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Is The UA Computer Switchover 100% Fixed Yet?  
User currently offlineVC10er From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 2866 posts, RR: 10
Posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 5626 times:
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As someone who flies United often, I was very effected by the switchover, and it was far from fun to live through. I know a lot has been done to fix the problems and things have certainly improved. But still there are things that United can't do yet, or maybe never will be able to do that the premerger United could do? It still feels like it's not quite a whiz of a system.

My question is to people close to this...is the computer situation all fixed now or is there still more work to be done? And in what areas?

It does seem like all the computer complaints in the press have disappeared and now replaced by the remarkable return to good on-time performance. Or has AA's cancellations and loose seats now replaced UA in the news?


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40 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineusairways85 From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 3387 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 5614 times:

They are far from fixed. While improvements have been made and there are fewer major issues I still face little annoyances every day.

They just put a new front end on SHARES so it may be easier for the GA's to use but it is still the same back end with existing bugs.


User currently offlineazstar From United States of America, joined May 2005, 617 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 5593 times:

It isn't so much as the system being fixed, as it is an inferior system.

User currently offlineLOWS From Austria, joined Oct 2011, 1113 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 5415 times:

When I was flying back to SZG in August, the UA agents in OKC were having an awful time trying to get 60 people rebooked to DEN after the CR7 went tech.

Is there a plan to migrate to a completely new system at some point?


User currently offlineVC10er From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 2866 posts, RR: 10
Reply 4, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 5365 times:
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Quoting azstar (Reply 2):

So the world's "leading" airline with over 1500 aircraft, 6000 flights a day, largest route network... is stuck with an inferior computer system? Great!

So, are there intentions to address the core "inferior" system? Or will there be just Band-Ads for years to come?



The world is missing love, let's use our flights to spread it!
User currently offlineazstar From United States of America, joined May 2005, 617 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 5340 times:

Here's a couple things I learned over the past couple months. When there is an "irregular operation" like a lengthy delay or flight cancellation, it might take you three flights to get to your destination instead of your original two. Most airline computer systems will allow for that with a few keystrokes. However, UA Shares system will not. If you had two flights originally and now you need three, the agents can't do it. They have to call a "help desk" , wait on line, and they wil fix it so you can get your boarding passes.I was flying Phoenix/Newark/Burlington, Vt. My PHX-EWR flight was two hours late, so they rerouted me PHX-DEN-EWR-BTV. By the time the agent was done, it was 15 minutes. It should have taken 3 minutes, or less.

Another example. Since I'm "Platinum" on UA, I can change flight without paying a fee. I wanted to change to an earlier flight, but it was full, so they waitlisted me and I waited at the gate for a seat. The agent told me that by the time they could give me a seat, the only seat available was emergency exit. That was fine with me, but the agent said that the system will not assign an emergency exit to a standby passenger, and they can't do it manually. They have to switch some other passenger already checked in to the emer exit, then assign their seat to me, then switch us both back to our original seats. So, what should take 30 seconds takes 3 minutes or more. If you have several passengers with the same issue, it can actually delay a flight! Crazy.

[Edited 2012-10-06 10:57:00]

User currently offlineCoairman From United States of America, joined Dec 2010, 116 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5287 times:

As a regular and extremely proficient user of shares, the system is much more stabile now versus when the changeover occurred on March 3rd. The system sort of went through a "shock" period when the changeover occurred. Much like when you go through Surgery. Back when the changeover occurred some very irregular and weird things occurred while working with shares. Now shares seems to be operating normally and stabile.

As the PMUA agents become more proficient with shares as every day passes, the customers will notice less service issues and better customer service. It takes time to become proficient.

Just remember, Continental Agents didn't have many problems with shares prior to March 3rd, as indicated by Continental's overall positive customer service reputation. Shares is a whole language of its own that you really can't learn without doing studying, have notes nearby and doing the entries in a repetitive way.

There are some irritating characteristics of shares as mentioned above when rerouting a customer from 2 legs to three legs which require a reissue by a specialist. Another irritating thing is when clearing revenue and non-revenue standbys, the system tends to assign the worst possible seat on the seat map and not assign passengers in the same pnr seats together or as close together as possible.

Overall I think shares is a good and stabile system, but I have been using it a long time. It takes a while to become confident and proficient in shares and that is unfortunately part of the growing pains both the customers and the agents have been experiencing. I feel bad for the PMUA agents who had to learn a whole new system. Basically all of them were like new hire agents even though they had in some cases over 30 years of airline customer service experience.

[Edited 2012-10-06 11:09:55]

[Edited 2012-10-06 11:23:25]

[Edited 2012-10-06 11:57:44]


Patience Can Be A Virtue.
User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4948 posts, RR: 19
Reply 7, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5246 times:

This may have been asked before, but I never saw this question posed before.

Why did UA switch from Apollo to SHARES in the first place? Since UA was bigger you would think at merger time the majority of the employees would be trained on it.



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlineCoairman From United States of America, joined Dec 2010, 116 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5227 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 7):

I think one of the main reasons for using Shares was because it was much more cost effective and much more superior regarding integrating shares with mobile technologies such as viewing current standby lists, seat maps, upgrade lists, flight information including where the equipment is coming from and amenities on your mobile device. Just check out: mobile.united.com and the Apple United App for awesome various information. I use the the App for performing my job duties, providing good customer service when I don't have shares available to use.

[Edited 2012-10-06 11:32:30]

[Edited 2012-10-06 11:38:33]

[Edited 2012-10-06 12:30:59]


Patience Can Be A Virtue.
User currently offlineazstar From United States of America, joined May 2005, 617 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5193 times:

Quoting type-rated (Reply 7):
Why did UA switch from Apollo to SHARES in the first place? Since UA was bigger you would think at merger time the majority of the employees would be trained on it.

I heard the reason for the change was that CO owned Shares. UA did not own Apollo (the previous system) so, as
stated in previous post, it was much more cost effective to switch to Shares.

[Edited 2012-10-06 11:45:58]

User currently offlinekgaiflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 4238 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days ago) and read 5103 times:
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Quoting azstar (Reply 5):
I wanted to change to an earlier flight, but it was full, so they wait-listed me and I waited at the gate for a seat. The agent told me that by the time they could give me a seat, the only seat available was emergency exit. That was fine with me, but the agent said that the system will not assign an emergency exit to a standby passenger, and they can't do it manually. They have to switch some other passenger already checked in to the emer exit, then assign their seat to me, then switch us both back to our original seats. So, what should take 30 seconds takes 3 minutes or more. If you have several passengers with the same issue, it can actually delay a flight! Crazy.
Quoting azstar (Reply 5):
I learned over the past couple months. When there is an "irregular operation" like a lengthy delay or flight cancellation, it might take you three flights to get to your destination instead of your original two. Most airline computer systems will allow for that with a few keystrokes. However, UA Shares system will not. If you had two flights originally and now you need three, the agents can't do it. They have to call a "help desk" , wait on line, and they wil fix it so you can get your boarding passes.I was flying Phoenix/Newark/Burlington, Vt. My PHX-EWR flight was two hours late, so they rerouted me PHX-DEN-EWR-BTV. By the time the agent was done, it was 15 minutes. It should have taken 3 minutes, or less.
Quoting VC10er (Reply 4):
So the world's "leading" airline with over 1500 aircraft, 6000 flights a day, largest route network... is stuck with an inferior computer system?

From the above description of service characteristics, it sure looks that way (at least to another 1-K who flies other airlines).


User currently offlineUnited1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5930 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 4 days ago) and read 5075 times:

Quoting azstar (Reply 9):
I heard the reason for the change was that CO owned Shares. UA did not own Apollo (the previous system) so, as
stated in previous post, it was much more cost effective to switch to Shares.

CO used to own SHARES, UA used to own Apollo (they created it in 1971 and spun it off in 1992)... HP owns SHARES currently. Supposedly switching to SHARES saves UA 10's of million of dollars a year vs switching the airline to Apollo. I think a few years after the dust settles on the merger you will see UA switch to an entirely different, and modern, reservation system.

Quoting kgaiflyer (Reply 10):
From the above description of service characteristics, it sure looks that way (at least to another 1-K who flies other airlines).

Allot of those issues should be taken care of by the overlay program that UA started pushing out on the 1st of October. Eventually it should function allot like UAs former FasrAir/FastRes overlay on Apollo which will make the GA/CS jobs much much easier and faster.



Semper Fi - PowerPoint makes us stupid.
User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 883 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 5018 times:

Quoting LOWS (Reply 3):
Is there a plan to migrate to a completely new system at some point?

No current plan to move to a new res system.

Quoting type-rated (Reply 7):
Why did UA switch from Apollo to SHARES in the first place? Since UA was bigger you would think at merger time the majority of the employees would be trained on it.

The big factor was money, since sCO retained certain rights to SHARES after the EDS selloff, but the sCO way of doing things was also more flexible and did more work on modern servers. sUA did almost everything inside Apollo on the mainframe, while sCO did lots on modern server hardware that then batched to SHARES. This allowed sCO to develop mobile applications and website features in house, while sUA would have needed to pay Apollo to develop the same features. The big drawback of the move to SHARES for gate agents and airport staff was the loss of FastAir and the fact the reservations must now match tickets with a PNR sync. At first everyone at the airport was using the green screen interface for SHARES but I've heard they are rolling out a new GUI now

I have heard so many complaints about the move to SHARES but honestly we would have been hearing about other problems if you moved all the sCO staff and reservations to Apollo. Neither system was perfect. In the end there were downsides with both systems and the new UA chose to reduce costs and go with the platform they can develop themselves without a third party.


User currently offlineazstar From United States of America, joined May 2005, 617 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 5009 times:

Quoting United1 (Reply 11):
Allot of those issues should be taken care of by the overlay program that UA started pushing out on the 1st of October. Eventually it should function allot like UAs former FasrAir/FastRes overlay on Apollo which will make the GA/CS jobs much much easier and faster.

I'm sure you're referring to a GUI (Graphic User Interface). However, that still runs over the basic computer system. If the basic system has certain limitations, the GUI will not resolve that. You will not be able to do anything that the computer system itself cannot do.


User currently offlineUnited1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5930 posts, RR: 9
Reply 14, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 4971 times:

Quoting azstar (Reply 13):
I'm sure you're referring to a GUI (Graphic User Interface). However, that still runs over the basic computer system. If the basic system has certain limitations, the GUI will not resolve that. You will not be able to do anything that the computer system itself cannot do.

Absolutely agreed.... there are certain things that Apollo would allow the GA/CS agent to do that SHARES simply will not...those particular bits of functionality are gone and wont be coming back. What the new overlay (GUI) will do is speed up the process and make the system easier to use. It's basically laying a windows type interface over a green screen...it is much easier and faster to click a few icons then it is to type a series of commands into SHARES in order to make the system do what you want it to. FasrAir/FastRes worked in the exact same way overlaying Apollo and making it much easier to use.

It will, and has already from what I have been hearing, cut the amount of time that it takes to re-book a customer and some of the other time consuming/help desk calling tasks that the GA/CS agents are required to do every day.

[Edited 2012-10-06 14:18:51]


Semper Fi - PowerPoint makes us stupid.
User currently offlinenws2002 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 883 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 4954 times:

Quoting azstar (Reply 13):
I'm sure you're referring to a GUI (Graphic User Interface). However, that still runs over the basic computer system. If the basic system has certain limitations, the GUI will not resolve that. You will not be able to do anything that the computer system itself cannot do.

The issue with SHARES is that it can take several lines of text to complete a single function. With a GUI a single click can type those several lines. A GUI can also allow airport agents to work with more than one reservation at a time by having multiple instances of the text entry running in the background.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19404 posts, RR: 58
Reply 16, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 4935 times:

Quoting Coairman (Reply 6):
Just remember, Continental Agents didn't have many problems with shares prior to March 3rd, as indicated by Continental's overall positive customer service reputation. Shares is a whole language of its own that you really can't learn without doing studying, have notes nearby and doing the entries in a repetitive way.

There are some irritating characteristics of shares as mentioned above when rerouting a customer from 2 legs to three legs which require a reissue by a specialist. Another irritating thing is when clearing revenue and non-revenue standbys, the system tends to assign the worst possible seat on the seat map and not assign passengers in the same pnr seats together or as close together as possible.

By definition, this is a poorly-designed system. The system should work smoothly. It should involve a minimum number of situations in which users have to "get around" an inscrutable UI or some necessary, yet absent function.

I don't have experience with airline management software, but I do with EMR's, which are also large corporate IT system investments. One of these specialized business program either works smoothly, is intuitive, and is functional... or it isn't.


User currently offlinerobo65 From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 169 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 4475 times:

Quoting azstar (Reply 5):

This is not true regarding the seat and not being able to assign to a standby customer. Once you are cleared off the standby list you can be assigned any seat including an exit row seat.

As a couple people have mentioned in this topic, prior to the merger the Continental agents had little or no problem with irregular operations and rerouting customers, even if it was from 2 segments to 3. It is a simple sync entry in shares. Yes there were probably times that a former agent may have had to call the help desk but not often.

Shares was a system that was previously owned by Continental but sold to HP and Comtinental was given very favorable rates with HP. You have to remember that FastAir the United system was only an application that fit over Apollo, so Apollo was still the operating system. Continental also had an application called EZR for airport agents and QuickRes for reservations. Reservations used there system exclusively however the airport EZR system was really never fully developed be ause after 9/11 Continental stopped updating EZR. However their were some agents that were hired during this time frame and were trained on EZR and still used it at the airport. The older agents though continued to use shares and it worked for them.

We're the frustration came in was the UA agents were put through a 3 week training class on shares and then on March 3 the cutover date had to use shares for checkin and were very frustrated because like someone quoted here earlier they were like new hires even though most of them had quite a few years. I can see why some were frustrated however no matter how much the wanted there FastAir back and hated shares the company decided to go with shares and so either just had issues because it was foreign to them, however I did see some people that just didn't want to accept it. The company told them that they were working on a new application system to go over shares. The new system is called checkit and is up and running. The ticket counter agents for the most part are using it however the gates are still mostly using shares. The system is still being tweaked and there are updates coming out frequently.

So in response not only to the highlighted comment above like it or not shares is here to stay and the checkit app is functioning now with updates frequently. For the most part most of the agents are ok with it, however you still have a few that just don't want to except change. That doesn't mean in the future that United will find a different system that is created be someone and switch but for now the agents just have to use shares with checkit.


User currently offlinegigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 18, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 4304 times:

Ugh.

Shares is fine. Its basically just a database, the commands you execute are extensible almost in an unlimited fashion - Continental just didn't have a procedure to do everything United did, and the United agents don't always know the native commands to do everything that they need to do.

The new front ends automate 85% of the tasks - vs 0% - and give the sUA agents the ability to do things with one click that they never even learned in SHARES.

There is going to be an all new, integrated front end that should cover 100% of the use cases in 2013. Sure, it speaks the SHARES SOA language, but so what? HP still develops for SHARES, its improving constantly - its the UA deployment of it that needs a little revamping.

United is building an all new centralized datacenter and its likely that, as part of that new infrastructure (god knows you can't even buy what they run SHARES on now), they will improve the underlying platform.

NS


User currently onlineBEG2IAH From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 940 posts, RR: 17
Reply 19, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 4095 times:
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Quoting robo65 (Reply 17):
the UA agents were put through a 3 week training class on shares and then on March 3 the cutover date had to use shares for checkin and were very frustrated because like someone quoted here earlier they were like new hires even though most of them had quite a few years

This is so typical of today's workforce when you make people change the way "they have been doing things since the dinosaurs". This switch sUA agents went through reminded me of a mayhem that my company faced when we switched from MS Office 2003 to Office 2007. Interface was (very) different, but it's not rocket science. People were screwing around during training sessions, which were made available, but kept bitching, and in the end the IT dept. pushed a cheat menu of old 2003 commands. The same logic obviously had to be applied in what gigneil described...

Quoting gigneil (Reply 18):
There is going to be an all new, integrated front end that should cover 100% of the use cases in 2013

This whole "problem" just tells me that sUA agents did not learn what they were supposed to. sUA agents were not learning (did they really want to or was it so hard?) and new UA gave in and created a dumbed down interface.



FAA killed the purpose of my old signature: Use of approved electronic devices is now permitted.
User currently offlinecosyr From United States of America, joined Jul 2012, 372 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 4064 times:

As someone who works at a bank, We have 3 levels of GUI's that mask the all powerful HOGAN, that many banks use. We have a new system on the way, which is supposed to combine everything using HOGAN in the background, but it better be good, as the previous systems have been around nearly 20 years.

I just cannot imagine the intricacies of trying to design and replace these systems. If it works, don't mess with it.


User currently offlineUnited1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5930 posts, RR: 9
Reply 21, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3999 times:

Quoting BEG2IAH (Reply 19):
his whole "problem" just tells me that sUA agents did not learn what they were supposed to. sUA agents were not learning (did they really want to or was it so hard?) and new UA gave in and created a dumbed down interface.

I'd say its pretty hard to switch from Windows to DOS....that's basically what they asked the sUA agents to do. UA initially planned on rolling out a GUI called FastSHARES (modeled off UAs FastRes/FastAir which was the GUI that sat ontop of Apollo) however they discovered that they were not going to be able to make it work in time for the cutover. Rather then delay the cutover they trained everyone in SHARES and while SHARES is a very versatile program it's very difficult for an end user to go from point and click back to typing in commands on a green screen.

UA has started to rectify that issue with the new GUI overlay that they rolled out on the 1st of October...IIRC they plan on pushing out new versions of the program every month or two with additional functions as they build twords the new front end.



Semper Fi - PowerPoint makes us stupid.
User currently offlinekgaiflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 4238 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3351 times:
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Quoting BEG2IAH (Reply 19):
This whole "problem" just tells me that sUA agents did not learn what they were supposed to. sUA agents were not learning (did they really want to or was it so hard?) and new UA gave in and created a dumbed down interface.
Quoting United1 (Reply 21):
Rather then delay the cutover they trained everyone in SHARES and while SHARES is a very versatile program it's very difficult for an end user to go from point and click back to typing in commands on a green screen.

On the other hand, I remember my first real computer -- a 'Kaypro 1' using CP/M. With no GUI's available at the time, I remember making ten keystrokes just to change drives. In terms of today's technology, that's ridiculous, unless you want to deliberately make useless busywork for workers for no apparent reason -- except that it's good for them -- lose your best personnel, and lose business.

The argument that sUA agents simply don't want to learn a new trick -- for whatever reason -- doesn't hold.


User currently offlineVC10er From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 2866 posts, RR: 10
Reply 23, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 3119 times:
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United last month has returned to over 80% on-time performance since dropping to last. Can we all attribute this to these fixes?


The world is missing love, let's use our flights to spread it!
User currently offlinequiet1 From Thailand, joined Apr 2010, 351 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3025 times:

I may have the month wrong, but the cut over to SHARES at sUA was rushed because their contract with Apollo was expiring/due for renewal in April. Ideally, sUA would have continued using Apollo until the GUI overlay for SHARES was available, but rather than extend the Apollo contract for another year, they saved money and pushed through the changeover in March. It appears that this month (or last?) the first phase of the SHARES GUI was finally rolled out, with later phases due to automate more SHARES functions.

Another issue for sUA at the March cut over was the difference in philosophies/procedures between sUA and sCO that came to light. Apparently, at sUA with Apollo the gate agents had much more direct control over all aspects of the check-in/close-out process, whereas at sCO headquarters managed some of the "final hour" functions. While sUA agents were used to just doing certain things, they now had to send them to Houston and/or wait for them to be handled. A similar philosophy/procedure culture difference existed in reservations offices. e.g. Apollo would automatically ticket PNRs almost immediately, whereas SHARES queues them up to some backroom office where they usually are processed at some later time unless the res agent elevates a request to a supervisor or help desk on an individual PNR basis. Lots of little differences exist that each on their own don't sound like much, but when all added up, required not only a paradigm shift for sUA CSRs/RSRs but also patience from the frequent fliers who were accustomed to having things done in a certain way and in a certain time frame.

IMHO, the main shortcoming of using SHARES for the combined new UA is that it was designed, and worked well for, a much smaller sCO operation. e.g. Just the fact that sCO only had two hubs (IAH, EWR) -- okay 2.5 hubs if you count CLE -- that fact made rebooking irrops much simpler than at UA with multiple hubs with many more re-routing options.


25 beachbum1970 : Does anyone on the sCO side know why this wasn't done years ago to SHARES, to help the CO agents work more quickly and efficiently? You would think C
26 BEG2IAH : They failed miserably at using SHARES and waited for an easier solution instead of exerting some effort. They either couldn't learn (ability constrai
27 azstar : Funny. The person who gave me the information I posted was a 20 + year CO veteran.
28 nws2002 : The phone agents have always had a GUI for SHARES. The airport staff used to have something, I think it was called EZ-R. However, the airport GUI was
29 airtechy : Did Northwest and Delta have the same res system pre-merger or did they go through the same problems?
30 United1 : They were on the same system.
31 FriendlySkies : This implies that the average sUA gate or reservation agent is adept at quickly picking up a coding language, which likely means they have had formal
32 Post contains links BNAtraveler : They were on the same platform, but it was definitely not the same system. Both Delta and Northwest were hosted within Worldspan, but the two underly
33 BEG2IAH : sCO agents apparently do it on a daily basis, so I don't understand why sUA agents cannot. Didn't someone mention 2-3 week training sUA agents went t
34 airtechy : Thanks for the info. Quite interesting!
35 FriendlySkies : Yes, and those sCO agents were trained on it when they were hired, not on the job after using a different system for 20+ years. Like I said, I'm not
36 kgaiflyer : Literally, you are saying sUA gate agents are failures because they cannot write / rewrite code. Is that a correct assessment of what you are saying?
37 quiet1 : I don't think I've ever heard/read that the sUA agents went through 2-3 weeks of training. Where did you see/hear that?
38 EaglePower83 : The SHARES boosters can defend this terrible system all you want....but as a long time customer I will tell you I do not give a darn. As a 7 year freq
39 BEG2IAH : That's a fair statement. They were undertrained, but definitely it's not impossible to learn the new system as some posters implicitly suggested. You
40 777ord : Yes, practically all airline reservations systems in the US are old, slow and require countless hours of training.... Having used both SABRE with AA,
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