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Why Don't Any US Airports Have Glass Jetbridges?  
User currently offlinemiami From United States of America, joined Sep 2012, 1142 posts, RR: 50
Posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16845 times:
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To me personally it's weird that none of the US Airports have glass jetways.

Does anyone know why US Airports don't have glass jetbridges?

It's weird that the new TBIT at LAX doesn't have glass jetways. Same with MIA's Concourse J and SFO's Terminal 2 for example.

Thanks for your replies!     


Aviation is proof that given, the will, we have the capacity to achieve the impossible. - Eddie Rickenbacker
58 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7560 posts, RR: 18
Reply 1, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16781 times:

From what I heard it was to save money and for security related reasons. Not sure the specs but I'm assuming they don't want anyone breaking the glass out and jumping in the airfield  


次は、渋谷、渋谷。出口は、右側です。電車とホームの間は広く開いておりますので、足元に注意下さい。
User currently offlinemia305 From United States of America, joined Mar 2013, 319 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16735 times:

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 1):

Exactly. Also it would probably be to costly to repair it every time it cracks or breaks.


User currently offlineswafa27 From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 49 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16744 times:

Ontario Intl (KONT) has a few glass jetways at both Terminal 2 and 4. They are pretty cool to board with, although they do get warm in the summer


ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co
User currently offlineJU068 From Vanuatu, joined Aug 2009, 2640 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16703 times:
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Quoting PHX787 (Reply 1):
Quoting mia305 (Reply 2):

Yes because in other places it occurs so often. Plus, if this reason was valid then I am sure other airports would be reluctant to introduce them.


User currently offlineB747forever From Sweden, joined May 2007, 17066 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16667 times:

Quoting swafa27 (Reply 3):

Must have not paid attention as I never saw any glass jetbridges at ONT when I flew out of there last month.



Work Hard, Fly Right
User currently offlinemia305 From United States of America, joined Mar 2013, 319 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16653 times:

All I was saying was when and if it does happen it would "probably be to costly".
I never said it happens a lot nor did I say it was the exact reason.


User currently offlineMcoov From United States of America, joined Jul 2011, 128 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16641 times:

Because no one cares. Liverys are one thing (which a number of people have been saying don't matter to the travelling public; they do), but a jetway with glass walls instead of metal is simply not a concern for most people, and is more expensive for the installer (installation, keeping it clean, repair, etc.) One only spends a minute or two in a jetway anyways unless something is significantly wrong, or you work with one.

More glass jetways will appear when terminals are fully rebuilt, as it's the current design trend (like Art Deco was during the 1920s and 1930s), but only then.


User currently offlineSWAFA27 From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 49 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16606 times:

Quoting B747forever (Reply 5):

They're the middle gates that are equipped with them at both terminals



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co
User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1882 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16595 times:
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Per NFPA 415 Federal regulations
"There shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway."



The only valid opinions are those based in facts
User currently offlinesulley From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 526 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16572 times:

Amarillo (AMA) actually has a new terminal with glass jet bridges.


In thrust we trust!
User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7560 posts, RR: 18
Reply 11, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16571 times:

Quoting JU068 (Reply 4):
Yes because in other places it occurs so often. Plus, if this reason was valid then I am sure other airports would be reluctant to introduce them.

I was being sarcastic.

Quoting FlyDeltaJets (Reply 9):
"There shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway."

/thread



次は、渋谷、渋谷。出口は、右側です。電車とホームの間は広く開いておりますので、足元に注意下さい。
User currently offlineB747forever From Sweden, joined May 2007, 17066 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 16571 times:

Quoting SWAFA27 (Reply 8):

I boarded from gate 403, so that might explain why I missed them.



Work Hard, Fly Right
User currently offlineADent From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1386 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 16454 times:

Per this thread: The US's Culture & Glass Jet Bridges (by Independence76 Oct 9 2012 in Civil Aviation) SBA a glass jetway.

User currently offlineCaspian27 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 382 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 16349 times:

The new terminal at SGF has glass jetbridges...


Meanwhile, somewhere 35,000 ft above your head...
User currently offlineAusA380 From Australia, joined Jan 2009, 310 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 16270 times:

ADL airport all air bridges are glass - great views when walking off the plane. Australia has very high building safety standards so I don't see it is a real safety issue. Doesn't appear to have been a maintenance issue there either.

User currently offlinebkircher From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 214 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 16171 times:

The new SBA terminal has glass jetways.

User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9386 posts, RR: 29
Reply 17, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 16143 times:

Quoting FlyDeltaJets (Reply 9):
"There shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway."

sounds like the eleventh commandment.

Did anyone tell the FAA that there is glass which an ordinary person cannot break just like that?

The cost argument I can understand in a country where most airports are run by the municipalities, but security? Those who can walk through glass can walk through concrete and metal as well. But Robocop and the like would not pass the TSA screening, or would they?



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineAA7295 From Australia, joined Aug 2007, 622 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 16064 times:

It's for fire safety reasons - both internal (say a fire breaks inside the aerobridge, less chance it spreading outside where there is fuel-loaded aircraft) and external (say a fire occurs outside, less chance penetrating inside the building.

User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9386 posts, RR: 29
Reply 19, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 16025 times:

Glass fills all these security requirements, otherwise it would not be used for the purpose. If fire protection would be a valid argument, there would not be any glass windows at anyairport.

As said, the only valid argument is cost.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlinereadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3264 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 15876 times:

Gatwick has a wopping great bridge.


Unfortunately, heat is seldom a problem in the UK.  



you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
User currently offlineCOSPN From Northern Mariana Islands, joined Oct 2001, 1619 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (1 year 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 15856 times:

It is to do with the US Fire code ..must allow for X number of mins in the event of a ramp fuel fire. so the pax can deplane and get inside the terminal....Im sure there is a way to have fireproof glass but that add Thousands per bridge, also some pax may be "scared" to walk though the jetbridge when they see the fire.. some of our US fire code experts can explain better..

User currently offline727tiger From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 270 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 15236 times:

Quoting Caspian27 (Reply 14):
The new terminal at SGF has glass jetbridges...

Partially. The SGF jet bridges are glassed in from the terminal to the ramp service towers, then standard metal from there out to the boarding threshold:



User currently offlineczbbflier From Canada, joined Jul 2006, 974 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 15108 times:

Quoting FlyDeltaJets (Reply 9):

Per NFPA 415 Federal regulations
"There shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway."

Wow. Clearly, the US government is waaaay too big and intrusive. What a great argument for making the government smaller. Is there really a need to be concerned about this? (It's a non-partisan comment, so no political digs. We're not in non-av.   )


User currently offlinexcoaster1 From United States of America, joined Nov 2009, 52 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 14818 times:

Here's a shot of KAMA's from inside SWA 737:

Big version: Width: 2592 Height: 1936 File size: 1812kb


[Edited 2013-04-03 08:15:29]

User currently offlineckfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5238 posts, RR: 1
Reply 25, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 15569 times:

Quoting czbbflier (Reply 23):
Per NFPA 415 Federal regulations
"There shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway."
Wow. Clearly, the US government is waaaay too big and intrusive. What a great argument for making the government smaller. Is there really a need to be concerned about this? (It's a non-partisan comment, so no political digs. We're not in non-av. )

I see the point about fire safety. I would also imagine that with the propensity for many parts of the country to see high winds, severe thunderstorms, and tornadoes, that having no glass in the jet bridge makes for less possiblity of glass breaking, either due to wind itself or debris striking the glass.

By the same token, can you imagine how hot a glass jet bridge can get in the summer. I've been at airports, when it's 85 degrees or warmer on a sunny day. Sitting by the windows can be significatnly warmer than only a few feet away from the sunlight. A glass jet bridge, with little or no HVAC, would be roasting hot.


User currently onlinedeltairlines From United States of America, joined May 1999, 8902 posts, RR: 12
Reply 26, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 15446 times:

SBA has them in their new terminal.

User currently offlineflashmeister From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 2900 posts, RR: 6
Reply 27, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 16021 times:
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See this article from the National Fire Protection Agency for more on these standards. I was surprised to learn that the metal jetbridges have to withstand fire and provide an egress path for 5 minutes in the event of a spill fire. Could be hard for glass to meet that standard.

Personally, I don't really think that glass would be any more unsafe. And it looks SO much nicer...


User currently offlineWALmsp From United States of America, joined Sep 2010, 147 posts, RR: 0
Reply 28, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 15547 times:

Here are a couple pics of SBA's jetways being installed:
http://www.edhat.com/site/tidbit.cfm?nid=55425&showcomments=T



In memory of my Dad, Robert "Bob" Fenrich, WAL 1964-1979, MSP ONT LAX
User currently offline9lflyguy From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 167 posts, RR: 0
Reply 29, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 15383 times:

GRK has a glass jetbridge. We used it at Colgan once when the ramp was full.


My opinions do not represent the opinions of my company. They are solely the opinion of the poster.
User currently offlinerojo From Spain, joined Sep 2000, 2452 posts, RR: 9
Reply 30, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 15313 times:

Quoting sulley (Reply 10):
Amarillo (AMA) actually has a new terminal with glass jet bridges.

Yup. I was in AMA last month and all jet bridges are glass. Beautiful terminal for an airport in the middle of nowhere... LOL


User currently offlineairbusaddict From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 415 posts, RR: 0
Reply 31, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 15201 times:

FSD has one glass jet-bridge, and I think plans are to at some point get more. It's basically the same jet-bridge that AMA has (the one that xcoaster1 posted), but brown, as the terminal itself is brown.

They're pretty impressive, actually, but I'm sure they cost a boat load of money.



Finally F9! FSD-DEN 7-4-2011
User currently offlineUSAirALB From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 3079 posts, RR: 2
Reply 32, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 14675 times:

At ALB, WN uses a dual-jetbridge system, with one, standard jetbridge for the front of the plane, and a glass jetbridge to the rear of the plane. It's pretty cool to use the one that goes to the rear of the plane, as the jetbridge gets pretty close to the wing, and you get a nice view.


E135/E140/E145/E70/E75/E90/CR2/CR7/CR9/717/732/733/734/735/73G/738/739/752/753/762/772/319/320/321/333
User currently offlineB747forever From Sweden, joined May 2007, 17066 posts, RR: 10
Reply 33, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 14165 times:

Just came to think about if LAX had glass jetbridges spotters at Imperial Hill would be able to see PAX boarding the airplane. That would have been fun!


Work Hard, Fly Right
User currently offlineAirlineCritic From Finland, joined Mar 2009, 710 posts, RR: 1
Reply 34, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 14032 times:

... the real reason is that the airport design was finished in the 1950's, and since there has not been any reason for interior, exterior, materials or any other changes.

  


User currently offlinenkops From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 2665 posts, RR: 6
Reply 35, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 13729 times:

Quoting 727tiger (Reply 22):
The SGF jet bridges are glassed in from the terminal to the ramp service towers, then standard metal from there out to the boarding threshold:

ACY has the same exact set up on 2 of their gates (5 and 6)



I have no association with Spirit Airlines
User currently offlinelightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13130 posts, RR: 100
Reply 36, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 12454 times:
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Quoting Mcoov (Reply 7):
ublic; they do), but a jetway with glass walls instead of metal is simply not a concern for most people, and is more expensive for the installer (installation, keeping it clean, repair, etc.)

That was my first concern. Cost. Fixing the seals on the windows (on a movable assembly) and the cleaning.

Quoting Caspian27 (Reply 14):

The new terminal at SGF has glass jetbridges...
Quoting PanHAM (Reply 19):
As said, the only valid argument is cost.

I concur. But dang it:

Quoting FlyDeltaJets (Reply 9):

Per NFPA 415 Federal regulations
"There shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway."

Our government has become too big.  
Quoting readytotaxi (Reply 20):
Unfortunately, heat is seldom a problem in the UK.

   True. But that bundles in with cost (air conditioning).

Quoting AirlineCritic (Reply 34):

... the real reason is that the airport design was finished in the 1950's, and since there has not been any reason for interior, exterior, materials or any other changes.

You are onto something there...  


Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlinejcded From Switzerland, joined Jan 2004, 213 posts, RR: 1
Reply 37, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 11857 times:

Just to clear a few things.
NFPA is not a US Government Agency, it is a private association that writes recommendations, what they write has no force of law. It is up to local fire officials, notably the fire marshall to give ok on the construction and they take into account NFPA recommendations, many of them adopt these recommendations as force of law in their own jurisdictions. Lots of communities have been able to get the fire marshalls to give an ok, I think that's a good thing. Cost also comes into play not only for installation and maintenance, but due to HVAC concerns especially in sunny climates. It becomes a greenhouse.



You breathe to do good and have fun.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25338 posts, RR: 22
Reply 38, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 9207 times:

Answer is very simple. They cost more and require more maintenance. For example, windows require cleaning. And passengers only want to board and deplane as quickly as possible and have no interest in paying higher airport taxes to cover such needless luxuries. The airports should be spending money on things that are more meaningful to passengers.

User currently offlineBoeing717200 From United States of America, joined Jan 2013, 856 posts, RR: 0
Reply 39, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 9128 times:

Quoting FlyDeltaJets (Reply 9):
Per NFPA 415 Federal regulations
"There shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway."

This. You can have an extension that is glass with no issues, but the unit that contacts the aircraft cannot be unless it can withstand a burn for a specified amount of time. Cant remember what the burn time is. NFPA is a recommendation, but the local fire marshal generally won't go against it.

Quoting czbbflier (Reply 23):
Wow. Clearly, the US government is waaaay too big and intrusive. What a great argument for making the government smaller. Is there really a need to be concerned about this? (It's a non-partisan comment, so no political digs. We're not in non-av. )


Has to do with burn time. A few have been approved, but they carry a nice premium for the glass.

[Edited 2013-04-03 15:21:03]

User currently onlineQatarA340 From Qatar, joined May 2006, 1848 posts, RR: 9
Reply 40, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 8992 times:

I think its a bigger fire hazard if the walls were NOT GLASS. If there's a fire and there are glass walls, at least you could smash the glass to escape. Being enclosed in a metal tube during a fire is certainly NOT SAFE.


لا اله الا الله محمد رسول الله
User currently offlineN328KF From United States of America, joined May 2004, 6485 posts, RR: 3
Reply 41, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 8980 times:

PAE:





[Edited 2013-04-03 15:36:04]


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User currently offlineBoeing717200 From United States of America, joined Jan 2013, 856 posts, RR: 0
Reply 42, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 8941 times:

Quoting QatarA340 (Reply 40):
I think its a bigger fire hazard if the walls were NOT GLASS. If there's a fire and there are glass walls, at least you could smash the glass to escape. Being enclosed in a metal tube during a fire is certainly NOT SAFE.


Takes longer to heat steel than it does glass, plus you can't see the fire which makes you more likely to keep moving. These two issues are why the NFPA recommendation hasn't changed in decades.


User currently offlineczbbflier From Canada, joined Jul 2006, 974 posts, RR: 2
Reply 43, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 6635 times:

Quoting jcded (Reply 37):

Just to clear a few things.
NFPA is not a US Government Agency, it is a private association that writes recommendations, what they write has no force of law.

Thank you. Learned something. It's a relief that it's not "the government" after all.

Quoting Boeing717200 (Reply 39):
You can have an extension that is glass with no issues, but the unit that contacts the aircraft cannot be unless it can withstand a burn for a specified amount of time. Cant remember what the burn time is. NFPA is a recommendation, but the local fire marshal generally won't go against it.

Another interesting factoid. Thanks.

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 38):
The airports should be spending money on things that are more meaningful to passengers.

Actually, glass jetways would be something very meaningful to passengers. I am not a claustrophobic person but I sure feel closed in walking down the longer versions of these tubes. They feel smaller than a DHC8-200!


User currently offlinetharanga From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 1865 posts, RR: 1
Reply 44, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 6600 times:

Quoting czbbflier (Reply 23):
Wow. Clearly, the US government is waaaay too big and intrusive.

the NFPA is not the US government. it is the professional association of fire protection people.

Quoting jcded (Reply 37):
NFPA is not a US Government Agency

correct.

Quoting jcded (Reply 37):
what they write has no force of law. It is up to local fire officials, notably the fire marshall to give ok on the construction and they take into account NFPA recommendations, many of them adopt these recommendations as force of law in their own jurisdictions.

to be fair, the federal government can also adopt industry codes and standards. Some googling suggests that maybe the FAA does (or did) either suggest or require that NFPA 415 be followed.


User currently offlinelightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13130 posts, RR: 100
Reply 45, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 6460 times:
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Quoting N328KF (Reply 41):
PAE:

That is a NICE jetbridge!

Quoting jcded (Reply 37):
NFPA is not a US Government Agency, it is a private association that writes recommendations

Oops. I feel foolish. But their recommendations probably help set insurance rates...

Quoting Boeing717200 (Reply 39):
NFPA is a recommendation, but the local fire marshal generally won't go against it.

That too.   But I think insurance rates would matter just as much.

Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlinerfields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 31
Reply 46, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 6377 times:

Quoting czbbflier (Reply 23):
Clearly, the US government is waaaay too big and intrusive.

The US government has nothing to do with the NFPA.

It is an INTERNATIONAL association to promote fire safety, though focused in the US.

It has NO REGULATORY AUTHORITY. The 'regulations' are not enforceable.

However, there is a strong economic enforcement of NFPA code - by the insurance industry.

Not complying with NFPA can make it impossible to obtain insurance, or at least very costly.


User currently offlinewingnutmn From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 643 posts, RR: 0
Reply 47, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 6032 times:

FSD has one, and it is a sauna in the summer. Unbelievably hot compared to a metal one. To me it is unnecessary. But then again, nobody asked me.

Wingnut



Any landing you can walk away from is a good landing! It's a bonus if you can fly the plane again!!
User currently offlineBeardown91737 From United States of America, joined Jun 2011, 542 posts, RR: 0
Reply 48, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 5073 times:

The glass jetbridges at ONT are partial. The glass section is stationary and it is over a roof on gates 205,206,207, and 405, 406, and 407. The 4xx gates are WN's.

I didn't find any photos on a.net but you can see them on google maps if you zoom in to the birdseye angle. When looking at T2, 201 is an RJ gate with no jetway all the way on the left. The gate with the OO CRJ in UA tulip scheme is 202.



135 hrs PIC (mostly PA-28) - not current. Landings at MDW, PIA, JAN.
User currently offlineAusA380 From Australia, joined Jan 2009, 310 posts, RR: 0
Reply 49, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 4522 times:

See webcam from Adelaide Airport (ADL) which shows their transparent airbridges.

http://www.adelaideairport.com.au/ai...rs/south-australia#terminal-webcam



User currently offlineteneriffe77 From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 470 posts, RR: 0
Reply 50, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 4168 times:

Speaking of jet bridges why don't many European/asian airports use jetbridges for regional jet flights (CR7's E-145's etc). Also I can see why glass jet bridges wouldn't work in my hometown of SYR as we get the extreme ends of temperatures throughout the year.

User currently offlinenycdave From United States of America, joined Aug 2010, 547 posts, RR: 1
Reply 51, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3993 times:

Two thoughts:

1) HA! Love that some posters, as usual, automatically leapt to the government bogeyman being the root of all evil. I need to start blaming "big government" for anything I don't like... would make life so much simpler.

2) Only mentioned a couple times, but greenhouse effect would seem to be a big problem for lots of US airports installing them. Can only imagine how much higher than air conditioning costs would be in a place like PHX or LAS... Anyone have examples of extensive use of glass bridges in sunny/hot climates (other than gulf, where oil money lets you spend whatever you want on anything for any reason)?


User currently offlineluckyone From United States of America, joined Aug 2008, 2172 posts, RR: 0
Reply 52, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3937 times:

Quoting QatarA340 (Reply 40):
If there's a fire and there are glass walls, at least you could smash the glass to escape. Being enclosed in a metal tube during a fire is certainly NOT SAFE.

It is likely anything that is capable of breaking glass would be considered a weapon and difficult to impossible to get through security. Not to mention once it's broken you then have to jump straight down, potentially injuring oneself onto a tarmac covered with broken glass and possibly flammable and/or ignited fluids.


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25338 posts, RR: 22
Reply 53, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 3731 times:

Quoting teneriffe77 (Reply 50):
Speaking of jet bridges why don't many European/asian airports use jetbridges for regional jet flights (CR7's E-145's etc).

The airlines don't want to pay for the costs of the major terminal changes that would require.


User currently offlineHayseuss From United States of America, joined Feb 2013, 8 posts, RR: 0
Reply 54, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3645 times:

SAN glass jetbridge being installed at Gate 51 as part of the T2 expansion:
Glass jetbridge being installed at SAN as part of T2 expansion


Hayseuss


User currently offlinebpat777 From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 416 posts, RR: 0
Reply 55, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3554 times:

At LGA, AA has 2 or 3 even numbered gates that are partially glass. They look very old however.

User currently offlineSANMAN66 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 795 posts, RR: 2
Reply 56, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3476 times:
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Quoting Hayseuss (Reply 54):
SAN glass jetbridge being installed at Gate 51 as part of the T2 expansion


I have been looking at that picture closely, that doesn't look like a jetway,
it looks more like a bridge possibly leading out to the actual jetway itself.It don't
quite look like the glass jetways that are at the few airports that have them.
The jetbridge looks stationary,(there's no wheels beneath it or machinery on it
enabling it to swing around and connect to the planes using that gate.)



Quoting nycdave (Reply 51):
Can only imagine how much higher than air conditioning costs would be in a place like PHX or LAS...


And all the pax cooking inside those glass jetways in 100+ degree summertime heat!

[Edited 2013-04-05 18:17:21]


PSA Gives you a lift!
User currently offlineHayseuss From United States of America, joined Feb 2013, 8 posts, RR: 0
Reply 57, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 3434 times:

Quoting SANMAN66 (Reply 56):

I believe the reason you don't see the wheels or machinery is because the picture was taking while the bridge was actually being installed. SDIA has the picture on their Facebook page with the following text:

"Installed this week as part of The Green Build at SDIA was the glass jet bridge, which will connect Gate 51 to waiting planes. As passengers walk across the bridge to or from their flight, they'll see unobstructed views of the airfield on one side and San Diego Harbor on the other - an excellent hello or goodbye for anybody."


User currently offlinepnwtraveler From Canada, joined Jun 2007, 2241 posts, RR: 12
Reply 58, posted (1 year 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 3426 times:

Quoting FlyDeltaJets (Reply 9):

Per NFPA 415 Federal regulations
"There shall be no transparent or translucent walls, windows, or surfaces, other than those windows located in the ramp access service door and in the cab area for the purpose of operating the aircraft loading walkway."


For the same reason Transport Canada won't allow glass windows in ships below rescue routes to inflatable life rafts. So Ferries for example that use rescue chutes and have had previous windows on car decks covered over with metal and the glass removed to give extra time for escape time. Different areas have different standards.


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