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Anatomy Of An Airliner Crash  
User currently offlineirelayer From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1073 posts, RR: 2
Posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 7056 times:

Just read this article that details an intentional airliner crash and explains what happens.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel...-tv-show-stages-727-crash/1606749/

Pretty interesting, if a bit scary.

-IR

16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineLonghornmaniac From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 3278 posts, RR: 45
Reply 1, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 6954 times:

Very cool. I'll definitely make sure to set my DVR.

Cheers,
Cameron


User currently offlinesciurusmdg From Argentina, joined Apr 2012, 60 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 6944 times:

Quoting irelayer (Thread starter):

Don't think it's that scary... Quite the opposite, it's reassuring. Shows that the majority of crashes are survivable, and reinforces what we all know - IE. Wear a seatbelt, brace, and know where the exits are.


User currently offlinecbphoto From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1551 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 6929 times:

I had to ask, but does anyone know what the reg of that 727 was? By the pics in the article, it appeared to be an ex-Champion Air bird!


ETOPS: Engines Turning or Passengers Swimming
User currently offlineirelayer From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 1073 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 6825 times:

Quoting sciurusmdg (Reply 2):
Don't think it's that scary... Quite the opposite, it's reassuring. Shows that the majority of crashes are survivable, and reinforces what we all know - IE. Wear a seatbelt, brace, and know where the exits are.

I guess I meant it's scary to think about being in this situation...but yes you are right, it's definitely reassuring to know that something like this is survivable.

-IR


User currently offlineRyDawg82 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 858 posts, RR: 8
Reply 5, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 6785 times:

Quoting cbphoto (Reply 3):

I had to ask, but does anyone know what the reg of that 727 was?

Here's what I was able to find, the aircraft at time of crash was registered XB-MNP (msn 21348). The aircraft was delivered to Singapore Airlines as 9V-SGB on September 26, 1977. The also flew with VASP (PP-SMK) and Alaska Airlines (N293AS). Later it flew for Express One, AvAtlantic and Sterling One. It served Champion Air (N293AS) and was operated their final revenue flight on May 29, 2008.

Ryan



You can take the pup out of Alaska, but you can't take the Alaska out of the pup.
User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4951 posts, RR: 19
Reply 6, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 6723 times:

I remember those Champion Air birds coming into HOU. They were always sparking clean!


Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlineRubberJungle From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 6286 times:

This story started kicking around in April. This is a Flightglobal article written at the time, which might be interesting to some of you:

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/art...y-crashed-in-desert-for-tv-371267/


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24868 posts, RR: 22
Reply 8, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 5683 times:

Quoting RyDawg82 (Reply 5):
Quoting cbphoto (Reply 3):

I had to ask, but does anyone know what the reg of that 727 was?

Here's what I was able to find, the aircraft at time of crash was registered XB-MNP (msn 21348). The aircraft was delivered to Singapore Airlines as 9V-SGB on September 26, 1977. The also flew with VASP (PP-SMK) and Alaska Airlines (N293AS). Later it flew for Express One, AvAtlantic and Sterling One. It served Champion Air (N293AS) and was operated their final revenue flight on May 29, 2008.

With 3 of its operators.


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Photo © David Eyre
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Photo © Johan Ljungdahl


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Photo © Art Brett - Photovation Images



User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12128 posts, RR: 51
Reply 9, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 5618 times:

I've seen the commericals for this on Discovery. I am definetly going to watch it. I remember this B-727-200ADV Champion Air, N293AS. She was a frequent visitor while I worked at DFW.

User currently offlinercair1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2009, 1308 posts, RR: 52
Reply 10, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 5370 times:
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I hope the show is better than the USA Today article (pretty hard NOT to beat a USA Today article). They talk about 'powering down the wing engines' then the center one (this was in a video I think). last time I looked, a 727 had no 'wing' engines. There were two or three other gaffs.


rcair1
User currently offlineTbone354 From United States of America, joined Sep 2010, 76 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 4634 times:
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Deja vu? I recall some outfit crashing a 707 or maybe it was a 720 many years ago. That poor thing wound up in a fiery twisted mass of molten metal. Why would it take months to "plan" a plane crash? I am no expert, having never crashed one but it seems pretty straight forward to me. Would not take a rocket surgeon or brain scientist to do that. I'll bet that my cat could crash a plane with one eye closed. We all like to see things that are not supposed to happen so I will watch this too.

User currently offlineYYZYYT From Canada, joined Apr 2005, 947 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 4023 times:

Quoting Tbone354 (Reply 11):
Deja vu? I recall some outfit crashing a 707 or maybe it was a 720 many years ago. That poor thing wound up in a fiery twisted mass of molten metal. Why would it take months to "plan" a plane crash? I am no expert, having never crashed one but it seems pretty straight forward to me. Would not take a rocket surgeon or brain scientist to do that. I'll bet that my cat could crash a plane with one eye closed. We all like to see things that are not supposed to happen so I will watch this too

Seriously? I have no doubt that if you removed the pilots and locked your cat in the cockpit of 727 while in flight, a crash would be inevitable... but that misses the point.

Of course it would take months to set this up, buying the plane, arranging the chase plane, cameras, dummies, sensors, remote piloting, getting approvals and television contracts lined up (not to mention insurance!!), pilots, experts, etc, and then remotely flying the 727 into the ground at a pre-detemrined slope. Hardly easy.

As for the 720, that was an FAA test of a fuel additive that was supposed to prevent the fuel from igniting (in 1984 - see the "operatrional history" section of the wiki page for the 720)... Didn't exactly work out as planned

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_720

.

[Edited 2012-10-03 18:55:03]

[Edited 2012-10-03 18:57:48]

User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24868 posts, RR: 22
Reply 13, posted (1 year 9 months 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 3911 times:

Quoting Tbone354 (Reply 11):
Deja vu? I recall some outfit crashing a 707 or maybe it was a 720 many years ago. That poor thing wound up in a fiery twisted mass of molten metal.

It was the FAA's 720, crashed by NASA in 1984 in a test of a fuel additive to reduce explosions. It didn't work.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=feQxYXHXewY&feature=endscreen
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=Je3yqY3l-ls
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70qZXKg_s3M

The 720-027 was built for Braniff but cancelled before delivery and acquired by the FAA in 1961.


View Large View Medium
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Photo © Marcus Anderholm




There was another crash test involving an ex-UA DC-7 in 1963.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHZY0-XUmMA

Longer version.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrIZd53Gl4E

An ex-TWA L-1649A Starliner was also crash-tested at the same location as the DC-7 in 1964.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTJ07V1QcZ4


User currently offlineSSTeve From United States of America, joined Dec 2011, 695 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2523 times:

I just watched this on DVR. Thought it was amazing that one of the engines continued to run after the nose of the plane sheared off! However I suppose the rear of the plane was pretty damn intact. >12G up front versus <6G in back.

[Edited 2012-10-09 22:18:37]

User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4951 posts, RR: 19
Reply 15, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2340 times:

The show was OK but had too many elements of a "reality" show. Way too many commercials, rather slow moving and too much sensationalism. I watched it from my DVR and hopped the commercials. If I had watched this show in real time I would have been pissed! I think the actual show was 90 minutes with 30 minutes of commercials.


Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlineTSS From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 3066 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2251 times:

Quoting SSTeve (Reply 14):
However I suppose the rear of the plane was pretty damn intact. >12G up front versus

I was left wondering how different the crash results might have been if they had used an aircraft with a more modern layout, specifically one with it's engines under the wings and without a T-tail. I suspect the strong rearward weight bias of the unladen 727 along with it's more robust aft structure to support all three engines might have made a significant difference versus, say, a 734 or 738.



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