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TSA To Start Allowing Small Pocket Knives Onboard  
User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5485 posts, RR: 8
Posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11105 times:

The TSA has made changes that now will allow small pocket knives on board passengers aircraft. The FA Unions have protested that it increases danger to those on board the aircraft and want the change rescinded.

I for one think it a sound decision and one that will not truly increase the danger on board (even the unions admit that tsuch knives pose little or no danger to pilots while flying).

Quote:
The Transportation Security Administration announced Tuesday that U.S. airline passengers will soon be allowed to carry small knives in their carry-on bags, a move that prompted swift condemnation from a flight attendants union.

The union for Southwest Airlines flight attendants called the decision "dangerous" and "designed to make the lives of TSA staff easier, but not make flights safer."

The changes were made public by TSA Administrator John Pistole during an aviation conference in New York.

Starting April 25, passengers going through U.S. airports can bring on board Swiss Army-type knives -- specifically, ones with blades no longer than 2.36 inches.

This marks the first time such knives have been allowed on board since security was heavily increased in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.

Pistole told the audience that TSA screeners at the Los Angeles International Airport alone seized roughly 47 such knives a day over the last three months of 2012, according to Air Transportation World.

"Frankly, I don't want TSA agents to be delayed by these," he said.

The agency said the changes were made as part of its "overall risk-based security approach" and to align with the international standards and those of European countries.
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/03/05/tsa-allows-knives-on-board/

Also now allowed will be lacrosse sticks, ski poles and small, souvenir baseball bats.

Tugg


I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
139 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25041 posts, RR: 46
Reply 1, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11066 times:

The change is simply to better align US screening policy with those of our partner nations which do allow things like smaller Swiss army knives.

More interesting will be come January 1st, 2014 when the EU and most Asian nations remove the liquid restrictions.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlinejfklganyc From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 3430 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11054 times:

Why?

Why allow a knife on board? Just for the heck of it?


User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7862 posts, RR: 52
Reply 3, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11054 times:

Wow a step in the right direction, I wonder if this is the start of some more common sense things to come...


Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlineytz From Canada, joined Jun 2009, 1986 posts, RR: 24
Reply 4, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11038 times:

The 9/11 hijackers had box cutters.

A 2.36" blade is still substantial enough to cause serious injury. Forget terrorism. There will be people getting stabbed during simple fisticuffs. And there is zero reason, anyone will need one in flight.

I'd rather they ease up on all that food and liquid rules over this.


User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5485 posts, RR: 8
Reply 5, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 11030 times:

Quoting jfklganyc (Reply 2):
Why allow a knife on board? Just for the heck of it?

Because many, many people carry one with them all the time. I always used to and often still do "in public" because they are very useful and cars key just don't always work.

Quoting ytz (Reply 4):
There will be people getting stabbed during simple fisticuffs.

That's not going to happen. Why would it suddenly begin to happen now when it didn't happen before? Why not wait to see if it is an actual problem rather than just ban them? Otherwise we should ban everything that might possibly be harmful to others.

Tugg

[Edited 2013-03-05 13:29:15]


I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7862 posts, RR: 52
Reply 6, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 10993 times:

Quoting ytz (Reply 4):
A 2.36" blade is still substantial enough to cause serious injury. Forget terrorism. There will be people getting stabbed during simple fisticuffs. And there is zero reason, anyone will need one in flight.

They are very convenient... I always carry one around. I probably won't need it in flight but I won't have to throw mine away in the trash can because I forgot to leave it home. Minus 9/11 (which passengers and pilots have shown won't be allowed to happen the same way again,) was there a knife problem before the pocket knife ban?



Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlineskipness1E From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2007, 3223 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 10978 times:

The FAs were badly cut on 9/11, you can do serious damage with a box cutter if you're a nutter.

User currently offlineTK787 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 4420 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10899 times:

Is it still OK to carry matches or a lighter on board?
Thanks.


User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2355 posts, RR: 13
Reply 9, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10829 times:

Quoting ytz (Reply 4):
A 2.36" blade

Exactly the length of a Swiss Army knife's blade. Coincidence?


David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5592 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10814 times:

Quoting jfklganyc (Reply 2):
Why?

Why allow a knife on board? Just for the heck of it?
Quoting ytz (Reply 4):
And there is zero reason, anyone will need one in flight.

Why is it that we all of a sudden need "reasons" for going about our daily business? Last I checked, one of the founding principles of the US was freedom, the freedom to do as one pleases, so long as it doesn't violate anyone's basic rights. And the burden of proof for that lies with the state, not the individual.

Quoting ytz (Reply 4):
There will be people getting stabbed during simple fisticuffs.

No, there won't be.

Quoting skipness1E (Reply 7):
you can do serious damage with a box cutter if you're a nutter.

You can do serious damage with your fists if you're a nutter. I've seen it. Should we require all passengers be bound and gagged too?



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently offlineMIflyer12 From United States of America, joined Feb 2013, 994 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10773 times:

Quoting flyingturtle (Reply 9):
Quoting ytz (Reply 4):
A 2.36" blade

Exactly the length of a Swiss Army knife's blade. Coincidence?

Ever visit a Victorinox store in Switzerland? There must be a hundred models of knives.


User currently offlinemax550 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 1148 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10762 times:

It's about time. The reinforced and secured cockpit doors alone prevent small knives from being dangerous to the flight, even before you consider all the other changes that have happened since 9/11.
I'm glad there's one less thing to have to remember to not bring to the airport with you. Those small pocket tools can be very expensive.

Quoting ytz (Reply 4):
A 2.36" blade is still substantial enough to cause serious injury. Forget terrorism. There will be people getting stabbed during simple fisticuffs. And there is zero reason, anyone will need one in flight.

People carry knives like that everywhere else and it's very rare that someone gets stabbed randomly with one. How often have you seen simple fisticuffs on aircraft anyway? I believe that's very rare as well (since it's national news every time it happens).

Quoting TK787 (Reply 8):

Is it still OK to carry matches or a lighter on board?
Thanks.

I think they were banned for a little while after the shoe bomber incident but were quickly allowed again. The torch type lighters are still banned though.


User currently offlineNWAROOSTER From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1081 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10703 times:
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A Swiss Army knife is still a weapon in the hands of the wrong person.
They should still be confined to checked luggage.
If someone is dumb enough to bring one through security, they are dumb enough to loose it.   


User currently offlineantoniemey From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 1555 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10701 times:

Quoting skipness1E (Reply 7):
you can do serious damage with a box cutter if you're a nutter.

or a fork, or a spoon, or a roll of duct tape, or...

really? The list of things you COULDN'T use as a weapon would be easier to list, yet we haven't banned everything imaginable from aircraft cabins...



Make something Idiot-proof, and the Universe will make a more inept idiot.
User currently offlinePITingres From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 1131 posts, RR: 13
Reply 15, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10701 times:

Quoting skipness1E (Reply 7):
you can do serious damage with a box cutter if you're a nutter.

Or an Ethernet cable. Or a sharp pencil. Or a necktie. Or fists. Or shoes. Or ....

The TSA rules are, or at least ought to be, about flight safety, not preventing some wacko from hurting someone else. The small knife restriction, like the liquids restriction, has no meaning for flight safety.

Box cutters ONLY worked on 9/11 because it was the first time. On the first couple flights everyone thought that they were just going to Havana, or Tripoli, or whatever. That notion was dispelled within the first couple hours and I'd be surprised to see a successful hijack with close-in arms, ever again. In numerous ways, 9/11 was a one-trick pony and I'm glad to see some of the more useless restrictions start to fall.



Fly, you fools! Fly!
User currently offlineMaverick623 From United States of America, joined Nov 2006, 5592 posts, RR: 6
Reply 16, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10642 times:

Quoting NWAROOSTER (Reply 13):
A Swiss Army knife is still a weapon in the hands of the wrong person.
They should still be confined to checked luggage.

Hot coffee is a weapon in the hands of the wrong person. Should we be banning Starbucks from airplanes, too?



"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
User currently offlinePROSA From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5641 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10610 times:

Lacrosse sticks, really? As far as I know they're too long to fit in the overhead compartments, at least not easily, and obviously no one is going to have a lacrosse match aboard an airliner. Requiring them to be checked makes more sense.


"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
User currently offlineDeltaMD90 From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 7862 posts, RR: 52
Reply 18, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 10600 times:

Quoting NWAROOSTER (Reply 13):
A Swiss Army knife is still a weapon in the hands of the wrong person.

Again, where are all the cases of people using 2.36" blades against others in an airplane? I think it's safe to say that 9/11 in the way it was executed is impossible this day and age

Should we ban everything that a "wrong person" can use to harm others?



Ironically I have never flown a Delta MD-90 :)
User currently offlinetugger From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 5485 posts, RR: 8
Reply 19, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 10543 times:

Quoting PROSA (Reply 17):
Lacrosse sticks, really? As far as I know they're too long to fit in the overhead compartments, at least not easily, and obviously no one is going to have a lacrosse match aboard an airliner. Requiring them to be checked makes more sense.

Yes but that is an airline decision and not TSA. They just won't stop them from going through anymore.

Tugg



I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. -W. Shatner
User currently offlinejayunited From United States of America, joined Jan 2013, 916 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 10543 times:

Majority of the flying public are law abiding citizens who are just looking to get from point "A" to point "B". I think the FA unions are concerned about the one lone person who just might be crazy enough to try something while in flight. And while the pilots are now safe behind reinforced flight deck doors most FA unions still see their people as being vulnerable even though the chances of some one using a knife on the aircraft is slim to none. So don't dismiss the FA's or their unions position just because you disagree with them they are just trying to make sure that the government does everything it can to keep their work environment as safe as possible.

Remember the ruckus s-UA pilots made when UA decided to remove the security gates off the B757 fleet? Sometimes pilots and FA just get use to certain security procedures and they don't want to see those security procedures changed or relaxed.


User currently offlinelewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3623 posts, RR: 5
Reply 21, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 10504 times:

If they should start allowing more things in the cabin, why not start with the more stupid bans, like toiletries. Why start from something that can actually be used as a weapon?

User currently offlineawacsooner From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 1893 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 10481 times:

Yah...this won't end well. The first time some drunk pulls a knife on someone, we're back to square one...or worse.

User currently offlineflyingturtle From Switzerland, joined Oct 2011, 2355 posts, RR: 13
Reply 23, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 10475 times:

Quoting MIflyer12 (Reply 11):
Ever visit a Victorinox store in Switzerland? There must be a hundred models of knives.

There are hundreds of models, yes. The typical red ones - the ones you buy in tourist shops - share some of the tools, among others the large blade. The sharpened, cutting part of the blade is 2.36 in as I've measured.



There are other models, some that look like the Leatherman tools - they have longer blades. The actual current military-issue knife is this one, and should also have a longer blade than the typical red "tourist" issue:



Blade lengths (overall blade length, cutting + non-cutting part):
- Victorinox: http://www.smartknives.com/Swiss-Arm...e-Tools/Victorinox-Large-Blade.htm
- Wenger: http://www.smartknives.com/Swiss-Arm...Knife-Tools/Wenger-Large-Blade.htm

David



Keeping calm is terrorism against those who want to live in fear.
User currently offlineskipness1E From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2007, 3223 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 10475 times:

Quoting max550 (Reply 12):
The reinforced and secured cockpit doors alone prevent small knives from being dangerous to the flight, even before you consider all the other changes that have happened since 9/11.

Are you sure they couldn't cut your throat and force entry by picking on the smallest female? How confident are you?


25 ytz : Except that they are still holding on to the liquids ban. And that's been broadly interpreted to ban pies on airplanes. So they'll ease up on pocket
26 SPREE34 : You can kiil a person with a #2 pecil, or Bic pen, in 3 seconds. We have to quit looking at things, and start looking at people. P R O F I L E ! It wo
27 Aesma : I didn't know you could bring those aboard planes in Europe. Last time I flew my bottle of San Pellegrino was taken by security... And I lost a pocket
28 Post contains images OB1504 : With the bulletproof doors now present on most airliners, it won't even affect the pilots directly if the TSA starts letting guns on board, but the F
29 DariusBieber : TSA is a failing government organization. A knife is now okay, but I cannot bring on a bottle of water or shampoo over a couple ounces. Nice.
30 SPREE34 : You didn't read the article. The fluid restrictions will go as well.
31 DariusBieber : Hmm, I don't see it in the article...
32 Stabilator : I read the article and saw no mention of lifting the fluids ban. What paragraph, please?
33 DeltaMD90 : Idk I already said I think it's stupid, guess I wasn't clear. I'm glad and surprised they became more relaxed on small pocket knives yet keep some ot
34 kalvado : probably confusion with first comment:
35 Braniff747SP : About time; frankly, considering the post-9/11 mentality, someone with a 2.36 in blade won't get far before he is toppled by everyone. Hopefully, this
36 DariusBieber : Ah so how would Asia-US or EU-US flight work with liquids? I'm sure many passengers will take expensive colognes with them from the EU and be able to
37 SPREE34 : No, my confusion with a different source. The end objective seems coming inline with the rest of the world. So the fluid restrictions will change as
38 globetrotter29 : I fail to understand why a person would need to bring a readily accessible blade of any length onto an aircraft.
39 airtechy : Sorry. I typically have no use for the knife. It's all the other tools in the kit...such as the screwdriver which I seem to need. Keep in mind not eve
40 Post contains images soon7x7 : A step in the right direction would be to disband the TSA for good. Since box cutters were smaller than swiss army knives, I don't see the logic, but
41 flyingturtle : I found the army knife perfect for cutting apples and cheese. Very rarely I think of cutting apples, cheese and bread before I go on a longer railway
42 max550 : Sure, they could cut my throat. So could anyone whenever they want. I don't see why that would make the pilots more likely to open the cockpit door.
43 JBAirwaysFan : Maybe this is the plane crash survivor in me talking, but I'm really not thrilled with this.
44 Speedbird128 : I can do with my hands. Should they be in checked luggage too?
45 boeing773ER : I don't understand the point of this. Why does a pocket knife need to be on board with you in your pocket? I don't believe there is anything you are g
46 Mcoov : Most people carry multitool knives, such as the Swiss Army Knife, or a leatherman, which have scissor tools, NOT JUST a knife like a box cutter or a
47 vegas005 : Trained people can kill with any object or no object...even a pair of shoe laces can be lethal if used correctly. Banning small knives does not solve
48 flyingturtle : Well, I get astonished looks when my "Army" knife lies on the table, with the blade folded out, in a railway coach full of travelers... The normal red
49 XT6Wagon : I hate to say it... but somehow back before 9/11 I carried on a swiss army knife with a quite large blade and managed not only be let through security
50 Skydrol : Don't see a problem with small knives either. And the sooner they abolish the liquids ban, the sooner the line ups at security checkpoints will reduce
51 Braybuddy : Why on earth would anyone need to carry a knife on board an aircraft? Funny that I've managed to survive and travel around the world over all these ye
52 Post contains images Unflug : ... because it is not dangerous as long as the words "Terrorist" or "Bomb" are not mentioned On the serious side, I think this is the simple answer:
53 B727FA : >>You can do serious damage with your fists if you're a nutter. I've seen it. Should we require all passengers be bound and gagged too? (wink wi
54 mtnwest1979 : Heck, if anyone wanted to cause harm, wouldn't it be easier to strangle someone with a shoelace??
55 unityofsaints : I like the change but liquids should have been allowed back in first. Obviously drinks are more of a cash cow at airports than knives...
56 antoniemey : How many times, in the history of commercial aviation, has a drunk passenger pulled a knife aboard an aircraft? I'll wait while you go find some exam
57 Bralo20 : You can also do serious damage with a glass, reason to ban all glass from flights? You can also do serious damage with flamable alcohol, reason to ba
58 soon7x7 : Fires burn Hot enough...why the need to toss some gasoline on it?. As a pilot I always carry a knife on my belt in case of a forced landing and I mus
59 Post contains images brilondon : Ah yes the illusion of freedom. Yes we should,but not for safety reasons but for reasons of good taste.
60 kalvado : Why would 2" knife on-board be considered more dangerous than a 2" knife elsewhere? Only reason I see is 9/11 type event; and that is not going to hap
61 gatorman96 : I can assure you, if someone attempts to hijack an aircraft with a 2.36" Swiss Army knife, they will first be laughed at, then beaten to a pulp (taped
62 kaitak : I agree with those who have said that no-one needs to have a knife on their person or in their hand baggage on a flight. I think this is a retrograde
63 boeingkid : Unreal that they are allowing knives but not bottles of water
64 PITingres : Because many if not most pocket corkscrews seem to include a stub knife that as of today falls afoul of the silly rule. I like to carry a pocket cork
65 gatorman96 : Although these scenarios are highly unlikely, I'm far more concerned about a bomb being fashioned out of a water bottle or some other type of liquid
66 Post contains images PC12Fan : Spot on. You put the idea of the possibility in the "nutters" head and there you go. I'm betting nineteen extremists took that into consideration. Be
67 Post contains images JONC777 : What if you just want to be able to defend yourself against someone who has one ??
68 b6a322 : Some of the comments on here really seem to remind me of the Monty Python bit "How to defend yourself using only a piece of fruit". Back to the main p
69 mia305 : I don't like the idea of that. A knife can cause damage regardless of length. Granted, we became more vigilant and made modifications after 9/11 but n
70 brilondon : That I believe is going to be lifted in January of next year.
71 FreshSide3 : You would think, though, with all the sophisticated screening devices at airports in this day and age, they would be able to detect what's in the bot
72 b6a322 : Yes, one would think. I just don't think the technology is fast and reliable enough to be there yet. Your same argument from above also applies here
73 kalvado : What exactly is going to be detected? Detection system is able to provide some idea of composition, so whatever is deemed real dangerous (oxidizers -
74 max550 : Most likely nothing during the traveling, but it's always nice to have at the destination. I used to throw one in my checked bag until I stopped chec
75 mia305 : It wouldn't pose no risk to the flight but a 2 inch knife can hurt and kill someone. I mean why take the chance of that happening.
76 Braybuddy : People do the strangest things . . . Hardly a compelling reason for allowing knives on board though.
77 kalvado : I suggest that you immediately surrender any sharp object located at your residence to police. That includes, but not limited to, kitchen knives, sci
78 kazim786 : That seems like a truly terrible decision.
79 Post contains images sankaps : Is use of the "T" word in non-threatening situations still banned though? (For example, "I am a United Super1K blogger just taking photos of the new
80 mia305 : Really, Really........ I'm just saying I don't like the idea. If people want to have a 2 inch pocket knife with them just check with you bag and get
81 PITingres : We're obviously not all connecting on what the security check is for. I don't get why some people expect to be personally safer on the airside of a se
82 kalvado : OK, so you don't have to dispose all the sharp objects - just send a check for $50 to a charity of your choice (is that what round-trip checked bag c
83 Post contains links and images Maverick623 : Exactly the reply I was gaming for And I'm willing to bet that thousands of non-extremeists stabbed someone yesterday. Does that mean I shouldn't be
84 manny : This is the most brain dead move i have ever heard of. You allow small knives which are the like the box cutters used by those cowards. But breast mil
85 Post contains images Maverick623 : As was said before, their are two reasons the hijackers succeeded in getting into the cockpit, and neither of those was "box cutters": they were a) n
86 PC12Fan : And yet it still happened, didn't it. A passenger aircraft isn't just anywhere. Regardless, nobody needs to make these points to make the TSA look st
87 mtnwest1979 : I wonder: If 9/11 events had never occurred , and for whatever reason the FAA* told the various security companies around the nation to start banning
88 Post contains images CaliAtenza : i got that black one for my girlfriend as a gift .
89 railker : I agree with the people on here agreeing that the ban should be upheld. While it may be a pain for some, those arguing that you can use anything for a
90 PITingres : Read the posts above. I have no use for a knife, or my corkscrew, on board -- but I don't always check a bag, and shouldn't have to (and pay another
91 Viscount724 : A broken wine bottle can do as much or more damage than a small knife.
92 denverdanny : My dad is a believer in carrying knives. He has a Swiss Army knife he's used for cutting candies, picking his nails, and opening mail. I'm sure it cou
93 Post contains links OB1504 : The former TSA chief has gone on record as saying that small knives are not enough, that axes and machetes should be okay, too: http://www.cnn.com/201
94 EnviroTO : Nude scans, taking off shoes and belts, being denied access to planes for name resemblance, etc is a sensible precaution but thankfully they will be a
95 mia305 : As I mentioned in the above post a person can snap for whatever reason mental, personal, being drunk or having a bad day. Granted it rarely happens bu
96 Post contains images Maverick623 : And your point is.... ??? It is to me. Sure, there's no place to just pull over and run away when someone goes nuts, but then again, that worked out
97 flyingturtle : I took a red army knife to JKH from ZRH (an Avro RJ85 or RJ100 flight), and they didn't object to that knife. By the way, it was also my first flight
98 DeltaMD90 : I'm surprised how fearful people are. I guess time will tell if this is a good idea or not. Having a knife, I have found, is convenient but no it is n
99 PC12Fan : No comment. Check please...........
100 EWRCabincrew : One thing to keep in mind, while it is an aircraft, a mode of transportation, it is our work environment. Our office, in a matter of speaking. That sh
101 PITingres : I'm quite certain that I could take a knife of the type being discussed into pretty much any office building in the country, possibly excluding publi
102 Post contains images antoniemey : The metro courthouse aside, pretty much all public buildings I've been in have no postings, screenings, or searches concerned with small knives. Guns
103 EWRCabincrew : I stand by that the aircraft is my work environment and not having yet another possible weapon on board is better in my eyes.
104 Post contains links LoveTheSkies : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ried-hijack-plane-armed-knife.html I guess my 1 in 4 chance of being the one targeted with these knives makes m
105 manny : If that was the case why did they wait soooooo long ? Considering most airlines strengthened passenger doors in the time after the event and the pass
106 ltbewr : How many 1000's of knives and similar sharp objects get by security now? I think part of this (along with some adjustments to the liquids bans/restric
107 aviateur : Couldn't have said it better myself. (See my post, #91, above). PS
108 wnflyguy : I'm still worried about snakes on a plane.
109 Maverick623 : They'll do just as much damage with the things already allowed on an airplane, if they truly want to cause a ruckus. Not that the TSA or DHS has ever
110 mia305 : There's a small article in our local paper that the ceo of Delta joins opposition to the knives. Miami Herald 3/9/2013 "Delta ceo Richard Anderson sai
111 JoeCanuck : There is no legitimate reason to have a knife on a plane. Sure, lots of other things, (which are available on aircraft), can be used on weapons but wh
112 airtechy : If you, along with many other people, have to catch a bus to get from the airport parking lot to the terminal, should you be allowed to carry these kn
113 Viscount724 : Small scissors are permitted and they're not much different than a small knife. I agree there's no need to use a knife on a flight but if you have on
114 Post contains images airtechy : You are missing the point. I have no use for the knife on the plane. I have a use for the knife and the other tools....sometimes 20 or more...that ar
115 atxpatriot811 : Sure they could injure a few, but with the way passengers now react to potential terrorists, it'd be less than a minute before the entire plane gives
116 aerorobnz : What is does show is how people are abusing the definition of hand carriage. It was designed originally to just be items you would use in flight, not
117 JoeCanuck : Tell that to the person with a knife in the carotid, or the chest. How about the 9/11 victims killed with a small blade? Regardless of whether or not
118 Glom : But as has been said, now you're getting into generic risks, not air travel specific ones. Why should air travel specifically be subject to security
119 JoeCanuck : What does it matter? Air traffic is already treated differently. You don't have tsa and scanners and marshals on trains or buses. Why are you so keen
120 PITingres : It's hard to fly a bus into a building and bring the whole building down. That's why the TSA screens aircraft and not buses and trains. It follows, o
121 DeltaMD90 : Why not nuclear bombs? Let's go the other way, let's not allow pencils... Are we really going to go down the slippery slope road? You look at an item
122 Post contains images KaiGywer : And all those items are allowed on planes already, hence I agree that banning small knives is stupid. Exactly. Do you ever walk down the street? Coul
123 Glom : Air travel is treated differently because of the unique risks associated with it. Once those are managed, that's job done for airport security. It wo
124 Post contains links avnut43 : The cartoonist Walt Handelsman, did a comic panel with a couple of TSA agents singing that it is safe to take knives on a plane, but no liquid. You ca
125 art : I don't see any need for pax to take a knife on board. Swiss army knives are multifunctional but which of the non-blade extras could pax need on board
126 Post contains images Unflug : That seems obvious because: Unfortunately you are missing the point. It is not the task of TSA to find out what someone might need in flight or after
127 art : OK, the test is whether something is a danger to the operation of a flight. If a small Swiss knife is not a danger now, how can it have been a danger
128 Unflug : a) Something that might have been a danger with open cockpit doors might not be a danger anymore today. b) If you don't allow risk assessment to come
129 KaiGywer : I have noticed that most of the people arguing "just put it in your checked bag" are from Europe. As many have posted earlier in the thread, a lot of
130 silentbob : The fact that some people are cheap should be irrelevant. Should someone be permitted to take a rifle or handgun so they don't have to pay to check i
131 Post contains images DeltaMD90 : I haven't checked a bag in years. So what's the big deal if I don't have a knife at my destination? What's the big deal about having a 2.36" blade on
132 KaiGywer : As pointed out before. A bullet will puncture the skin of the aircraft, hence jeopardizing flight safety. A 2.36" knife will not.
133 antoniemey : Cost. It costs money to check a bag in the USA. The only airline that is different is Southwest, and THEY include that cost into their ticket price,
134 JoeCanuck : Nope...I'm not missing a point, I'm making a different point. I don't see anything wrong about banning knives from planes....you take it as an affron
135 XT6Wagon : ok, seriously. How many people are mugged on a aircraft? Assaulted? Murdered? People seem to feel the need to ban everything, then demand others to ju
136 Unflug : But the point you make has no relevance in the decision whether lifting this ban is OK. Actually in my personal opinion there is nothing wrong with b
137 silentbob : Nope, but holding one to the throat of a passenger or crew member creates an serious problem in the aircraft. Has it happened before? I have no idea.
138 DeltaMD90 : Yeah but we can play that game with a ton of objects. Point still remains they are more or less harmless. I just read (not sure if it's true) that 7
139 exFWAOONW : Is it too late to buy stock in Prozac? I don't know how some make it through the day with all the potential horrors (swiss army knives) around them. K
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