Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
What Are Those "CUPS"....During Test Flights?  
User currently offlineBelleayre85 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (14 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 1300 times:

Hey Aviators  ,
I was always wondering about the test flights. I noticed that all of the planes durning test flights have this "cup" thingy that they drag behind them on the vertical stablilizer or tail and at the cone at the end of the plane. What is that used for? Does it help show something? Can I have some explanations?   Thanks!

Simon Oh yea, Where can I get some kind of subscription to a magazine about Airlines and Boeing and Airbus.......etc.

4 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTriStar From Belgium, joined Oct 1999, 848 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (14 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 1221 times:

The two major mags would be Airliners (http://www.airlinersonline.com/) and Airways (http://www.airwaysmag.com).

Hope that helps,

TriStar.

PS: Sorry, I am clueless on the "cups" you mentioned. For your sake, I hope Buff reads your question. I bet you ten bucks he has the answer. ;-)


User currently offlineLeo-ERJ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (14 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1209 times:

About the "cone" you asked, I think you are talking about the protection of the tailsection in minimum take-off speed tests. Refer to this quote that I posted earlier and it describes what kind of test it is used for. It is basically used for fuselage protection.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Various tests are performed
for this condition for any aircraft in the world. This falls into a major
category of the so-called "test-flights", and in this case the testing is
being in regard to the resistance of this occurence to the aft fuselage
of the aircraft. The aircraft takes-off at the minimum possible
speed(kts-relevant to aircraft conversion) until the tailcone section
physically touches the runway, creating large amounts of friction.
However, the cone section is protected for testing purposes with specific
resistive materials. During the test, the aircraft produce enough speed
to rotate and create an enormous positive angle of attack, but does not
generate enough lift force to take-off until the very last stages of V2.
Until then performance will be recorded in various ways and data must be
carefully analyzed so that errors will not happen in a case like this.
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Basically it is attached to the tailsection to prevent it from touching the rwy. and damaging.

Cheers.
Leo-ERJ


User currently offlineBoeingrulz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 481 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (14 years 11 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 1201 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Those cones that are trailed behind the tail of the plane are used to measure ambient air pressure so that all measurements of air pressure throughout the plane can be measured against the ambient pressure.

The thing attached under the tail section during maximum rotation tests are called tail skids and keep the tail section from being dammaged.



User currently offlineSkylinepigeon From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (14 years 11 months 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 1183 times:

In order to calibrate the airspeed indicator and altimeter of an aircraft it is necessary to know the static pressure of the air at the altitude the aircraft is flying. A line is trailed behind the aircraft long enough to measure the static pressure of 'free air' - in theory, unaffected by the aircraft itself. The 'cup' you mention is called a 'trailing static cone', and its purpose is to stabilise the pressure line behind the aircraft.

The static pressure measured at the trailing line is compared with that measured on the aircraft (by its pitot-static tubes or static ports on the fuselage side) in order to carry out the calibration. The same calibration is then applied to other aircraft of the same type.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Urgent! What Are Those Things Called They Hold Wh posted Tue Oct 17 2006 02:14:10 by Flamedude707
Has There Been Any Problems During Test Flights? posted Wed Oct 26 2005 19:19:26 by B777A340Fan
What Are Those Black Signs On The Runway? posted Tue Jul 8 2003 07:46:33 by Flyboy80
What Are Those Things That WN Has At Their Gates? posted Mon May 29 2000 17:06:51 by JWM AIRTRANS
What Are "scabs" In The Airline Industry? posted Tue Aug 9 2005 18:29:32 by ArmitageShanks
What Are "clean - Dirties"? posted Fri Jul 9 2004 16:17:03 by Ghymes
RJ145 Underwing "blades": What Are They For? posted Thu Apr 8 2004 20:07:13 by Aguilo
What Are The "real" Hiring Minimums? posted Tue Jul 31 2001 18:11:20 by Josh1
What Happened To "secure Cockpit Suites"? posted Sat Jul 22 2006 08:29:04 by Lredlefsen
Are Hubs Making A "comeback?" posted Fri Jul 7 2006 15:40:39 by 7E72004