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SQ Flight Hits Heavy Turbulence En Route To LHR  
User currently offlinelonghaul67 From Norway, joined Jan 2007, 248 posts, RR: 1
Posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 17433 times:

Tried to search the forum, but could not find anything about this incident.

Singapore Airlines flight SQ308 experienced moderate to severe turbulence en route from Singapore to London on 26 May.

The plane hit turbulence shortly after breakfast was served, and the result was culinary carnage.

Eleven passengers and one crew member sustained minor injuries when the aircraft experienced a sudden loss of altitude and were attended to by medical personnel on arrival at Heathrow Airport.

Article from cnn.com: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/06/05/tr.../index.html?hpt=travel_hp_blogroll

Surely this A380 must have been knocked around and fallen more than just those 20 meters?

43 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinerampbro From Canada, joined Nov 2012, 203 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 16732 times:

Sounds like no matter what you ordered, you got scrambled eggs for breakfast on that flight.

User currently onlinemotorhussy From New Zealand, joined Mar 2000, 3181 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 16483 times:

Wonder what the impact was in premium classes with heavier crockery and cutlery on the loose?!

Hate to be showering in an EK A380 and experience that kind of rough-and-tumble.



come visit the south pacific
User currently offlinen92r03 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 338 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 16486 times:

Fox News reported here in the US that many pax helped the cabin crew clean up the mess and that all pax received a box of "high end" chocolates upon arrival in LHR. Classy move by both the pax and SQ.

User currently offlinesolarflyer22 From US Minor Outlying Islands, joined Nov 2009, 1040 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 15566 times:

How strong must the turbulence be to really move an A380? I would imagine very.

User currently offlineEK413 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 4905 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 14951 times:

Great to see SQ brighten up the day for passengers The mess was cleaned up soon after and passengers were given chocolate gifts on landing in London.

EK8413



Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. We are tonight’s entertainment!
User currently offlineflyenthu From United States of America, joined Dec 2012, 350 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 14049 times:
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Great to see smiling pax on landing. I can't imagine how scary it might have been. Seems like super intense clear air turbulence to have that kind of an impact on a mammoth plane like the A380. It is also a testament to how strong airframes are actually.

User currently offlineChazPilot From United States of America, joined Feb 2011, 80 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 13464 times:

The gift chocolates upon arrival is a very nice move by SQ. Nothing would sooth my turbulence jitters like a few luxury Belgian chocs. melting in my mouth. Luckily my wife works for Godiva!

User currently offline757Guy From United States of America, joined Jun 2013, 19 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 13372 times:

What was the equipment type?

User currently offlineDreadnought From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 8825 posts, RR: 24
Reply 9, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 13200 times:

Quoting longhaul67 (Thread starter):
Surely this A380 must have been knocked around and fallen more than just those 20 meters?

20 meters like a drop off of a 6 story building.



Veni Vidi Castratavi Illegitimos
User currently onlinevivekman2006 From India, joined May 2006, 536 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 12520 times:

Quoting 757Guy (Reply 8):

What was the equipment type?

It was an A380, registration 9V-SKH.


User currently offlineProst From United States of America, joined Oct 2012, 982 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 12299 times:

Turbulence doesn't give a rats a$$ about manufacturer.

User currently offline757Guy From United States of America, joined Jun 2013, 19 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 12174 times:

Damn that would be scary seeing the wings shake so much seeing how solid they are on the ground, I don't want to find out how flexible they are in the air due to turbulence.

User currently offlineaaron747 From Japan, joined Aug 2003, 8123 posts, RR: 26
Reply 13, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 11771 times:

^
Or this one: http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19930331-0

Some turbulence out there is just plain nasty. Enjoy those mountain wave rotors folks.



If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
User currently offline23booker From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2013, 7 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 11056 times:

Dear all,
This is my first post to airliners.net, so I hope this provides a little insight.
I have been a fan of this site for many years, but decided today was the day to make the leap and become a member.
As a passenger on SQ308 last Sunday seats 38C and 39B. My wife and I witnessed first hand what was a interesting experience!
In photo number two of the CNN report, we are sat two rows in front of the chap in the white t-shirt.
On photo number 8, it is actually my wife an I laughing as we were handed a box of chocolates (me in the white t-shirt, my wife just in front of me in the black top).
To give you a first hand account of what happened.....a little different to the media version, everything was progressing normally with the flight from Singapore, and we had been warned of possible turbulence a couple of hours after departure.
Breakfast had just been served (a choice of noodles or scrambled eggs with chicken sausage), both of which we declined the offer of, when the pilot asked the cabin crew to take their seats, but not abruptly as reported.
As passengers, we had already been restricted by the seat belt sign for approximately ten minutes.
A couple of minutes after the crew sat down, the aircraft veered upwards slightly before plummeting straight down for a couple of seconds.
Every meal tray smashed into the ceiling, showering all passengers in food, broken glass and cutlery (of which SIA still use metal as opposed to cheap unusable plastic utensils). Thankfully we had opted out of the food service, as did the passenger in 38A, so we escaped being covered in cornflakes, eggs and noodles. I was hit by a half eaten bread roll and a smidgen of yogurt, whilst my wife took a chicken sausage to the foot and some scrambled eggs filled her shoes (which somehow ended up in the aisle), all of which confirmed why we decided not to eat!!
The aircraft was a complete mess, people were screaming, crying and generally panicking. A couple of people stood up in our section of the cabin, which I suppose is a natural shock reaction, but a few of us shouted at them to sit back down.
A chap two rows in front of us had some kind of travel bag around his neck which ended up a row behind us in the aisle. I remember him having it as he had earlier walked past with a spoon poking from the top of it. This signals how sudden and violent the drop was.
Within two minutes of the incident, the cabin crew came through the cabin checking everyone was ok, there were several announcements for them to exercise caution whilst doing so, and they were just brilliant.
Then the monumental clean up operation took place. The crew spent an hour or so wiping every surface down, logging any injuries and reassuring everyone that it will be ok.
The flight continued back to blighty in the usual manner, no further problems to report, and the captain said they had, and were constantly reassessing the situation.
He explained that we were routing round some large storm clouds in the region, some were about 70-100 metres from us, and we hit CAT, no warning and nothing he could do to avoid or know it would happen.
Upon arrival, we all had to wait for the paramedics to assess every injured passenger (most complaining of neck pain!!) and then we were handed the box of chocolates as in picture 8 at the end of the air bridge.
Personally, I fly the LHR-SYD route 5 or 6 times a year (and take over 100 flights (mostly long haul) in general due to work). The Bay of Bengal is always choppy, but this was rather extreme, and I simply cannot stress enough how brilliant the SIA crew were once it had happened. Their cool calm attitude managed to ease the situation (although I fear it will be a struggle getting my wife on another plane), and the way handled things and cleaned the plane was above and beyond the call of duty.
Hats off to you SIA!!
FLYENTHU..... Thanks for the comment about everyone smiling. As my wife was handed the chocolates I commented: "here have some chocolates, please don't sue us" at which point everyone burst out laughing. Nothing brings 350 people together like a near death experience!
Regards all.
A
Btw, my two take home comments from all of this, Alan Cross who took the photos, I took one of the coffee on the ceiling and he said "yeah that was mine, I am wearing the other half", and after been given the chocolates, a female passenger said to my wife "I can't wait to get home and wash the cornflakes out of my hair". Somehow it made the whole thing seem 'a matter of fact'.


User currently offlinechiawei From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 944 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 10890 times:

I flew on 9V-SKH on SQ1 back in Feb this year.

Glad everyone was ok.


User currently offlineZKSUJ From New Zealand, joined May 2004, 7092 posts, RR: 12
Reply 16, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 10724 times:

Quoting 23booker (Reply 18):

Good story with some great insight. I'm just a little bit suprised they carried on to LHR when this happened early-ish into the flight with still hours to run (At least that's my understanding)


User currently offlinesankaps From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 2255 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 10209 times:

Quoting 23booker (Reply 14):
Their cool calm attitude managed to ease the situation (although I fear it will be a struggle getting my wife on another plane), and the way handled things and cleaned the plane was above and beyond the call of duty.

Well done, SQ crew! Proving yet again that safety and service are not mutually exclusive!


User currently offlineKarelXWB From Netherlands, joined Jul 2012, 11211 posts, RR: 33
Reply 18, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 10092 times:

Great story 23booker, thanks for sharing!

Quoting 23booker (Reply 14):
As passengers, we had already been restricted by the seat belt sign for approximately ten minutes.

You all were very lucky, imagine what would happen if no one has its seat belt on  Wow!



Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity. And I'm not sure about the universe.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21442 posts, RR: 54
Reply 19, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 9550 times:

Quoting solarflyer22 (Reply 4):
How strong must the turbulence be to really move an A380? I would imagine very.

No, not necessarily stronger than for a smaller airplane, since it's got proportionally larger wings, so turbulence has comparatively more area to act on as well. Larger masses of air are interacting with larger masses of airplane so the total amount of energy exchanged is higher, but for each passenger there isn't necessarily much of a difference.

Quoting Dreadnought (Reply 9):
20 meters like a drop off of a 6 story building.

It's primarily a matter of the acceleration, not amplitude. A 100m drop is no issue on approach because the acceleration is low and steady enough. And even just a 20cm pothole in the road can be really nasty if you're hitting it in a car with a stiff suspension.

Quoting 23booker (Reply 14):
As a passenger on SQ308 last Sunday seats 38C and 39B. My wife and I witnessed first hand what was a interesting experience!

Interesting account. I'm glad nobody got hurt too seriously.


User currently offlineTheAviator380 From UK - England, joined Feb 2013, 401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 9124 times:

Surprisingly no one mentioned which region and alt. there were at when they hit this nasty turbulence? Has any one got any info of this? Also next day SQ 308 was cancelled, any one know reason for that? I was first to start a thread on this I guess but never got published properly because of site IT issues.

User currently offlinebwest From Belgium, joined Jul 2006, 1368 posts, RR: 4
Reply 21, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 8611 times:

Quoting 23booker (Reply 14):

Thanks for that interesting account.

And njam, Guylian fruits de mer, definitely among my favorite chocolates!  

When I first saw the pictures a few days ago, I joked, saying those two SIA girls had a "I'm not cleaning that up" look. Now I guess it's more a "damn, I'm gonna have to clean that up" kinda look.

Good to hear there were no major injuries and SQ handled it in a professional way, as you would expect from them.



I love my Airport Job! :)
User currently offlinefalkerker From Seychelles, joined Apr 2012, 162 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 7152 times:

KUDOS to the SIA crew and the passengers!
Many criticize SIA crews for being robotic but when time comes for safety and reassurance they are evidently top notch! It doesnt cease to amaze me that even after such an event, passengers were smiling and to hear such an account from 23 booker and seem he is really pleased with SIA and its crew is amazing!

I guess that same turbulence in a smaller aircraft would have had a proportional effect, but being in such a behemoth must have made it much more frightening.


User currently offline23booker From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2013, 7 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 7091 times:

Quoting ZKSUJ (Reply 16):

We had about 10hrs and 15 mins still to run. The decision was taken after assessing the situation that the plane was fine, and the injuries only very slight. Most complained of neck pain, which had amazingly cleared up by the time we landed and the paramedics were doing their checks!

Quoting KarelXWB (Reply 18):

The chap in 37G didn't. An old fellow already using a walking stick, and with limited mobility. The lady next to me commented that she saw him levitate out of his chair. He hurt his ankle and tore his trousers on the base of the seat in front of him. Apparently his was the worst injury, but he was still able to move around the plane later, and was smiling/chatting with the SIA crew.

Quoting TheAviator380 (Reply 20):

We were at cruise level (34-35,000ft) approximately 2 hours out of SIN somewhere in the region of the
Adaman and Nicobar Islands, over the Bay of Bengal. No idea why the SQ308 was cancelled the next day, I know 9V-SKH was delayed by 28hrs leaving LHR for the return leg (if you saw the food stains covering the entire cabin I am not surprised). Also, correct me if I am wrong, but I think they have to do a complete check over of the aircraft when this happens?? I spoke with the guys in the SIA lounge when I flew out this Monday to YVR (always favour the SIA lounge over the London Lounge to get my last meal before being insulted for ten hrs with what AC refer to as food, benefits of the SIA Gold Card), and they said all the passengers had been found seats on BA, QF and EK, so minimised the disruption to others.


User currently offline23booker From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2013, 7 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (1 year 2 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 6982 times:

Quoting falkerker (Reply 22):

Thanks for the reply.
You know the funny thing, nobody remembers exactly how bad the turbulence was, EVERYBODY, including my wife who hates flying at the best of times, remembers how brilliantly SIA dealt with the situation.
Like I mentioned, I fly to Australia about 5/6 times a year, usually use a mix of SQ and QF ( to keep both the gold cards going), from now on, there is only one choice for me for that route, SIA!!


25 falkerker : That is exactly what has me completely astonished! Usually people would be panicking and in therapy for a couple of months! You have decided to give
26 flyenthu : Quoting 23Booker "He explained that we were routing round some large storm clouds in the region, some were about 70-100 metres from us, and we hit CAT
27 Post contains images TheAviator380 : Excellent 23Booker. Thanks for sharing this experience, must be thrilling. Bay of Bengal is absolutely crazy and very well known for nasty weather an
28 23booker : It's probably just the way my crazy mind works! Ha ha ha Thanks for the question. It's an interesting point about the pilots, no they didn't. I thoug
29 TheAviator380 : Cheers ! Yes pilots must have been busy with checking all system working properly or not fair enough. Hope your next flight will be without any hiccu
30 cmf : It is actually a very common reaction. No-one like when things go wrong but we all (almost) know it will happen from time to time. What sets companie
31 L0VE2FLY : Well done SQ, some CATs hit out of the blue, lucky for them they knew about it and were prepared. Imagine if an EK A380 hits a sudden CAT with a coupl
32 azjubilee : Sounds like the cabin crew did a great job. But did the pilots? This is the part that bothers me. If the pilots were deviating around CBs, the turbule
33 sankaps : Perhaps the pilot was misheard or mis-spoke, and what he really meant was 70-100 KM? That seems much more logical and plausible.
34 azjubilee : Let's hope that's the case!
35 23booker : That's a very fair comment. We only saw the cabin crews reaction to the event, so had no idea how we got into the situation in the first place. The c
36 23booker : Having flown that route so many times (in excess of 100 when combined on BA, QF and SQ), it isn't that uncommon to look in wonder out the window at c
37 azjubilee : Well then... wether it was 7-10 meters or 7-10 KMs, it's clear the pilots were working the plane around CBs. Therefore, it was likely the CBs that cr
38 Post contains links 23booker : That's brilliant, thanks for the explanation. It sounds more plausable to me. Obviously I am not a pilot, but an absolute plane freak, and fly a hell
39 sankaps : This I agree with. The fact that the captain has crew suspend service and be seated just prior to this suggests as well that this was not CAT, it was
40 zeke : Not clear at all, we review sig wx forecasts before departure, that can tell us when to expect CAT ahead f time, and at what levels.
41 motorhussy : Need clear air to hit CAT. Clearly this wasn't the case. I remember as a child flying from Dulles to Orly in 1973, can't remember whether it was TWA o
42 Post contains links dirktraveller : Hi 23Booker. Thanks for sharing your first-hand experience with us in the A-net. Based on your accounts of the incident, the SQ crew was really profes
43 spacecadet : You weren't there, so you have no way of knowing. CB clouds don't cover 100% of the sky. There are individual cells spaced miles apart. Pilots usuall
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