Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Singapore Airlines Orange Stripe  
User currently offlinemusang From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2001, 861 posts, RR: 7
Posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 15745 times:

Good Day All.

For a webzine article I've been asked to contribute to on SQ's history (40th anniversary and all that), does anyone have any info on the design of SQ's initial colour scheme, and the thinking behind the updated version?

I believe Landor did the original as well as the revision, and I'm waiting for some info from them, but for now:-

(a) did the bird logo actually relate to anything Singaporean, or was it simply a stylised bird and nothing more?

(b) was the choice of navy blue and yellow significant, or just because it was not a common combination in airline colour schemes back then?

(c) in the current scheme (and its minor variations like the enlarged bird logo) I can appreciate the "graduation" from yellow to gold, but what is the significance of the orange stripes?

And on a sort of related topic, most of SQ's aircraft type nicknames (Jubilee, Big Top etc.) are self explanatory but what was the significance of "Celestar"?

And regarding the 727 fleet, these were reputedly nicknamed "Advanced 727" but was this simply a reversal of the Boeing variant name "727 Advanced"? Was Advanced 727 ever painted on an aircraft? I was there when the first was delivered and for a while afterwards, "Boeing 727" appeared on the no. 2 intake, and the only other variation I saw was "California here we come", promoting the start of transpacific service. In advertising SQ referred to the type as the "Hightail", but this name never appeared on the aircraft either.

Any thoughts much appreciated!

Many thanks - regards - musang

31 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSInGAPORE_AIR From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2000, 13738 posts, RR: 19
Reply 1, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 15441 times:

I only know the answer to your point 1 - it is a stylised bird as you rightly pointed out.


Anyone can fly, only the best Soar.
User currently onlinen729pa From UK - England, joined Jan 2011, 391 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 15429 times:

Originally of course they were Malaysia Singapore Airlines


According to Wilkipedia "The initials MSA were well regarded as an airline icon and both carriers tried to emulate them. Malaysian went for MAS by just transposing the last two letters and choosing the name Malaysian Airline System, whereas Singapore originally proposed the name Mercury Singapore Airlines to keep the MSA initials, but changed its mind and went for SIA instead. Acronyms for airline names later reduced in fashion and both carriers then moved on to their descriptive names" (from the history of Malaysia-Singapore Airlines)

So I suspect this is where the blue and yellow came from, from the MSA association.

"When Malaya, Singapore, Sabah and Sarawak formed the Federation of Malaysia in 1963, the airline's name was changed, from "Malayan Airways" to "Malaysian Airlines" (though still abbreviated to MAS). MAS also took over Borneo Airways. In 1966, following Singapore's separation from the federation, the airline's name was changed again, to Malaysia-Singapore Airlines (MSA). " (from the History of Malaysia Airlines)

I believe the bird is called the Silver Kris, (why silver I don't know) but apparently a kris is a form a south east asian dagger, highly prized and often passed down through generations. But Kris is also known to be a spiritual object, often considered to have a presence or considered to possess magical powers. Kris are used for display, as talismans with magical powers. So perhaps it is this mythical background the bird turns to. You may need to check a bit deeper into that.

Hope this may be of some little help

[Edited 2012-09-11 10:24:33]

User currently offlinemotorhussy From New Zealand, joined Mar 2000, 3139 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 15385 times:

Quoting SInGAPORE_AIR (Reply 1):
it is a stylised bird as you rightly pointed out.

While stylised it is, it is very much so in the Chinese artistic oeuvre which reflects to me a strong aspect of Singapore.



come visit the south pacific
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 24884 posts, RR: 46
Reply 4, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 15225 times:

In this photo the 727 is clearly painted with "Boeing 727 Advanced" titles on the #2 engine intake.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/51778986@N07/4771805410/

However I would not be surprised if in marketing the plane was indeed named as Advanced 727. There simply is often a disconnect between the marketing folks and the technical reality.

Lots of history with SQ and the varied classic fleet of aircraft it operated -- 737-100/200, 727, A300, DC-10 plus interesting stories of how it ordered both the 757 and A310 at the same time to "try out" both, and how it also ordered but never received the MD-11 and going with the A340 later, but then how Boeing bought back the A340-300 fleet to secure the initial 777 order.

On older aircraft nicknames I know of the following -- A310 recevied the "3TEN" monkier. A300 was the "Superbus".


Good luck on the story.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineTreeHillRavens From Malaysia, joined Jun 2007, 394 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 15102 times:

Quoting n729pa (Reply 2):

I believe the bird is called the Silver Kris, (why silver I don't know) but apparently a kris is a form a south east asian dagger, highly prized and often passed down through generations. But Kris is also known to be a spiritual object, often considered to have a presence or considered to possess magical powers. Kris are used for display, as talismans with magical powers. So perhaps it is this mythical background the bird turns to. You may need to check a bit deeper into that.

Kris came from the Malay/Indonesian word Keris.


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24906 posts, RR: 22
Reply 6, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 15030 times:

Quoting LAXintl (Reply 4):
In this photo the 727 is clearly painted with "Boeing 727 Advanced" titles on the #2 engine intake.

SQ must have been one of the very few carriers that did that, considering that about 75% of the 727-200s built were the Advanced model (deliveries from June 1972 onwards).


User currently offlinemandala499 From Indonesia, joined Aug 2001, 6769 posts, RR: 76
Reply 7, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 14702 times:

Quoting musang (Thread starter):
(b) was the choice of navy blue and yellow significant, or just because it was not a common combination in airline colour schemes back then?

Came from MSA using yellow and black/very dark blue... which came from the Malaysian flag on the crescent and star on the blue background.

Quoting musang (Thread starter):
And on a sort of related topic, most of SQ's aircraft type nicknames (Jubilee, Big Top etc.) are self explanatory but what was the significance of "Celestar"?

A343s were originally planned for SQ's longest routes, and I suspect followed Airbus' marketing for long and thin routes... reminiscent of the old days of celestial navigation... but of course, I'm just making this part up !   

Quoting musang (Thread starter):
And regarding the 727 fleet, these were reputedly nicknamed "Advanced 727" but was this simply a reversal of the Boeing variant name "727 Advanced"? Was Advanced 727 ever painted on an aircraft?

The 727s originally didn't have the "Advanced" writing on the tail engine intake... as evident here (Coincidentally, with the "California here we come"):

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © David Eyre


These then had the "727 Advanced" writing on the intake... not "Advanced 727"...

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Steve King
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Stefan Martin

Quoting musang (Thread starter):
In advertising SQ referred to the type as the "Hightail", but this name never appeared on the aircraft either.

Back then, SQ didn't paint the aircraft nicknames on the aircraft. That practice came with the introduction of the 747-300, to distinguish it from the 747-200 as well as for marketing purposes... (just like UTA did refer to their 747-300s as "Big Boss") But yes, the A310-200s did have the 3TEN writing early on, but this disappeared once they went to the new livery, and none of the A310-300s have them.

I guess they didn't want to call the A380 the Gigatop so they stopped the nickname practice.   

Mandala499



When losing situational awareness, pray Cumulus Granitus isn't nearby !
User currently offlinechangyou From Singapore, joined Nov 2003, 269 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 14620 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting SInGAPORE_AIR (Reply 1):
believe the bird is called the Silver Kris, (why silver I don't know) but apparently a kris is a form a south east asian dagger, highly prized and often passed down through generations. But Kris is also known to be a spiritual object, often considered to have a presence or considered to possess magical powers. Kris are used for display, as talismans with magical powers. So perhaps it is this mythical background the bird turns to. You may need to check a bit deeper into that.

Hope this may be of some little help

Birds are used for airlines logos and SQ was no different then but the shape of the Golden Bird is actually the handle of the "Keris" which symbolises sacred and power.


User currently offlineaviasian From Singapore, joined Jan 2001, 1486 posts, RR: 14
Reply 9, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 14467 times:

The MD-11 was never ordered and SIA's interest in it only went as far as the Letter of Intent (LOI) that was signed. It was consequently the LOI that was cancelled when McDonnell Douglas failed to fix a problem with the aircraft performance over time (I understand this to be linked to the deterioration of engine performance over time). This SIA feared would impact negatively on the aircraft's ability to operate SIN-CDG nonstop year-round.

Good luck with the article and I hope that when it is published, you will also publicise it here on A.net.

Should you need pictures of some memorabilia - MD-11 sticker in SIA livery, gifts from Boeing marking delivery of first B772 and from Airbus marking delivery of first A333 etc, please feel free to message me directly.

KC Sim
Singapore


User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 605 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 13914 times:

Quoting n729pa (Reply 2):
...whereas Singapore originally proposed the name Mercury Singapore Airlines to keep the MSA initials, but changed its mind and went for SIA instead.

That's because MAS demanded that SG pay them a fat royalty to use the MSA initial which they argued was partially owned by them. SG of course refused and SIA was born.
SIA incidentally stands for Singapore Airlines and not Singapore International Airlines as was then erroneously widely believed.



Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
User currently offlineinfinit From Singapore, joined Jul 2008, 548 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 12619 times:

Quoting motorhussy (Reply 3):
While stylised it is, it is very much so in the Chinese artistic oeuvre which reflects to me a strong aspect of Singapore.

I doubt it. And that's not quite right. Singapore being right in between Malaysia and Indonesia, has its linguistic roots in the South East Asian family of languages. Although English is a first language here now, Malay was the first language back in the 60s and the proportion of new immigrants from China was much lower back then too. Even though a lot of the present population has ethnic Chinese roots, Singapore never had much of a Chinese influence- in art, culture or outlook.

I think the popular belief, like Changyou pointed out,is that it was made look like a handle of Keris, the symbolic and almost mythical weapon of the folklore from this region. I think that answers Musang's first question.

Quoting changyou (Reply 8):
Birds are used for airlines logos and SQ was no different then but the shape of the Golden Bird is actually the handle of the "Keris" which symbolises sacred and power.
Quoting mandala499 (Reply 7):
Came from MSA using yellow and black/very dark blue... which came from the Malaysian flag on the crescent and star on the blue background.

Exactly what I thought. A great deal of influence on SQ and Singapore, quite predictably, must have come from Malaysia. For example, the official Coat of Arms you find on coins with the words "Majulah Singapore" (Onward Singapore in Malay). The lion symbolises Singapore while the tiger symbolises our historic links with Malaysia-
http://app.www.sg/who/44/National-Coat-of-Arms.aspx

Quoting neutrino (Reply 10):
That's because MAS demanded that SG pay them a fat royalty to use the MSA initial which they argued was partially owned by them. SG of course refused and SIA was born.

Thank goodness for that! Mercury Singapore Air sounds real cheesy! 


User currently offlinemusang From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2001, 861 posts, RR: 7
Reply 12, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 10892 times:

Indeed.

I remember at the time (I lived there) the justification was that Mercury was the Roman god of travel, merchants, and trade. He got around with the help of his winged sandals. This seemed reasonable as an inspiration for an airline name. Also, there was a statue of Mercury atop the frontage of Robinson's department store in Raffles Place, which allowed SQ to claim a link, albeit tenuous, with Singapore. (Robinson's burned down, and the replacement store was in prime position on the main shopping street, Orchard Road).

I never associated the bird logo with the handle of a kris, even though I was familiar with the knife. Thanks for that Changyou.

Thanks All, for the contributions. Still no explanation for the orange stripe??

Regards - musang


User currently offlineEPA001 From Netherlands, joined Sep 2006, 4705 posts, RR: 38
Reply 13, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 10866 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting mandala499 (Reply 7):
Quoting musang (Thread starter):
And on a sort of related topic, most of SQ's aircraft type nicknames (Jubilee, Big Top etc.) are self explanatory but what was the significance of "Celestar"?

A343s were originally planned for SQ's longest routes, and I suspect followed Airbus' marketing for long and thin routes... reminiscent of the old days of celestial navigation... but of course, I'm just making this part up !   

Your explanation, even if you made it up, still sounds plausible to me!  


User currently offlineCoal From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 2005 posts, RR: 9
Reply 14, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 9542 times:

Quoting n729pa (Reply 2):
I believe the bird is called the Silver Kris

  

Not even close! (But good try). The Kris is an ancient Malay knife, sort of like a dagger. The reason it is silver is because Malaysia (of which Singapore used to be part of) has a long tradition of silverwork and silverware.

The bird is a golden crane, btw.

Cheers
Coal



Nxt Flts: VA SYD-CBR-SYD | VA SYD-OOL-SYD | JQ SYD-MEL | VA MEL-CBR-SYD | DL SYD-LAX-ATL-MIA | B6 FLL-DCA-BOS | DL BOS-L
User currently offlineLHRBFSTrident From UK - Northern Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 655 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 6852 times:

Quoting EPA001 (Reply 13):
Quoting mandala499 (Reply 7):
Quoting musang (Thread starter):
And on a sort of related topic, most of SQ's aircraft type nicknames (Jubilee, Big Top etc.) are self explanatory but what was the significance of "Celestar"?

A343s were originally planned for SQ's longest routes, and I suspect followed Airbus' marketing for long and thin routes... reminiscent of the old days of celestial navigation... but of course, I'm just making this part up !   

Your explanation, even if you made it up, still sounds plausible to me!  

I like that too!

Additionally, I always thought it was some kind reference to Singapore's original airport before Changi, Seletar.



Next up: LAX-LHR NZ002 Y SkyCouch! LHR-LAX NZ001 Y
User currently onlinen729pa From UK - England, joined Jan 2011, 391 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 6373 times:

Quoting Coal (Reply 14):
Not even close! (But good try).

I'm glad it gave you a chuckle, a lighter hearted thread is always more interesting than one where everyone gets a bit hot under the collar about a subject.

I knew a Kris was some form of knife, but I was reading the history of SIA on wilkipedia and it said something on there about the bird being called the Silver Kris ...which I couldn't figure why a) it was called silver and clearly yellow and b) why a bird would be associated with a knife or dagger. And what was the significance of SilverKris with SIA using it as the title of their inflight magazine and lounges etc. Didn't make a lot of sense, then again there was also a reference to mythical powers etc which could be perhaps associated to the bird/crane etc. I know you should take wilkipedia with some caution.

http://www.silverkris.com/about-us

"SILVERKRIS is named after the kris, a Malay weapon used in the 14th century. Legend has it that the kris possessed many qualities, the greatest of which was its ability to anticipate danger and protect its owner. The kris was treated with the utmost respect and often became a family heirloom. Today, its function is purely ceremonial. In choosing a kris made of silver as the symbol of our service, we acknowledge both the quality and reputation of Malay silverware and our roots in Malayan Airways, which began in 1947"

Quoting changyou (Reply 8):
Birds are used for airlines logos and SQ was no different then but the shape of the Golden Bird is actually the handle of the "Keris" which symbolises sacred and power.

I like it anyway, and its one of those instantly recognisible logos a bit like the JAL crane or Qantas Roo.


User currently offlinedynkrisolo From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 1861 posts, RR: 7
Reply 17, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 6287 times:

Quoting LHRBFSTrident (Reply 15):
Additionally, I always thought it was some kind reference to Singapore's original airport before Changi, Seletar.

Not even close.   It was Paya Lebar.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paya_Lebar_Air_Base


User currently offlineLHRBFSTrident From UK - Northern Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 655 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 6201 times:

Quoting dynkrisolo (Reply 17):
Not even close.   It was Paya Lebar.

Given the size of Singapore it probably is geographically 'close'...  

Ok, ok, before Changi and before Paya Lebar (were there any others?) there was an airfield in Singapore called 'Seletar' - perhaps it was even the first serving the city state as it was inaugurated in 1928...  



Next up: LAX-LHR NZ002 Y SkyCouch! LHR-LAX NZ001 Y
User currently offlineAngMoh From Singapore, joined Nov 2011, 479 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 6025 times:

Quoting LHRBFSTrident (Reply 18):
Ok, ok, before Changi and before Paya Lebar (were there any others?) there was an airfield in Singapore called 'Seletar' - perhaps it was even the first serving the city state as it was inaugurated in 1928...

Before Paya Labar the main airport was Kallang airport.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kallang_Airport

Seletar Airport was mainly for private aviation, MRO activities and Berjaya Air used to have flights from here to holiday resorts nearby.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seletar_Airport

Currently there is a huge development going on. The jewel in the crown now is the RR Trent 1000 factory, but this is also the place were ST Aerospace does (767) freighter conversions and I think this is the place where they will start A330 P2F conversions and P&W just opened a repair facility at the Seletar Aerospace Park.


User currently offlineinfinit From Singapore, joined Jul 2008, 548 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 5850 times:

LHRBFSTrident is right on Seletar being the first official one actually. So the airports used for commercial aviation in Singapore were:

1. Seletar (1928 to 1937; thereafter it was used as an airbase till 1971; now it's used for private jets)
1. Kallang (1937 to 1955; defunct thereafter)
2. Paya Lebar (1955 to 1980)
3. Changi (1981 to present)

Kallang however is often referred to as the first commercial airport here. I'm not sure why. Perhaps there weren't any commercial flights regularly serving Seletar in its first ten years? Does anyone have any information on this?

While Kallang is defunct now, the control tower is still standing. Interestingly, the adjacent metro station there is called Dakota in memory of the 1946 Dakota air crash near the airport.


User currently offlinehuaiwei From Singapore, joined Oct 2008, 1113 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 5776 times:

Quoting infinit (Reply 11):
I doubt it. And that's not quite right. Singapore being right in between Malaysia and Indonesia, has its linguistic roots in the South East Asian family of languages. Although English is a first language here now, Malay was the first language back in the 60s and the proportion of new immigrants from China was much lower back then too. Even though a lot of the present population has ethnic Chinese roots, Singapore never had much of a Chinese influence- in art, culture or outlook.

While I agree, I don't think this presentation of Singapore's social and linguisic makeup is entirely accurate.

- Back in the 1960s, ethnic Chinese already constiute over 70% of our population, in fact more so than today.
- Malay is not the "first language" in the 1960s, unless you are in a Madrasah. Chinese and English were taught as first languages in the schools depending on the primary language used as a medium of instruction. You are probably referring to Baba Malay, which was the unofficial lingua franca here, but it has not really led to major cultural influences besides forming the backdrop behind which Singlish was born.
- The Chinese influence in Singapore is much more prevalant than described, and is obvious in almost all aspects of Singaporean life.

Quoting infinit (Reply 20):

Kallang however is often referred to as the first commercial airport here. I'm not sure why. Perhaps there weren't any commercial flights regularly serving Seletar in its first ten years? Does anyone have any information on this?

Perhaps because Seletar was built primariy as a military installation before serving commercial aircraft in 1930?

Quoting musang (Reply 12):
I never associated the bird logo with the handle of a kris, even though I was familiar with the knife. Thanks for that Changyou.

Neither have I. Is this an official interpretation?



It's huaiwei...not huawei. I have nothing to do with the PRC! :)
User currently offlineZKSUJ From New Zealand, joined May 2004, 7089 posts, RR: 12
Reply 22, posted (1 year 10 months 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 5692 times:

I always like the name Celestar. Thought it was the only name SQ gave an aircraft type with some meaning. I thought it was named as it was the unsung hero (Centre Star) of the SQ fleet serving thinner routes which the 744s were to big for (Before 777s were widely used on long haul)

User currently offlineneutrino From Singapore, joined May 2012, 605 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 5302 times:

Quoting dynkrisolo (Reply 17):
It was Paya Lebar.
Quoting AngMoh (Reply 19):
Before Paya Labar the main airport was Kallang airport.
Quoting infinit (Reply 20):
LHRBFSTrident is right on Seletar being the first official one actually. So the airports used for commercial aviation in Singapore were:

1. Seletar (1928 to 1937; thereafter it was used as an airbase till 1971; now it's used for private jets)
1. Kallang (1937 to 1955; defunct thereafter)
2. Paya Lebar (1955 to 1980)
3. Changi (1981 to present)
Finally, the answer that is truest.   


Though Kallang was Singapore's first purpose-built civil airport, Seletar before it had been functioning as the then British colony's official international airport.
As asides, Changi like Seletar, also started life as a military airbase, and is still being (partially) utilised by the military today. The originally civil Paya Lebar is now fully military.



Potestatem obscuri lateris nescitis
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24906 posts, RR: 22
Reply 24, posted (1 year 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 5233 times:

Quoting infinit (Reply 20):
Kallang (1937 to 1955; defunct thereafter)

Malayan Airways DC-3 and BOAC Canadair C-4 Argonaut at Kallang 1950.

http://202.172.178.226/DJVUServer/getImage.jsp?file=/picas_data/tn_pcd/19980001356-8151-3231-2014/img0112.jpg

Quoting infinit (Reply 20):
Paya Lebar (1955 to 1980)

MSA 737-100 after arrival at Paya Lebar on delivery flight August 1969.

http://202.172.178.226/DJVUServer/getImage.jsp?file=/picas_data/tn_pcd/PCD0360-EA16-11F2-3F10/img0035.jpg


SQ 737-100 (ex-MSA) at Paya Labar sometime between 1972 (when MSA was split into MH and SQ) and 1979/80 when all 5 SQ 731s went to Air Florida.



25 musang : Although there is a civil maintenance/overhaul facility there on what was the west apron. Thanks all contributors. Learned a lot about my former home
26 VC10er : Hi, I am an Executive Creative Director at LANDOR and perhaps I can help. I was not with LANDOR when Walter Landor created the "Singapore" brand ( I w
27 Post contains images neutrino : I live a couple of km up the road from there, passing by its now disused maingate guardpost every so often and yet not up to date on its operations.
28 Post contains links 777way : Landor and current scheme inspired creation. http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a40/techsavy/jal5.png
29 VC10er : Better! But JAL should be one of the best in the sky. Heck, nothing is more beautiful than Japanese design, it permeates their culture. One would thi
30 ycp81 : "Celestar", if i remembered correctly, is the combination of the words "celestial" and "star". A new celestial aircraft, a star among the fleet.
31 Post contains images huaiwei : It depends on how you define Sembawang's boundaries. Based on URA's boundaries, the entirety of the Sembawang Air Base is actually outside, but adjac
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Singapore Airlines Cargo Flying To Khartoum? posted Sun Jul 8 2012 10:32:51 by 777way
Singapore Airlines Final 747 Flights posted Wed Feb 22 2012 20:03:19 by AA94
Singapore Airlines Tribute To The B747 posted Thu Feb 16 2012 18:35:29 by 9V-SPJ
Singapore Airlines History In NZ (question) posted Sat Nov 26 2011 23:05:43 by 28L28L
SAS In Collaboration With Singapore Airlines? posted Sun Nov 20 2011 13:00:26 by Mortyman
Singapore Airlines Firms (8) 77W posted Thu Nov 17 2011 12:44:03 by boeingfever777
Singapore Airlines JFK posted Wed Sep 14 2011 06:21:42 by planetime
Singapore Airlines May Sell Virgin Atlantic Stake. posted Sat Jan 1 2011 06:41:04 by virginson937
Singapore Airlines A380 To LAX From 27 Mar 2011 posted Fri Dec 3 2010 07:47:55 by Docpepz
Singapore Airlines To Sao Paulo... posted Tue Nov 16 2010 06:15:38 by Flyfirst