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Why Did EI Purchase The 747?  
User currently offlineei737ng From Ireland, joined Feb 2007, 48 posts, RR: 0
Posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 22100 times:

Just wondering why EI purchased the 747 considering Ireland's population size how did the fleet planners ever hope to fill them? A case of fleet misplanners?

96 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinetonystan From Ireland, joined Jan 2006, 1414 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 22030 times:

Like most things at the time you will discover that the 747 purchase was driven by politics and vanity. It was not an aircraft EI needed nor could they ever operate it efficiently. The aircraft spent much of their time farmed away on contract to other carriers.

The A330 basically saved Aer Lingus in my opinion!



My views are my own and do not reflect any other person or organisation.
User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3587 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 21955 times:

Quoting tonystan (Reply 1):
Like most things at the time you will discover that the 747 purchase was driven by politics and vanity.

Yup. The "everyone else has it so I should, too" mentality.

But, have no fear, they weren't the only ones. History is littered with others who did the same...TP comes to mind with their 747-200's.

Did EI's 747's fly to BOS at all?



I sell airplanes and airplane accessories
User currently offlineSCL767 From Chile, joined Feb 2006, 8757 posts, RR: 5
Reply 3, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 21933 times:
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Quoting tonystan (Reply 1):
The aircraft spent much of their time farmed away on contract to other carriers.

LAN Chile was one carrier that leased the 747 from EI.

EI-BED at SCL:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Luis Calvo Fly-News



User currently offlinekaitak From Ireland, joined Aug 1999, 12411 posts, RR: 37
Reply 4, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 21600 times:

Quoting tonystan (Reply 1):
The aircraft spent much of their time farmed away on contract to other carriers.

They certainly spent quite a lot of their time with other carriers; indeed, one of their managers responsible for fleet leasing was a gentleman by the name of Tony Ryan, who went on to lead GPA. No one ever heard from him again!  
Quoting tonystan (Reply 1):
The A330 basically saved Aer Lingus in my opinion!

In fairness, the A330 was - and indeed remains - a superb aircraft for Aer Lingus.

Quoting Airportugal310 (Reply 2):
Did EI's 747's fly to BOS at all?

Absolutely, right up until it retired; indeed, it also operated to ORD via BOS for a while (I did that as a pax, DUB-SNN-BOS-ORD ... wow, that was a trip and a half!)

Joking apart, the 747 did serve EI quite well; ok, at the outset, everyone got them because it was the optimism of the 1960s and fuel was cheap. Almost as soon as they got them, the world economy was going south and then there was the fuel crisis of the '70s and of course, the troubles in Northern Ireland and for a long time, EI was only operating one of them. That said, by the late '70s, EI had acquired a third aircraft - LH's third -100, which became EI-BED - and they were operating reasonably successfully with them, never VERY profitably, but certainly lifting quite a good number of pax. One of the 747s, EI-BED, was operated in a 468 seat all-Y class layout, and they certainly filled them.

Towards the end, they became quite difficult to maintain and what really caused a problem was the Shannon stopover policy, which added a lot of costs, not just in fuel, but also in pressure cycles; it was for a long time the shortest 747 flight in the world and was done in about 25 minutes. In the end, the then Executive Chairman of EI, Bernie Cahill, went to the then transport minister, Brian Cowen, and told him that if the country wanted to have continued t/a services, that had to change. It was, and the airline ordered A330s and sadly, the old 747s were retired.

I think it's fair to say that they were much loved and much missed by everyone who had anything to do with them - passengers and crews alike. Yeah, the A330 was more modern, all singing and all dancing, but they never could match the presence of the 747. They'll always be fresh in the memory.

Here's a nice little video, narrated by the airline's senior 747 captain of the time, the late Aidan Quigley:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1E-iMDMz8HM

... and here's a few gratuitous pictures:

In original colours ...

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Steve Williams



In the 1970s-80s Aer Lingus livery:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Fergal Goodman


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Fergal Goodman



and finally, alas, cruel fate:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ian Tate



User currently offlineBasilFawlty From Netherlands, joined Jun 2009, 1316 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 21309 times:

Quoting ei737ng (Thread starter):
Just wondering why EI purchased the 747 considering Ireland's population size how did the fleet planners ever hope to fill them? A case of fleet misplanners?

More a case of prestige, like most airlines in that era.



'Every year donkeys and mules kill more people than plane crashes'
User currently offlineAmricanShamrok From Ireland, joined May 2008, 2873 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 21103 times:

Quoting Airportugal310 (Reply 2):
Did EI's 747's fly to BOS at all?
Quoting kaitak (Reply 4):
Absolutely, right up until it retired; indeed, it also operated to ORD via BOS for a while (I did that as a pax, DUB-SNN-BOS-ORD ... wow, that was a trip and a half!)

Yes indeed, my first ever flights were the SNN-BOS-ORD runs on the 747. The flight numbers were EI123/EI122.



Shannon-Chicago
User currently offlinemilesrich From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1993 posts, RR: 6
Reply 7, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 20944 times:

EI at least has a trans Atlantic route to operate them on. National, Eastern, Continental, and Delta all operated the 747-100, and ordered them for competitive reasons.

User currently offlinetype-rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4961 posts, RR: 19
Reply 8, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 20877 times:

In 1970 it was very much a prestige thing to have the 747 in your fleet. Airlines advertised the arrival of their own months before they took delivery. It was truly a matter of pride.

I remember in the early 70's seeing a British Airways, Aer Lingus and Pan Am 747 at ORD at the old international terminal (Where Terminal 1 now sits) all in a row. It was a very impressive sight.

At the time Aer Lingus used to advertise package deals where you start your European vacation in Ireland and then see the other countries after that.



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlinejetjack74 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 7405 posts, RR: 50
Reply 9, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 20620 times:
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Quoting Airportugal310 (Reply 2):
But, have no fear, they weren't the only ones. History is littered with others who did the same...TP comes to mind with their 747-200's.

Or like Emirates?



Made from jets!
User currently offlineFI642 From Monaco, joined Mar 2005, 1079 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 19062 times:

Quoting tonystan (Reply 1):
The A330 basically saved Aer Lingus in my opinion!

I could not agree more!



737MAX, Cool Planes for the Worlds Coolest Airline.
User currently offlineAirportugal310 From Palau, joined Apr 2004, 3587 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 18836 times:

Quoting jetjack74 (Reply 9):
Or like Emirates?

Interesting...did not know they had 747's...but then again, I only know of Emirates in the 2000's and not their previous history



I sell airplanes and airplane accessories
User currently offlineBreninTW From Taiwan, joined Jul 2006, 1612 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 18810 times:

Quoting Airportugal310 (Reply 11):
Interesting...did not know they had 747's...but then again, I only know of Emirates in the 2000's and not their previous history

It appears they haven't ... at least not in PAX use, there are four 744F in Emirates livery.

http://www.airfleets.net/flottecie/Emirates.htm



I'm tired of the A vs. B sniping. Neither make planes that shed wings randomly!
User currently offlinetonymctigue From Ireland, joined Feb 2006, 1944 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 18765 times:
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Quoting Airportugal310 (Reply 2):
Did EI's 747's fly to BOS at all?

They most certainly did! My love of aviation comes from flying EI B747s from SNN to BOS. They were an impressive sight and most certainly are sorely missed. As much as they were loved, I will be the first to admity they were too much aircraft for EI definitely at the time they had them. That said, it is easy to judge a decision made in the 1960s based on 21st centuary economics. Fuel was cheap and government owned flag carriers like EI were seen as mobile advertising for the country whom they served and it was very much a case of everyone had to have the biggest and the best and in that time, the B747 was without a doubt the biggest and the best.



Next Flights: 27/06/14 CX 178 MEL-HKG; 28/06/14 CX 830 HKG-JFK; 04/07/14 EI 134 BOS-SNN
User currently offlinetymnbalewne From Bermuda, joined Mar 2005, 946 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 18527 times:

Anyone remember the dramatic opening scenes of "White Nights"? (with Mikhail Baryshnikov and Gregory Hines)




Dewmanair...begins with Dew
User currently offlinefactsonly From Montserrat, joined Aug 2012, 818 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 18022 times:

In 1974 EI leased one of their B747 to East African Airways for a one weekly rotation LHR-FRA-NBO-FRA-LHR during the peak holiday winter season.

My first B747 flight was on the second operation on 20 December 1974 routing LHR-FRA-NBO.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ae...ways_Boeing_747-100_Fitzgerald.jpg


User currently offlineaerorobnz From Rwanda, joined Feb 2001, 7172 posts, RR: 13
Reply 16, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 17895 times:

Luxair had 747SP, Air New Zealand, Air Pacific the 742.All of which are tiny populations like Ireland or smaller.

User currently offlineJalap From Belgium, joined Oct 2007, 355 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 17324 times:

Quoting BasilFawlty (Reply 5):
More a case of prestige, like most airlines in that era.

That is often the answer, but wasn't the 747 also the most efficient long haul plane at the time? How did the seat per mile cost compare to the DC10 and L1011? Several airlines, like EI, operated their 'prestige' planes for decades, so surely they played a usefull role with those airlines.

Surely prestige played a role too but then again, prestige probably sold seats in those days. While nowadays the aviation industry has little to do with prestige....


User currently offlinewinstonlegthigh From United States of America, joined Nov 2012, 119 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 16802 times:

Quoting Jalap (Reply 17):
That is often the answer, but wasn't the 747 also the most efficient long haul plane at the time? How did the seat per mile cost compare to the DC10 and L1011? Several airlines, like EI, operated their 'prestige' planes for decades, so surely they played a usefull role with those airlines.

Surely prestige played a role too but then again, prestige probably sold seats in those days. While nowadays the aviation industry has little to do with prestige....

Ain't that the truth... Often times, it seems that this is overlooked.



Never has gravity been so uplifting.
User currently offlinedergay From Ireland, joined Dec 2006, 44 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 15028 times:

Quoting tonystan (Reply 1):
The A330 basically saved Aer Lingus in my opinion!

Don't forget the fact that Aer Lingus also operated a brace of Boeing 767s prior (methinks) to the introduction of the A-330.



Flown on A300,A310,A318,A319,A320,A321,A330,B707,B720,B727,B737,B747,B757,B767,L382,L1011,C5,DC-3,DC8,
User currently offlinethijs1984 From Netherlands, joined Mar 2007, 100 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 14917 times:

Quoting aerorobnz (Reply 16):
Luxair had 747SP, Air New Zealand, Air Pacific the 742.All of which are tiny populations like Ireland or smaller.

In case of Luxair. the Cathment area of Luxembourg airport is much bigger than luxembourg itself.

And in case of air Pacific, it's the only good connection to the outside world. Unlike ireland which has very good short haul flight options to many big cities and many ferry connections.


User currently offlineairbazar From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 8237 posts, RR: 10
Reply 21, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 14502 times:

Quoting Airportugal310 (Reply 2):
But, have no fear, they weren't the only ones. History is littered with others who did the same...TP comes to mind with their 747-200's.

Not true. When TP ordered the 747 in 1970, they were very much needed. Unlike EI, TP actually flew their 747's and they needed the capacity and the cargo uplift because the 707's just weren't enough. The colonies generated a huge amount of traffic. The problem came later following the revolution in 1975 when Portugal lost its colonies.


User currently offlinegeorgiaame From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 959 posts, RR: 6
Reply 22, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 14318 times:

One of my first post college trips to Europe as a working (semi-) adult, was on EI 747 service, JFK-SHA-DUB, return via SHA (still qualifying for the $199 rt. youth fare offered). Granted it was a few years ago, but both flights were fully booked. Perhaps they were the only EI 747 flights that were, Had a lovely introduction to Irish butter on board. There was a woman behind me flying back home with her 8, yes 8, very young children. Perhaps if there were more like her flying, EI would still be in need of 747s today.


"Trust, but verify!" An old Russian proverb, quoted often by a modern American hero
User currently offlinejfk777 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 8289 posts, RR: 7
Reply 23, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 12988 times:
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Whatever reason EI got Jumbos they were inefficiently run with the FORCED Shannon stopover. The runway in Dublin was arbitrarily short to prevent Jumbos from taking off on Trans Atlantic flights. Eventually the Irish Government saw the light and stopped the SNN stopover. DUB to SNN was the shortest scheduled flight by a 747.

User currently offlinetrex8 From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 4700 posts, RR: 14
Reply 24, posted (1 year 7 months 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 12924 times:
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Flew the one leased to Air Siam at least twice in the 70s.

25 Viscount724 : You could ask the same question about many other early 747 operators. They all thought they needed at least a couple of 747s for competitive reasons,
26 irishtexan : Can recall EI 747's going out on other relatively short leases not mentioned above - Air Jamaica (Kingston and Montego Bay from LHR), Qantas (LHR-SYD)
27 airbazar : I don't think the majority of the early 747 operators bought them for prestige. I think a far greater number bought it for the range. Back then the o
28 CF-CPI : Great vid. All that green in the cabin leaves us in no doubt as to this 747's origins. The load was not extremely high, based on the empty seats back
29 Viscount724 : That may be true for a few but by far the majority of early production 747-100s operated routes well within 707 and DC-8 range. That was certainly tr
30 musang : Runway expansion was specifically prevented at DUB to prevent long haul ops? Thanks - regards - musang
31 Viscount724 : For example, AA's 747-100s had 66 F class seats, 26 in the A zone in the nose and 40 in the B zone.
32 yyz717 : True, but prior to the first oil shock, the 747 was seen as the "natural" replacement for the 707 and DC-8 as traffic was growing strongly. Exactly.
33 kaitak : This was long suspected, but there isn't a lot of evidence to back it up. When the old (pre 1989) runways were in operation, they certainly couldn't
34 XXXX10 : The 747s wold often be used to LHR, normallly if there where Irish fans travelling over for a rugby match or at Christmas, IIRC this was the case unti
35 EIDL : There's an element of pride and image to the purchase - its quite likely that EI would have bought anything with Boeing's name on it at that time. The
36 scarebus03 : I remember the EI 747's being used for MGP on most Tuesdays. I vaguely remember that the EI B741s had some of the highest recorded cycles when they we
37 tonystan : Surprised no one has mentioned "Paddy Zulu" yet which was the B747 that went to BA (or was it BOAC) for a season!!!!!
38 scarebus03 : It was -ASJ and I believe it was BA and BCAL however in what order I'm not sure
39 jfk777 : EI leased its 747 many times because they had a huge summer season but low winter demand to JFK and BOS.
40 eta unknown : G-BDPZ was dedicated to the LHR-ORD route and operated out of LHR Terminal 1. Not sure if EI performed line maintenance on it at LHR. The SNN stopover
41 N1120A : Beyond prestige, the 747 offered significant range improvements over existing aircraft - and at a size that significantly reduced seat costs.
42 Post contains images airbazar : But with only 130 seats or so they were ridiculously expensive to fly when compared to the 747, and couldn't carry nearly the amount of cargo. Also,
43 shamrock604 : EI would have no problem filling a couple of 747's year round - JFK is double daily through the year now, with BOS double daily from DUB on many days
44 Viscount724 : You're overlooking the DC-8-61 and -63 which usually operated with around 200 seats in a 2-class configuration, and up to 250 in a high-density all-Y
45 yyz717 : The 742 was on offer before the 741 entered service. Indeed, the initial 742's entered service in late 1970, months after the initial 741. All the af
46 Viscount724 : Not quite. The first 742s were delivered to KLM and Swissair in January 1971, a full year after the 741 went into service..
47 yyz717 : But still ordered before the 741 service entry, proving my point that many carriers ordered (token) 2 747's, not just EI.
48 Viscount724 : I don't understand what point you are trying to make re the 742 vs 741. Many carriers that bought small numbers of early 747s bought the 741 (includi
49 yyz717 : Someone early in the thread said that only EI would buy (just) 2 747's for prestige. I was pointing out that it was common. Don't forget AC's initial
50 Post contains images airbazar : No, that's not it I was suggesting that with the explosion of air travel in the 60's, airlines saw the need for a bigger more capable airplane and th
51 shamrock604 : Indeed. EI could have ditched the entire 747 fleet quite easily, and much sooner than it did. EI ordered 2 767-300ER's specifically to launch a DUB-L
52 SpaceshipDC10 : Those two 767 were owned by GPA, and since they couldn't fly them on the wished route, they spent a lot of time sub-leased to other carriers, like Ae
53 bx737 : When EI ordered the 747s the passenger numbers were rising. They needed a bigger aircraft than the 707 for the summer period. This was recognised at t
54 Post contains images warden145 : Thank you guys...it's amazing how things may appear with the benefit of hindsight; however, with all due respect, I get the impression that there are
55 Tango-Bravo : What were the routes on which EI wished to fly the 767s they leased from GPA? What were the routes on which they were actually flown? Seems like the
56 skipness1E : Except the 767s didn't offer enough capacity for the summer, it really was that simple.
57 Newark727 : If you were a 747-100 customer, and it was because you needed more space than a 707, it doesn't seem like you had that many more options when the 747
58 kaitak : Originally, they were ordered for the DUB-LAX route, but as mentioned above, the govt of the time rejected this. There was a huge debate about this a
59 Newark727 : Did the DC-8-61 and -63 have trans-Atlantic range? Seems they didn't do much of that sort of flying except on weird military charters because of airli
60 SpaceshipDC10 : You are right about that but, to connect Ireland with say BOS, JFK and ORD, even the DC-10-10, the original version made for US domestic services, co
61 WA707atMSP : Before EI's 747s entered service, they signed an agreement with Trans Caribbean for TCA to lease the aircraft during the winter season. This would hav
62 longhauler : I think what a lot of younger readers here don't understand is that between the B707/DC-8/VC-10 and the B747, there was a huge leap in comfort ... and
63 Tango-Bravo : Since we have discussed the related subject of EI's trans-Atantic routes here, when and why did they discontinue Montreal? Seems that Canada would be
64 Viscount724 : But EI's primary market was Ireland. Who was EI competing with that operated 747s to Ireland? Pan Am didn't serve Ireland and even in the late '70s T
65 shamrock604 : Pan Am did fly to Ireland - just not to Dublin. Services by PA remained at SNN instead.
66 Viscount724 : Yes I see Pan Am had SNN service in 1973, also using the 707 like TWA, but they must have dropped Ireland completely not long after (probably also ar
67 LO231 : We should also look at photo search at WAW and LY. Sometimes they need them a lot, especially during holidays,, World War, Holocaust periodes and such
68 LO231 : We should also look at photo search at WAW and LY. Sometimes they need them a lot, especially during holidays,, World War, Holocaust periodes and such
69 longhauler : Yes. But I almost wonder if it was the chicken or the egg. Had EI not started B747 service into Ireland, would PA and TW have? That edge in competiti
70 WA707atMSP : Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 64): Pan Am did fly to Ireland - just not to Dublin. Services by PA remained at SNN instead. Yes I see Pan Am had SNN servi
71 tonystan : I wonder how different EI operations on the Atlantic may have looked during the 70s and 80s if they had held off a few years and waited for the DC10 o
72 tonystan : I wonder how different EI operations on the Atlantic may have looked during the 70s and 80s if they had held off a few years and waited for the DC10 o
73 SpaceshipDC10 : I don't remember at what time Aer Lingus placed its order for the 747s, but talks about the new long range DC-10-30 happened during 1969 with KSSU gr
74 Viscount724 : Boeing shows the the date of the EI order for 2 741s as January 10, 1967. EI flights to YUL continued to ORD, That route (DUB-SNN-YUL-ORD) started in
75 SpaceshipDC10 : Right, so that was a good two years before the DC-10-30 order I was referring to. Back in July 1989, I saw one of their 747 overnight at ORD
76 rwy04lga : 'Octomom, the prequel'
77 soon7x7 : EI-BED retired w/ 101,000 hours on her. I cut up her cargo doors, rudders, flaps , landing gears 2 years ago. Still got the upper crew escape hatches,
78 Tango-Bravo : Looking at EI's Winter 1972-73 timetable, the only 747 flights shown in their entire network of the time are EI/IN 105/104 DUB-SNN-JFK/JFK-SNN-DUB (IN
79 luckyone : The -63 definitely had Transatlantic range from Ireland. Just a thought, but did VFR have a hand in this decision? When the 747's were ordered, there
80 JETSTREAM63 : I flew on all three of the EI 747s over the years including 6 flights on EI-BED. Interesting to hear that you were there at the very end of her caree
81 Viscount724 : Even the -61 could probably handle Ireland-East Coast U.S. routes without much problem. Remember EI also used the early JT3C-powered Boeing 720 on tr
82 Post contains links kaitak : Just came across this video from back in 1971 - nice! http://euscreen.eu/play.jsp?id=EUS_666F78AFD0A7494196545257027FACDA Sometimes we forget what a m
83 SpaceshipDC10 : Interesting archive. I guess that presence is of course due to the sheer size and shape of the beast, but also probably due to the huge leap forward i
84 ClassicLover : Beautiful link!!!! My favourite quite - "It's so damned big that walking down its corridors is almost like a stroll down Grafton street." Also, check
85 tonymctigue : Speaking of meala on EI 747s, does anyone remember the kiddies meal box they used to give out? If I recall, it used to always be a burger, a green ap
86 EagleBoy : I have one of those old Young Flyers goodie bags, and a kids wings too
87 shankly : ....with proper potatoes as rightly demanded by all good Irishmen and women! As a young spotter in the 70'sand 80's, the EI 747's would pop up in man
88 Post contains links tonymctigue : It was leasing out excess EI capacity during the slow winter seasons that gave birth to what was once the worlds largest aircraft sales and leasing f
89 Sligo : Excellent picture selection there. Thanks for digging those up in order....
90 soon7x7 : I found some photos the other day of the rudder with the shamrock laying on the ground before I chopped her up...still have the shamrock panels thoug
91 jfk777 : Evrey one eating Filet Migon in coach ? Remember its the inaugural 747 for Aer Lingus so they could have had a "special meal." Even in 1970 EI wasn't
92 DTWPurserBoy : EI has a long history of buying questionable airplanes (i.e. B720 and 747) but then making money by leasing them out. Kind of a risky financial strate
93 scarebus03 : I certainly wouldn't refer to the 747 or indeed 720 being questionable Aircraft! However suitability for EI certainly may have been questionable. In
94 tonymctigue : I think it is also easy to look at the likes of the B747 and B720 as "questionable" aircraft for EI looking at it from today's point of view. It is v
95 DTWPurserBoy : I have often wondered if EI made more money actually flying people to and from Ireland or from aircraft leasing to third parties. If I remember correc
96 EagleBoy : In the 60's 70's EI were seen as non-aligned so they were an acceptable company to deal with for many countries around the round. Especially in Africa
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