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Gizmodo: When Flying Was Still Civilized  
User currently offlineBigGSFO From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 2925 posts, RR: 6
Posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 7727 times:

Interesting article in Gizmodo today:

Scenes from when flying was still civilized
http://gizmodo.com/5987350/scenes-from-when-flying-was-still-civilized

Times are sure different these days. Granted more people can fly for less money to more places, but the experience is so different than it was back in the so-called "golden age."

Enjoy!

66 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8707 posts, RR: 42
Reply 1, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 7606 times:

Quote:
There once was a Golden Age Of Flying. You didn't have to queue up, strip down, and surrender your beverage to the Goon Squad. Meals were served on real plates instead of sad, soggy cardboard boxes. The act of traveling itself was a pleasant part of the journey—instead of a necessary act of mass-transit. These conveniences still exist for the very rich, but there was a time when all of us had access to a fantastic world in the sky.

Where on Earth did they get that idea?   I'd much rather be able to fly on a small budget, yet still in near perfect safety, than pay a fortune for a ride on a lavish airship that has a decent chance of ending up a contorted wreck somwhere in the countryside.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlineBirdwatching From Germany, joined Sep 2003, 3822 posts, RR: 51
Reply 2, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 7506 times:

Quoting BigGSFO (Thread starter):
when flying was still civilized

Are you kidding? Every single one of those photos reek of cigarette smoke. No thanks. You can talk about the "golden age" of airline travel all you want, I wouldn't want to go back to those times if I had the chance.

Flying in an aircraft full of stinking smokers and paying a fortune. No thanks. I've said it before, the golden age of airline travel is... TODAY.

Soren   



All the things you probably hate about travelling are warm reminders that I'm home
User currently offline707lvr From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 585 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 7484 times:

I guess it's heartening in a sense to realize that (many, most?) young people think this mess of a world today is better than when life was less safe and smelled bad sometimes.

User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8707 posts, RR: 42
Reply 4, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 7387 times:

Quoting 707lvr (Reply 3):
I guess it's heartening in a sense to realize that (many, most?) young people think this mess of a world today is better than when life was less safe and smelled bad sometimes.

Well... the world has always been a mess, hasn't it? Sometimes it's a huge one, sometimes a slightly smaller one. And I really wouldn't want to go back to the days when cigarettes and flammable interiors caused disastrous on-board fires (such as Varig 820), highjackers were a considerable threat and navigation errors got you shot down from time to time (KAL 902 and 007). I also like the fact that I don't have to save up for ages to afford a short hop to, say, London and back.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlinelightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13134 posts, RR: 100
Reply 5, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 7115 times:
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Quoting BigGSFO (Thread starter):
Times are sure different these days. Granted more people can fly for less money to more places, but the experience is so different than it was back in the so-called "golden age."

pay similar inflation adjusted fares and one will travel better today. Neat photos,

Quoting Birdwatching (Reply 2):
Are you kidding? Every single one of those photos reek of cigarette smoke.

I like the pilot playing with kids with a pipe (unlit). I would never go back to the era where tobacco smoke was a weak attempt to cover up body odor.

Quoting 707lvr (Reply 3):

I guess it's heartening in a sense to realize that (many, most?) young people think this mess of a world today is better than when life was less safe and smelled bad sometimes.

Bring back horses! Then we can really have a high transportation fatality rate... Those darn young people not appreciating inhaling particulate and expecting sound insulation. Ahh... We wouldn't have people complaining about certain body issues if we used the old aircraft lubricants and went through the old aircraft vibration...

Quoting Birdwatching (Reply 2):
I've said it before, the golden age of airline travel is... TODAY.

Concur. In particular for long haul (> 5000nm).

Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlinetharanga From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 1865 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 6916 times:

"These conveniences still exist for the very rich, but there was a time when all of us had access to a fantastic world in the sky. "

A ridiculous quote from the webpage. Who exactly does the author think are the passengers in those old pictures? Does he think those are working class people, paying the real equivalent of today's cheap economy fares?


User currently offlinelonghauler From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 4992 posts, RR: 42
Reply 7, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 6901 times:

The only thing I see civilized in those pictures is that the passengers (and crew) considered it a privilege to travel by air ... not a right.

I would consider today's First Class, (and Business Class) to be superior to anything offered in the 1950s or 1960s. Imagine sitting in a seat of an L1049 vibrating your way across the Atlantic staring straight ahead ... at nothing. Nothing to do but eat and read.



Never gonna grow up, never gonna slow down .... Barefoot Blue Jean Night
User currently offlineBoeingGuy From United States of America, joined Dec 2010, 3076 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 6902 times:

Quoting tharanga (Reply 6):
"These conveniences still exist for the very rich, but there was a time when all of us had access to a fantastic world in the sky. "

Put it in perspective. It's been 12 years since a mainline commercial jet crashed in the US. Back in the golden days when flying was still civilized, crashes were regular occurrences. LAX had two fatal crashes in a 3 day period in 1969 (SK DC-8 and UA 727). Sure wish we could go back to those days and not the uncivilized days when one has to stop and think for awhile when was the last time there was a commercial airplane crash in the Western world.


User currently onlineBMI727 From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 15745 posts, RR: 27
Reply 9, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 6850 times:

Quoting tharanga (Reply 6):
A ridiculous quote from the webpage.

   Gizmodo is part of Gawker Media, which is an unabashedly left wing outlet. A lot of what they write is very entertaining, and I read Deadspin and Jalopnik pretty much everyday, but you have to understand that there's sometimes a lens applied to the content. Some things on Gawker are pretty much yellow journalism.



Why do Aerospace Engineering students have to turn things in on time?
User currently offlinefrmrCapCadet From United States of America, joined May 2008, 1718 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 6808 times:

It is true that in the 60s and 70s the flying was a high point of the journey and/or vacation. And it is true that the safety of current flights is an improvement. Why would anyone deny either statement?


Buffet: the airline business...has eaten up capital...like..no other (business)
User currently offlineSenchingo From Germany, joined Oct 2010, 111 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 6786 times:

(Ladies (if there are any) and) Gentlemen,

you are comparing apples to oranges here.

I don't compare smartphones to 1940's method of calling someone. Or a hybrid-intelligent-accident-avoiding-driver-supporting-tire-pressure-measuring car to a 1910 built Ford Model T. Or 3D-internet-wifi-hand-move-capture TV's to something that simply didn't exist those days.

For me, the "golden age" of air travelling were the 60-70's. I'm not going to talk about things like "the rich could afford it and it was supposed to be so" or "smoking was allowed" or "you got real service" (that would cause too much discussions for sure). It was simply the kind of glamour and feeling that came along with air travel. It was so much more than today's cheap cheap mass mass kind of travelling. It was a real experience, something that you could talk about with friends and relatives and it caused an impressed "wow" in the round. Today, everyone is travelling now and then and ultra long haul trips for vacation are kind of a normal thing to do for everyone.

Talking like that, one might imagine grandpa sitting in his chair with the pipe in his mouth, which made me think: Is there any average about the age of a.net users? Would be of my interest.


User currently offlineseabosdca From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 5467 posts, RR: 6
Reply 12, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 6736 times:

Completely ridiculous. The 1980s, the last part of this supposed "golden age," were the time when I flew the most frequently. And today's experience is vastly superior, for (adjusted for inflation) much less money.

Quoting Birdwatching (Reply 2):
Are you kidding? Every single one of those photos reek of cigarette smoke. No thanks.

     

Quoting tharanga (Reply 6):
A ridiculous quote from the webpage. Who exactly does the author think are the passengers in those old pictures? Does he think those are working class people, paying the real equivalent of today's cheap economy fares?

   There's a reason it used to be called the "jet set."


User currently offlinemacsog6 From Singapore, joined Jan 2010, 533 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 6734 times:
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Quoting Birdwatching (Reply 2):
the golden age of airline travel is... TODAY.

I am old enough to have flown in most of these pictures. I took my first flight in 1948, although I don't recall it as I was a mere eight weeks old, but do recall other flights during the "golden age". Yes, there were somethings that were better, I suppose, but air travel was reserved for the few, not for the population in general. It was so rare that I was quite envied by my schoolmates as I flew five or six times a year thanks to my father's job.

Flights were viewed as being quite risky (look at the safety numbers), expensive, and - while fast compared to boats and trains - not as comfortable as boats and trains were. Before the jet age when the propliners flew at lower altitiudes, air sickness was quite common. My sister almost always was sick from the chop you usually encountered.

And by today's standards, the flights were quite long in duration. Going from Frankfurt, to London, then to Shannon, then across to Gander and finally down to New York took about 24 hours. I never crossed the Pacific during this time, but I imagine things were not much different.

Now I fly to LAX, hop on the direct SQ flight to SIN, and make it half way around the world in about 18 hours and safety of the flight is only something I consider when making my personal evacuation plan. And I will tell you this, SQ's inflight service is ever bit as good was Pan Am's was in 1953 from what I and my sister recall.

The Golden Age of Flight is right now. Go buy a ticket, put up with the hassle - if you think today is bad, try going through immigration in 1953 when visas were required for almost everywhere and every border required a baggage inspection - of TSA, and enjoy the flight. You'll be doing it better than anyone ever has before.

Happy Flying!



Sixty Plus Years of Flying! "I fly because it releases my mind from the tyranny of petty things." - Saint Ex
User currently offlineQuokkas From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 6601 times:

The problem with sites that basically republish ads from the airlines is that it helps to perpetuate a myth. While in its infancy and early years flying may have been a novel thrill, the idea that it was all luxury is mistaken. Then, just like now, if you wanted luxury you paid for it. By concentrating on photos published by the airlines, all we get to see is how passengers in First were treated. It's the same when people wax lyrical about the glamour of ocean liners. How come there are no photos of what things were like in third/ steerage/ economy? Then, as now, the Golden Age was restricted to a few.

For those who want a bit of "glamour" or luxury, the airlines still offer extras that in many ways are superior to past offerings. Travel in First on leading airlines and you will have: a private reception for check-in; first class lounges featuring fine dining, spas and masseuse; separate jet bridge so that you don't mingle with those who can't afford it; a private suite on board; à la carte on-demand dining or "book ther chef" and order before you fly; complimentary pyjamas and amenity kits; complimentary chauffeur-driven limousines to transfer you from home to the airport and to your hotel; a very generous baggage allowance, and more. You just have to pay the necessary fare.

The exclusivity of any "Golden Age" has a price. Perhaps in twenty years time we will see pictures of Emirate's on board shower-spa and say this was the Golden Age, conveniently forgetting how most passengers sat ten-abreast in Economy.

In the meantime, due to greater efficiencies in aviation, more people than ever before can afford to travel with greater options, from deciding on a basic fare with add-ons like BOB and baggage fees to wi-fi Internet and IFE and included meals.


User currently onlineByrdluvs747 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 2361 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 6587 times:

Well the title says "When flying was still civilized", and for me that means properly dressed people with manners. You wouldn't see people putting their bare stinking feet on the bulkheads, or coming onboard wearing torn jeans, flipflops, and smelling like last week.

What we have today makes me long for the days of DC8s and dinner jackets (even though I wasn't born then).



The 747: The hands who designed it were guided by god.
User currently offlinebobloblaw From United States of America, joined Jan 2012, 1725 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 6560 times:

The best time to be an airline employee was the mid 1980s thru the 1990s. Pay was still good and airlines began allowing employees unlimited free or close to free travel. Before the mid 1980s many airlines required nonrevs wear a suit, not get benefits for years or limited number of flights per year. Loads were around 70% so travel was easy. Meals still in Y and F class was accessible.

User currently offlinealoges From Germany, joined Jan 2006, 8707 posts, RR: 42
Reply 17, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 6462 times:

Quoting Byrdluvs747 (Reply 15):
Well the title says "When flying was still civilized", and for me that means properly dressed people with manners.

There have always been jerks and well-mannered people. The rarity of flying may have made people dress up for the occasion, but it won't have turned them all into angels.

Quoting Byrdluvs747 (Reply 15):
You wouldn't see people putting their bare stinking feet on the bulkheads, or coming onboard wearing torn jeans, flipflops, and smelling like last week.

Well, the oil fumes and cigarette smoke in the cabin probably covered up those smells - but I don't think that just about everyone showered daily in 1962... or changed underwear every day.



Walk together, talk together all ye peoples of the earth. Then, and only then, shall ye have peace.
User currently offlinespacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3629 posts, RR: 12
Reply 18, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 6290 times:

Quoting Quokkas (Reply 14):
While in its infancy and early years flying may have been a novel thrill, the idea that it was all luxury is mistaken. Then, just like now, if you wanted luxury you paid for it.

Not entirely true, or at least not entirely true a bit later in this "golden age". While fares were generally higher when adjusted for inflation, the difference between a first class ticket and a coach ticket was not the massive gulf that often exists now. Flying first class was not out of bounds for average people. My family was certainly not rich and yet throughout the 1970's, we flew first class about every other flight (for a family of four). I recall fares something like $700 per person for coach for a transcon flight, or around $1,000 for first class.

At the same time, coach was not the 31" seat pitch, fee-laden, food-less nightmare it is now. On flights longer than about 2 hours, you got a hot meal, as many drinks and snacks as you wanted, and seat pitch was more like 35" (I still remember United's DC-8's at that time with 38" - whenever we flew coach, we always tried to book United and hoped we'd get a DC-8). And back then, you'd actually be considered unlucky if you ended up seated next to someone you hadn't booked your trip with - middle seats were almost always empty. So to answer another argument in this thread, you can say that even flying coach was more expensive then, but you also got more for your money.

Don't forget that there also weren't extra charges like bag fees, booking fees, telephone service fees or even fuel surcharges. The price of the ticket was how much your trip cost, period. If you were to try to book a trip today exactly equivalent in terms of services and comfort as you would have had in the 1970's or before, I'm not convinced it wouldn't cost you pretty much the same amount in the end. (I'm also not convinced you could actually even do it on a domestic flight, because of so many services that have been cut. No way to get a hot meal on board most domestic flights now, for example.) You'd probably actually have to book business class.

I think that certainly on international routes, especially for foreign airlines, it's not impossible to have an experience as good or better than what you'd have gotten up to the 1970's... if you pay for it. And you'll probably pay *more* now than you would have then, because first and even business class have gotten so ridiculous on some airlines. But there's not much that's comparable to the service level of international coach in those days anymore, even if you wanted to pay for it. Maybe something like JAL's Premium Economy, but that kind of thing isn't very common among modern airlines and it's also quite expensive (it's a true fourth class between economy and business, not just a few extra inches of legroom like Delta's Economy Comfort or other E+ offerings). The modern international economy level of service didn't really exist in the old days. If prices are lower now, it's because the airlines have essentially invented a new, lower class of service than what used to be officially called coach.



I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
User currently offlinemayor From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 10432 posts, RR: 14
Reply 19, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 6269 times:

Quoting bobloblaw (Reply 16):
The best time to be an airline employee was the mid 1980s thru the 1990s. Pay was still good and airlines began allowing employees unlimited free or close to free travel. Before the mid 1980s many airlines required nonrevs wear a suit, not get benefits for years or limited number of flights per year. Loads were around 70% so travel was easy. Meals still in Y and F class was accessible.

For me it was about 10 years earlier and I don't believe DL changed the dress code to a more casual one until the mid 90s or even later. I can remember standing in baggage claim in MCO in a suit and probably being the only person within a hundred mile radius to be dressed that way. And yet, they didn't want us to "advertise" that we were non-revs, although everyone knew what we were.



"A committee is a group of the unprepared, appointed by the unwilling, to do the unnecessary"----Fred Allen
User currently offline707lvr From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 585 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 6227 times:

Talk about apples and oranges. When you all compare the current comfort , convenience, cost and safety (boooooring) with our travel experience in the 40-60's, I'm comparing my travel to the 1912's, e.g., "coach" on the Titanic. I never once thought about the safety record of DC-4's or 727's while flying on one, and believe it or not, people were not as pathological about cigarettes in those days. Gentleman stood when a lady entered the room, and in generally life was massively less crude fifty years ago, especially taking a flight on an airplane.

User currently offlinebobloblaw From United States of America, joined Jan 2012, 1725 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6150 times:

Those of you complaining about how much smoking there was on planes at that time, there was smoking in all public accommodations. You wouldn't have cared. What you're doing us imposing at 21st century value onto the mid 20th century society. That was part of life. The nonsmoking section was slightly better than smoking as the fumes did tend to the rear of the plane. It would be interesting to know if "Stews" had a higher rate of lung cancer than the general public.

Quoting aloges (Reply 17):


User currently offlinespeedygonzales From Norway, joined Sep 2007, 732 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 6011 times:

Quoting Byrdluvs747 (Reply 15):
Well the title says "When flying was still civilized", and for me that means properly dressed people with manners. You wouldn't see people putting their bare stinking feet on the bulkheads, or coming onboard wearing torn jeans, flipflops, and smelling like last week.

Flying is a form of public transport. Buy or charter a private plane if you can't stand the public.



Las Malvinas son Argentinas
User currently offlinenicoeddf From Germany, joined Jan 2008, 1099 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 5880 times:

Quoting Byrdluvs747 (Reply 15):
Well the title says "When flying was still civilized", and for me that means properly dressed people with manners. You wouldn't see people putting their bare stinking feet on the bulkheads, or coming onboard wearing torn jeans, flipflops, and smelling like last week.

Interesting - I estimate my flights as about 50-100 per year. Never have I encountered a higher rate of smelly persons in either Y or C than in any other form of public life - which included business, your bus trip to next town or one of your friends after some serious drinking at a music festival.

Further - I certainly hope the time and age where the fashion taste re torn jeans was a sign of the value of a person has long gone.

Quoting bobloblaw (Reply 16):
Pay was still good and airlines began allowing employees unlimited free or close to free travel. Before the mid 1980s many airlines required nonrevs wear a suit, not get benefits for years or limited number of flights per year

Pay IS still good in the airline industry. Nothing tells us there is a significant difference in pay compared to other industries for comparable education level.

And regarding suits - pls check the rules about standby flying for the various airlines. Its still mostly asked for (minus the tie...) and why shouldn't it be? It is asking for the manners you all long for...
Even if I go for a business trip for (and by coincidence also on the equipment of) my employer, I am required to dress appropriately which means basically a suit.


User currently offlinelightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13134 posts, RR: 100
Reply 24, posted (1 year 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 5733 times:
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Quoting longhauler (Reply 7):
Nothing to do but eat and read.

And discuss. Conversation used to be an art instead of soundbites. And reading... not something to be just interupted.

Quoting Senchingo (Reply 11):
I'm not going to talk about things like "the rich could afford it and it was supposed to be so" or "smoking was allowed" or "you got real service" (that would cause too much discussions for sure). It was simply the kind of glamour and feeling that came along with air travel.

It wasn't that glamorous. The smells... I have a good sense of smell (unlike most smokers) and I recall how bad the old aircraft cabins smelled after a few years. For many the stale cigarette smoke masked the other odors. But for myself, I still recall the smells. I'm much happier on today's cleaner aircraft.

About the only plus was dressing up. But I still throw on a sports coat (no tie) as the service improves dramatically versus the same attire in a casual jacket!

Quoting 707lvr (Reply 20):
people were not as pathological about cigarettes in those days.

Not true. I remember gentlemen blowing smoke in my face when I was a child. People were incredibly selfish with cigarettes back then.

Quoting nicoeddf (Reply 23):
Never have I encountered a higher rate of smelly persons in either Y or C than in any other form of public life

It was worse back then for people thought they were masking their odor, in particular with perfumes or cigarette smoke (it didn't it just stacked bad odor on bad odor). I prefer flying today.

Quoting nicoeddf (Reply 23):
Further - I certainly hope the time and age where the fashion taste re torn jeans was a sign of the value of a person has long gone.

Somewhat. If you dress like a 'nice person' one is far more likely to be treated as a 'nice person.' Throw a sports coat over those ripped jeans and you would be amazed how much better one is treated.


Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
25 mayor : Not at DL. The dress code has gone from coat, dress pants & tie (when I started) to "business casual" to virtually no dress code at all (with a f
26 Quokkas : This is true but even my local bus company imposes standards of behaviour. They have posted behind the driver a sign that list the Rules for a Pleasa
27 AeroWesty : Granted I didn't begin flying internationally until the early 1980s, but I don't recall any great preponderance of stinky, smelly people either on pl
28 Quokkas : That is an interesting point. In earlier days people had fewer claims on their attention. We didn't have 24/7 internet/smartphone/always on line conn
29 ItalianFlyer : I love these 'golden age threads'!! Big points made above (I'm not going to beat to death) about price and overall safety. Remember these are all mark
30 spacecadet : The flipside to that is that if you choose *not* behave like a boor, you *do* have a right to complain about being treated like one by others. I'm no
31 mayor : Lets not forget that ever since the advent of lower fares (comparatively) there have been more of the "Greyhound" crowd on board the flights than ever
32 AVIATEUR : As I talk about in one of my recent blog posts, there's a certain mythology to the "good old days" of flying. It depends, I suppose, on which decades
33 EASTERN747 : I began really flying in 1968. I had been on earlier flights, but they don't count, really.The Golden Age of flying was coming to it's Fall. Jets of c
34 jporterfi : As one of those "young people" you are referring to, I agree with your assertion. There's no denying that the world (particularly the U.S.) is in a b
35 Viscount724 : That may be true in Germany but I continually read about regional carrier pilots in the U.S. with starting salaries around $20,000 a year. How many o
36 BAeRJ100 : I have to say I'm not a fan of Gizmodo, I find their articles are written in such an insulting and negative tone. The journalist seems to think they c
37 spacecadet : This is a nice perk and now that we have it, it's not something I'd want to go without (though mostly because any further downgrades these days just
38 flyingturtle : Golden Age of flying? That was when you dressed appropriately for the act of flying or traveling in general, that's when you actually talked to a trav
39 AVIATEUR : You make some interesting points. I stand by what I wrote, but I don't totally disagree with you. The passenger's entire mindset, and set of expectat
40 Quokkas : You mean today? Check out some of the conditions of carriage at various airlines. At UA, for example, they can refuse to carry you if you are bare-fo
41 JAAlbert : I agree. Although, I must admit my parents flew our entire family - then five children (kids 1 baby, the rest 3yrs - 9yrs) from TUS to JFK in 1964 to
42 mplsjefe : They can refuse to carry you if you are wearing flip-flops? Really?
43 Aither : What is the most important thing when flying ? that's safety. Calling "golden age" a period when safety was much less than today always surprises me.
44 nwcoflyer : Interesting... bare feet I can understand. Flip flops seems crazy. I cant imagine telling someone in HNL or SAN they cant fly because they are wearin
45 skipness1E : I am old enough to remember tobacco addicts being surprised that I didn't think stale smoke was a good thing to have in an enclosed space. Most non sm
46 mayor : You'd probably have to get confirmation from a F/A, to be sure, but I think it's a safety issue.
47 mplsjefe : Agreed.
48 Post contains images PC12Fan : Yea, God forbid someone having to read a good book.
49 timpdx : just out of curiosity, since I, too, dont remember smoking flights being not THAT bad, did aircraft circulate more air in the cabin back then certain
50 Viscount724 : Pan Am had 5 fatal 707 crashes in less than 9 months in 1972/73. If that happened today the airline probably wouln't be around much longer. In those
51 AirCalSNA : Flying is safer and cheaper now, but being a planespotter in the 1970's and 1980"s was way more fun than it is today.
52 JAAlbert : Um, I'm not sure if you're remembering the smoking flights as being old or not from your syntax! I remember fly from TUS-LGA on AA in 1979 - I was se
53 neutrino : Did Zola Budd travel the same as she race? Would be interesting if she did.
54 ABQopsHP : Yes sir! I did most of my non-reving back then. Flew all over the place, and most of the time for free. And when lucky enough to get F-class? That co
55 Post contains links factsonly : QUESTION.......A.Netters... http://img.gawkerassets.com/img/18fycnzu1q18kjpg/xlarge.jpg Looking at the 1960's Concorde picture in the GIZMODO article,
56 mplsjefe : So, instead of planning for a comfortable flight we should all plan for disaster? I wholeheartedly agree that if I am wearing flip-flops and burn my
57 lychemsa : I started flying in the 1950s and it was more fun and more relaxed. Airports were not as crowded; no need for security checks; seats were comfortable
58 PanAmPaul : The Comet 4 interior photo in the article shows what looks like almost lie-flat seating. Does anyone here know about these kinds of seats and other ea
59 mayor : DIdn't the PanAm Clippers of the late 30s have berths (lie flats)?
60 seabosdca : I was around then, and I found smoke just as disgusting as I do today, so I did very much care. I dreaded my long flights solely because I knew I cou
61 neutrino : Glad that smoking is now prohibited on (all?) flights. When did the ban start and gather steam? I started flying in the smoky mid-seventies and often
62 seabosdca : In the U.S.: Short-haul flights: 1988 Flights up to six hours: 1990 All flights: 1998
63 Post contains images lightsaber : It is often mocked today... I wonder if those mocking know the impression they set? People very much cared. One reason Starbucks took off early as a
64 Post contains links AeroWesty : California's law went into effect first: 2 Airlines Reject Smoking Ban On California Law's First Day The U.S. law went into effect in April 1988 for
65 mayor : DL banned smoking on ALL flights in '95.
66 quiet1 : As far as non=smokers being right ahead of smokers, that wasn't as bad as my first time on NW: Non-smokers on the left and smokers on the right! Later
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