen it done two ways, either purchased as an extra seat in the passengers name. As in they bought an empty seat next to them. People without instruments do that sometimes as well. Or, as you mention they'll buy a ticket for "Cello (last name)". You can make up birth dates if you're flying domestically, the TSA isn't going to look for a drivers license for an instrument.

When I worked at the airport we had a regular that flew with his cello quite often. We even had a professional violinist purchase a seat for her violin every time she flew.

I don't have any sympathy for this guy. Cellos are not small instruments and anyone that travels with them frequently should know the rules already or at least know to look them up before you fly.



The beatings will continue until morale improves
User currently offlinestrfyr51 From United States of America, joined Apr 2012, 1328 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 11791 times:
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Quoting HPRamper (Reply 1):

many cellos are nearly Priceless and cannot BE replaced, My take?? INSURE THE Cello to the HILT Make prior arrangements with the airline. DO NOT accept code shares and STAY off Low Rent airlines Because any Reputable airline would allow you to buy a seat so that your Cello or Double Bass might travel Neck Down inside it's case. Ive been on flights with yo yo Ma and Ron Carter and Both of them had their instrument sitting beside them. I'm not sure what airline WOULDNT understand that.


User currently offlineScottishDavie From UK - Scotland, joined Feb 2011, 185 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 11700 times:

Quoting Aesma (Reply 6):
He says he bought a seat for the cello, what's up with that ?

Maybe I'm missing the point but surely the rules quoted in reply 5 are directed towards carrying musical instruments as hand baggage. That's not exactly what this guy was trying to do - he was carrying his cello as an additional fare-paying passenger, so to speak. If he has bought a seat for the cello and it fits securely into that seat where exactly is the problem apart from a lack of common sense and flexibility on the part of Westjet?


User currently onlineB727FA From United States of America, joined Jun 2011, 798 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 11619 times:

I would never travel with it neck down--in ANY kind of case. Still, he should know how to fly with his cello. I live in CVG. How does our world class symphony travel all around the world with their priceless instruments in cargo?


My comments/opinions are my own and are not to be construed as the opinion(s) of my employer.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25843 posts, RR: 22
Reply 12, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 11572 times:

Quoting ScottishDavie (Reply 10):
Quoting Aesma (Reply 6):
He says he bought a seat for the cello, what's up with that ?

Maybe I'm missing the point but surely the rules quoted in reply 5 are directed towards carrying musical instruments as hand baggage. That's not exactly what this guy was trying to do - he was carrying his cello as an additional fare-paying passenger, so to speak. If he has bought a seat for the cello and it fits securely into that seat where exactly is the problem apart from a lack of common sense and flexibility on the part of Westjet?

Because WestJet makes it very clear in their rules, easily found on their website, that they DO NOT sell extra seats for musical instruments. Instruments carried on have to be "small" which certainly doesn't describe a cello.

Westjet also includes the following in the baggage section of their website, followed by links to the baggage rules of all their codeshare partners. Since this passenger was travelling on an AA ticket, not a WS ticket, perhaps AA wasn't as clear in their website. He should then be complaining to AA for selling him a ticket that couldn't be used, not WS.

Code-share baggage info

Travelling with one of our airline partners? Be sure to familiarize yourself with their baggage allowances and fees as they may be different from ours.


[Edited 2012-09-02 13:18:57]

[Edited 2012-09-02 13:19:54]

User currently offlineScottishDavie From UK - Scotland, joined Feb 2011, 185 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 11181 times:

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 12):
Because WestJet makes it very clear in their rules, easily found on their website, that they DO NOT sell extra seats for musical instruments.

Exactly as I said - lack of common sense and flexibility. What does it matter to Westjet whether a seat is occupied by a human being or a musical instrument? They still get paid the same and at least the musical instrument isn't likely to get drunk, become disruptive or fail to comply with cabin crew instructions.  


User currently offlineordjoe From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 728 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 11021 times:

Quoting strfyr51 (Reply 9):
any cellos are nearly Priceless and cannot BE replaced, My take?? INSURE THE Cello to the HILT Make prior arrangements with the airline. DO NOT accept code shares and STAY off Low Rent airlines Because any Reputable airline would allow you to buy a seat so that your Cello or Double Bass might travel Neck Down inside it's case. Ive been on flights with yo yo Ma and Ron Carter and Both of them had their instrument sitting beside them. I'm not sure what airline WOULDNT understand that.

Agreed, I have no sympathy for this jack ass who seems to think the airline will bend to his will due to him being a professional or having a priceless instrument (as a note I do not doubt the instrument costs a ton of money, my sister plays cello and even a crappy one will be 20K and up). When you book codeshare it always says under it "operated by XYZ" he did not due his dilligence.
He seems like one of the many who think the airline will make exceptions or try to pull the "do you know who I am." He could have booked a connecting flight on AA or whomever's metal to ensure it stayed in the passenger cabin.


User currently offlineGoodbye From Australia, joined Jan 2001, 913 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 11008 times:

To be fair, most average people when they're booking a flight on an airline's website expect to be flying with that airline. 90% of people wouldn't have a clue what a "codeshare" is nor what it means for them.

One of my friends is travelling in the US at the moment, he didn't know what airline he was flying there on (from Australia!), nor what airline he was travelling around the US on ("whatever the travel agent booked for me"), so the fact that this gentleman wasn't aware his flight was operated by WestJet isn't that hard to understand.


User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7851 posts, RR: 19
Reply 16, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 10973 times:

Quoting ScottishDavie (Reply 13):
Exactly as I said - lack of common sense and flexibility. What does it matter to Westjet whether a seat is occupied by a human being or a musical instrument? They still get paid the same and at least the musical instrument isn't likely to get drunk, become disruptive or fail to comply with cabin crew instructions.

true but can you securely use a seatbelt to strap a cello in?

When I bring my guitars on board, I usually ask the F/As to put the guitar behind the last First Class seat if there's no room in the overhead. If I'm in first class, the F/As usually put it above my seat. But then again it's a guitar, not a cello  



我思うゆえに我あり。(Jap. 'I think, therefore I am.')
User currently offlineOOSLC From United States of America, joined Nov 2008, 173 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 10687 times:

How did he make it all the way to his seat with a huge cello without a single agent at WS seeing it!?!?! It would have been less of a blow if an agent saw it during check in. Surely two boarding passes popped out of the machine. When the agent asked him for his passport, I'm surprised he/she didn't catch that there was no passport for the cello. Seems fishy to me.

User currently onlinenitepilot79 From Turkey, joined May 2008, 292 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 10687 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 16):
true but can you securely use a seatbelt to strap a cello in?

Only if you "B#" enough. If not, then one has to "C" it to "B" leave it   



En Buyuk Turkiye, Baska Buyuk Yok!
User currently onlinetrex8 From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 4833 posts, RR: 14
Reply 19, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 10551 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 16):
true but can you securely use a seatbelt to strap a cello in?

Yes

My daughter is a cellist, she has a $3000 air travel case for checking it in but its so heavy if she goes somewhere where she has to carry it around a lot - say she is going to a music camp as opposed to just doing a performance, she gets another seat for it and uses a lightweight case you can carry on your back. She usually flies UA and getting a E+ bulkhead seat guarantees no problems. Its not allowed in exit rows. She has managed to fit it in a regular coach seat but it seems to vary with type of plane/seat- also sometimes it will stop the person in front from reclining completely. FAs are usually very good about accommodating her. We had one issue recently with DL, she was using grandparents freq flier miles as she was going to ATL so figured there must be so many flights and they can't all be completely full. I called DL and spent over an hour twice trying to get a bulkhead seat- they won't release till day of flight and people with medical issues get first dibs at it, they ("supervisors" ) also claimed there would be zero issues with a regular seat and it fitting and they "absolutely knew it would be fine in a regular seat" and there were specified seat locations for such instruments in the cabin but no one could tell me exactly which seat on a MD80 this was! I think they didn't know the size difference between a guitar and a cello! They were wrong about it fitting but fortunately the flight wasn't full so it manged to fit at an angle for 2 seats. Maybe when they have economy comfort on all DL flights it won't be an issue as it would be like UA E+ space wise. WN has moved people from bulkhead seats to allow her cello to get in there.

You can book another seat for an instrument on line very easily on every airline we have tried. TSA doesn't ask to see the id to certify the birth date or sex when you bring it up to them, in fact they usually don't even check its got its own boarding pass, thats only important for the gate agent, FAs. She usually books it as surname, cello instrument

Some research and preparation helps but it also helps if the airline have a clue! Some don't.

She called UA Mileage Plus once to ask if she could get an account for the cello, they said that would not be appropriate!  


User currently offlineOB1504 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 3433 posts, RR: 6
Reply 20, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 10476 times:

Quoting HPRamper (Reply 1):
I've never even seen a booking site or engine that did not specify if the flight was a codeshare. I believe it is policy to list a flight as such.

Indeed, I believe a company would be opening itself up to fines from the DOT if it did not disclose codeshare flights.

Quoting canoecarrier (Reply 8):
I've seen it done two ways, either purchased as an extra seat in the passengers name. As in they bought an empty seat next to them.

This is how I've usually seen it done, and the customer was then issued two boarding passes for himself/herself and the instrument. I can't recall if had to go on the floor (the bottom of the case) or could be in the seat, though.


User currently offlinePROSA From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5644 posts, RR: 4
Reply 21, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 10457 times:

If the cello is worth millions of dollars, why wasn't it shipped using an armed courier service?


"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
User currently onlinenitepilot79 From Turkey, joined May 2008, 292 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 10338 times:

Quoting OB1504 (Reply 20):
This is how I've usually seen it done, and the customer was then issued two boarding passes for himself/herself and the instrument.

I've never felt the need to name any of my musical instruments until now!



En Buyuk Turkiye, Baska Buyuk Yok!
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21795 posts, RR: 55
Reply 23, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 8722 times:

Quoting PROSA (Reply 21):
If the cello is worth millions of dollars, why wasn't it shipped using an armed courier service?

You don't realize how much (or should I say how little) musicians make, do you? That's not going to be financially possible.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineHPRamper From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4098 posts, RR: 8
Reply 24, posted (2 years 2 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 8243 times:

Quoting Mir (Reply 23):
You don't realize how much (or should I say how little) musicians make, do you? That's not going to be financially possible.

Hmm, then how could said individual have acquired a multimillion dollar instrument? Charitable gesture?


25 Mir : Some instruments are loaned, but most are purchased. Doesn't mean they have a lot of disposable income hanging around to spend on armed escorts for i
26 jetjack74 : Honestly, are we to believe that the world should stop for this guy, because he CHOOSES to cart around some sort of "sacred relic of string instrument
27 BN747DFWHNL : Few thoughts from a professional musician and plane geek: 1) WestJet's policy makes zero sense. It is common practice to allow cellists to buy a seat
28 cheeken : They don't. For instruments too big to be carried, they rent it at their destination, and for celli, they put them in flight cases, or most of the ti
29 Post contains links jetjack74 : How about leaving it at home and taking a less-expensive cello? This is what I would do with it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=749iU2Zv1kw[Edited 20
30 PanHAM : because you don't give it to people who might shoot holes into the Cello. LOL - some answers here are unbelievable An instrument made in 1669 is pric
31 UALWN : Do photographers leave their top camera and lenses home and then work with worse equipment? Do they put their expensive equipment in their check-in l
32 Post contains images keegd76 : Flying Geese Airlines - We'll get you where you need to go, provided its on our annual migration route Reminds me of an incident I had a few years ba
33 jetjack74 : Camera equipment is alot more portable than a cello or a tuba .And on that subject? Yes. I had Nat Geo videographers/photographers, journalists on my
34 PanHAM : Camera equipment, regardless what the price is, can be replaced. If it is sinsured above the liability limit, the owner gets a full refund and can bu
35 UALWN : Hence the need for an extra seat. At the owner's expense. What's the big deal? This is how guitars, violins and such are transported. Particularly, v
36 cheeken : The difference between journalists given the privilege of having proper protection provided by the company. Musicians have these things called flight
37 Fabo : Can we now agree that it is equal part: -WestJet fault for not telling him sooner (at checkin?) and/or for not making one time exception -AA fault for
38 FI642 : Last month I let UA take my roll aboard (which they really banged up, BTW) rather than give ip my camera. When I worked for NW we had a musician that
39 B727FA : That's my point, they DO check items and they are just fine.
40 trex8 : The million $ instruments are rarely owned by the performer, unless you literally are YoYo Ma. Often large institutions own it but lend it to top perf
41 Post contains images AM744 : Why? Is it unsafe to carry a cello in the passenger cabin? Exactly. I'm puzzled by this. Isn't the whole point of code shares to sort of deceive the
42 B727FA : Don't ask me. I was quoting WestJet's rule. I see them in the cabin all the time.
43 AS739BSI : If it couldn't be secured to the seat and the aircraft hits a good chunk of turbulence and the instrument is heavy. That could be enough to injure a
44 canoecarrier : Just making an educated guess that the policy may have started with the airline asking themselves "what is the largest instrument that can be brought
45 Fabo : canoecarrier, this guy paid for the seat. Its not like he is trying to bypass bag charge. FWIW if you bought a seat for your oversized bag, I guess yo
46 Fly2yyz : Hmm, just thinking about this topic. A cello is fairly wide, add to that its travel case and its fairly a tight squeeze into a row's window seat where
47 canoecarrier : I think you missed my point. Whether or not you pay for an extra seat for any item, and an item can be an instrument, boat or car part, or whatever,
48 seven3seven : Funny, I linked a website last year to protest rising airline taxes but that thread was killed. The moderators said they don't allow such threads. App
49 Aesma : I still don't understand how he could buy a seat for the cello. As an aside when I was younger and less savvy, I came back from a vacation at an aunt
50 trex8 : Its done regularly on probably every airline except Westjet! The first time I did it by phone I thought I'd be in for lots of questions, there were n
51 silentbob : There have been a number of studies that have proven that people can't distinguish the sound of a stradavarius from an off the rack violin. Many of t
52 PHX787 : Well how about what an overweight person has to do in order to fit into a seat? he buys 2 seats!
53 cheeken : And airlines wouldn't sell extra seats for those items if they were too big. Celli are understood by most airlines as small enough to be strapped dow
54 BN747DFWHNL : No. It is wholly the airlines' (collective) faults because they've purposely set it up to make it seem like it's American Airlines the whole trip. If
55 Post contains images n729pa : I tried to take an out of tune violin on a flight once, but I was told I wasn't allowed an "A sharp instrument" on a plane
56 YYZatcboy : Or If American wants to Code Share on WestJet flights then they need to have the same policies as WestJet because that's what passengers are expectin
57 Aircellist : So much ignorance in this thread... Glad to see there is not only ignorance. Salute to colleagues and music lovers (even those that may not agree with
58 BN747dfwhnl : [quote=YYZatcboy,reply=56]If American wants to Code Share on WestJet flights then they need to have the same policies as WestJet because that's what p
59 YYZatcboy : You obviously did not get that it was a joke. Sorry for the typos, I was at work and having a rather bad migraine. The point however still stands. If
60 slcdeltarumd11 : I almost always see the passengers side and think the airlines are often unrealistic and wrong but this time i totally side with the airline. AA doesn
61 Fabo : I specifically said, quote here: I would expect being able to secure an items includes both it being in a correct shape to be able to be strapped in,
62 longhauler : This is the biggest point. Westjet has chosen not to allow seat-load baggage, and thus it is not in their OC. When allowing it, Transport Canada also
63 strfyr51 : My question is?? Did he get refund for the second SEAT??
64 Aesma : It's my understanding that you have to go through a few hoops to do just that.
65 Post contains images PHX787 : If you can fit through the hoop
66 BN747dfwhnl : Ok, so let's see what we have: Got it: according to you, WestJet most likely didn't train its employee carefully enough but this somehow absolves them
67 JONC777 : There is no faa exemption for musical instruments period. end of story. If they do not fit in the sizing box. . .they should be checked. Any gate agen
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