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Naming Aircraft  
User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 719 times:

I have noticed that a lot of Eurpoean/Asian/other countries' airlines seem to like to name their jets. I have noticed that only some U.S. carriers name jets, and then those jets are usually the heavies that fly to other countries. Examples would be NW's 747s - "City of Detroit" and "City of Tokyo".

Why don't more U.S. carriers name their jets? Why is it so popular to name jets in other parts of the world?

They could name a Tower Air jet the "Hunk o' Junk"  

But seriously, I think it would be good for the carriers in this country. What do you think?


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFLY777UAL From United States of America, joined May 1999, 4512 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 638 times:

It's good in a sense that it shows all of your "worldly" destinations, but to tell you the truth, I haven't a clue as to why they stopped naming their planes.

Almost all of the US Airlines named their planes...UA had the "Mainliner (Chicago, New York, etc.)", AA had the "Flagship (Tulsa, Dallas, etc.)" Piedmont with the "(Los Angeles, Philly, etc.) Pacemaker"...

I guess it must have been an fad in the early days of flying, and it's "out of fashion" now...?!  

FLY777UAL


User currently offlineKaitak From Ireland, joined Aug 1999, 12395 posts, RR: 37
Reply 2, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 634 times:

I agree its a good idea, but you must remember, US airlines have big fleets - how do you think of names for 212 AA MD80s or 400 US Air Airbuses?

European airlines, almost without exeption (although AF, AY and all of the low cost carriers come to mind) name their aircraft and some have different "themes". Iberia's 747s are named after famous writers, while LH aircraft are named after cities or provinces in Germany. I think it adds a nice touch. I do like UA's idea of naming their aircraft after customers AND EMPLOYEES (PARTICULARLY) as it gives customers a loyalty incentive and employees a recognition for good work. And what better way to be recognised than having your name on a plane which will be in the fleet for 20 + years!


User currently offlineAwaramper From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 118 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 634 times:

Southwest has named a few of their 737's. I see one called the "Spirit Of Kittyhawk" a few times a week at SMF. A lot of people don't know that Horizon Air, out of SEA, has named all of their Dash8's. FedEx is another company that has started to name some of their planes. From what I have heard, FedEx actually uses employees childrens names. Can anyone at FedEx back that up? But I agree, more carriers should name their planes. It would be interesting to see the different names the companys would come up with.

User currently offlineAlphastrike From United States of America, joined Feb 2011, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 630 times:

Well, i know of a Winnipeg based airline, actually they shipp cargo. They are called Winport Aviation and fly shipping to China with their 747-100. It's named "Spirit of Winnipeg"

User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Reply 5, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 630 times:

Certainly they'd want to name planes after their headquarter city or something that the city is well known for. Doesn't Delta already have "Spirit of Atlanta"?

Continental could go with "City of Newark" and "Houston", which on their jets that go overseas would be great publicity for those cities.

Southwest has lots of names, including "Lone Star". America West wouldn't have trouble coming up with names of western cities.

UAL could go with something that has "rocky mountains" and/or "Denver". "Spirit of the Rockies"??

These days I have noticed that airlines are lending their names to sports arenas so they could tie in to money-making events. Like the United Center, or the brand new American Airlines Arena in Miami opening in January. Its sad that we only think about $$$ in this country. AA has a big hub in Miami - they ought to put that on one of their planes.



Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineCanadian747400 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 629 times:

In Canada, Canadian Regional and Air Ontario name their planes after cities that they fly to. Even though they have more planes than destinations, they use some city names on more than one plane. I think that they decide which city name will be on more than one airplane by which city has more flights. For instance, there will be more Air Ontario's with the name "City of London" than "City of Sarnia". Also, before CP became Canadian Airlines, they had named their 747s "Empress of Italy" and "Empress of Buenos Aires", and a few others which I don't remember. I really like the idea of airlines naming their planes, and I wish that more airlines would do this.

User currently offlineWoxof From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 627 times:

Happy Thanksgiving everyone.
FedEx names all their trunk aircraft (about 310 at last count) via random drawing of active employees childrens names. A certificate is given to the child with a picture of the actual aircraft with their name on it. They will only select one name (ie: if there is already a Billy and you submit you son Billy, you're out of luck).
The aircraft will keep its name until it is painted then it receives a new name...


User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Reply 8, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 626 times:

What if the plane named "Billy" crashed? I would think that would give Billy some emotional trauma knowing that the plane named after him crashed and was destroyed! Just a thought....

Its interesting that a freight carrier like Fedex names its jets but most carriers in the U.S. that carry the pax don't! I would think it would be the other way around.

And Happy Thanksgiving to all you aviators & enthusiasts.



Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineSQ2 From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 75 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 623 times:

Happy Thanksgiving everyone! I feel that the naming of planes a very good and nice idea. I have flown on City of Perth (Qantas) and Kuantan (Malaysian Airlines) just to name a few. I do agree that I usually look at the nose of the aircraft for names and get disappointed when there isn't. As for Singapore Airlines, I believe they don't name their planes for a simple reason that they are such a small country that it is an island city and state rolled into one!

But yes, I do feel that aircrafts should be named and naming of aircrafts sounds to me to be a very good idea!

SQ2



SQ always my 1st choice
User currently onlineLN-KGL From Norway, joined Sep 1999, 1001 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 623 times:

Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) give all their planes a first and last name. The last name is common for all - "Viking", but the first name is either an old nordic male or female first name. I'm proud to have one of the SAS planes to bear one of my first names "Gorm" MD-82 Registration no. OY-KHT, Serial no. 53296, Fuselage no.1937, Domestic version, delivered November 20 1991. This naming of aircrafts has been done since the startup of SAS, and the viking relation could also be seen in the old livery (pre mid 70s) with motive from a viking ship bow (the dragon head). If you're interested in the names of the aircrafts, look under Fleet in the following URL: http://www.sasflightops.com/
"Gorm den gamle" (Gorm the old) was one of the first Danish viking kings, and ruled from 860 - 936.
Also the Norwegian Braathens have used names from the vikings, like the first Norwegian king Harald Haarfagre.

Regards,
Kurt GORM


User currently offlineShorts330 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 621 times:

KLM has given this some thought. Their 767s are named after famous bridges from all over the world. KLM MD11s are named after famous women in history. Some 747classics carry names of aviation pioneers. KLM 744s are named after destination cities. I think this is not a very original idea. Some of KLMs 737s have names of historic Dutch sea pirates, some with a very bloudy reputation. Now that's a cool idea. By the way: all KLM aircraft have the words 'The Flying Dutchman' on the fuselage.

About the FedEx principle: I think aircraft once named should keep their name for the rest of their service.

So to the U.S. carriers: start naming those machines but think of something better than geographical names.


User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Reply 12, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 614 times:

That's good. But I really wondered why the U.S. carriers got away from that in the first place when it seems the rest of the world is doing it.

Let me re-phrase that. WE got away from it domestically. Some of our planes are named that go to your countries, but not here.

I wish there were some airline executives reading these posts...to take the concept the rest of the world thinks is good.

Actually I remember Pan Am named their planes after Clipper Ships, but then most of those were 747's or Airbuses that went overseas.



Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineGardermoen From Australia, joined Jul 1999, 1520 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 614 times:

I think Qantas have stopped naming their planes. Can anyone confirm this? I have seen three QF jets at Perth - 2 767s and 1 737 witout names.

User currently offlineFLY777UAL From United States of America, joined May 1999, 4512 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 617 times:

Yea...I guess everyone forgot about Pan Am...

Each and every one of their planes had a great "Clipper _____" name...THOSE were origional!

FLY777UAL


User currently offlineAl From Australia, joined Jun 1999, 593 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 612 times:

Qantas name their International fleet after cities in Australia. (Ironically, it just *had* to be City of Darwin that went for a round of golf in BKK recently - Darwin is probably our most incident prone city, what with being bombed in WW2 and basically wiped out by Cyclone Tracey in '75) The domestic fleet is, as far as I'm aware, not named any longer. Australian Airlines (nee TAA) that was purchased by and absorbed into Qantas in the early 90's, used to name their fleet after famous Australian explorers/pioneers.
In another International "quirk" they have very very cleverly "branded" their 747-400 fleet as "Longreach" (as well as an individual name for each craft.) The name Longreach has a clever twofold purpose - it recognises the long legged capability of the 744 aircraft as well as paying homage to the history and early days of Qantas from it's first main "hub" in the 1920's at the town of Longreach in Queensland. The Qantas jet base at Sydney is named the Arthur Baird Jet Base to recognise the man who had control of Qantas maintenance for many years and who forged the reputation for maintenance and technical issues that Qantas now enjoys. The entire fleet also has titles at the front of the craft under the windows. These have changed quite often over recent years - after the absorbtion of Australian, the title read
"The Australian Airline", which neatly managed to include the TAA capitals as well as the word Australian which acknowledged the history of the domestic airline they had just bought. Lately, they've gone back to one of the original titles "Spirit of Australia". Needless to say, the front of the 744's can look a little messy with an individual craft name (City of xxxx), the Longreach title, the Qantas name and the Spirit of Australia signage!
Are you sorry you asked now, Gardermoen???!!!!!! :-) Cheers. Al.


User currently offlineGundu From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 612 times:

I can tell you SQ names their planes, the 744 is called Megatop,743 BigTop,742 Super B,772 Jubilee,773 same as 772, 343 Celestar but there is no name for the 313.


Happy Post-Thanksgiving!!


User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5042 posts, RR: 16
Reply 17, posted (14 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 610 times:

I don't know - there's just something wierd about a jet named "Big Top".      


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
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