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GOL 737 (PR-GGY) Engine Doors Separate After GRU Takeoff  
User currently offlineReffado From Brazil, joined Feb 2012, 226 posts, RR: 0
Posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 8545 times:

Today, a GOL Boeing 737-800 suffered an uncontained engine failure after takeoff from Rio de Janeiro's SDU airport, and was forced to cancel the flight to CGH and land in Rio's GIG airport. According to a press release, the aircraft landed safely after one of the engine cowlings detached during flight, and none of the 67 passengers on board were injured. The aircraft will undergo maintenance and an investigation will be conducted to discover the cause of the incident.



EDIT: The aircraft in question is PR-GGY, and was performing flight G3 1700.

[Edited 2014-03-08 11:22:15]

22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5767 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 8189 times:

Um, that's not an uncontained engine failure.
Who's calling it an engine failure??? I haven't seen that anywhere.
The cowling blew open, as happens quite frequently on the A320.
See AvHerald:
http://avherald.com/h?article=47114eae&opt=0


User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6182 posts, RR: 30
Reply 2, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 8025 times:
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I´m confused. Did the cowling opened because there was an uncontained failure or the cowling just opened? An uncontained failure of an engine upon T/O at SDU would be pretty scary. But what exactly was this?


MGGS
User currently offlineZKCIF From Lithuania, joined Oct 2010, 296 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 7973 times:

67 passengers on 738? sounds sad for beancounters  

User currently offlineReffado From Brazil, joined Feb 2012, 226 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 7973 times:

I apologise for the incorrect text. First info I gathered had stated "engine failure". Has now been corrected, and was in fact just the cowling blowing open.

Brazilian Air Force is reporting there was ice formation in the engine, according to this article: http://g1.globo.com/rio-de-janeiro/n...s-peca-se-soltar-em-pleno-voo.html

[Edited 2014-03-08 12:49:48]

User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6182 posts, RR: 30
Reply 5, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 7876 times:
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Quoting Reffado (Reply 4):
First info I gathered had stated "engine failure". Has now been corrected, and was in fact just the cowling blowing open.

Still, any issue with an engine at SDU is bound to be newsworthy, what with that airport being so marginal. I remember taking off from there many times and it was a very interesting experience. I also had an excellent view from my office window form a building at Rio Branco street.



MGGS
User currently offlinePyrex From Portugal, joined Aug 2005, 3983 posts, RR: 28
Reply 6, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 7854 times:

Wow. Can't imagine anything scarier than an engine failure on take-off from SDU. I know that they need to do the math to be able to withstand situations like this, but taking off from that tiny, tiny runway straight against a massive mountain and suddenly losing half your power sounds pretty nerve-wrecking,


Read this very carefully, I shall write this only once!
User currently offlineReffado From Brazil, joined Feb 2012, 226 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 7788 times:

A lot of misinformation in the initial report. Update, now sources are saying the flight never originated from SDU, but from GRU, and suffered the incident while on approach to SDU. Diverted to GIG because of longer runways. I am confused now as to what to believe.

User currently offlineliftsifter From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 312 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 7360 times:

Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 1):
The cowling blew open, as happens quite frequently on the A320.

Why are you mentioning the A320, when the aircraft in question is a 737? Let's not make this into A vs. B, please.

This is actually the first time I've seen a photo of an engine cowling violently pulled off. Interesting, but certainly could be dangerous.



A300 A310 A319 A320 A321 A332 A333 A342 A343 A346 A380 B738 B744 B763 B772 B77W B787 Q400 E190
User currently offlineEXMEMWIDGET From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 211 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 7038 times:

Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 1):
Um, that's not an uncontained engine failure.
Who's calling it an engine failure??? I haven't seen that anywhere.
The cowling blew open, as happens quite frequently on the A320.
See AvHerald:

With both engine cowlings blown open and holes in the engine housing, that would appear to be an unconfined engine failure.


User currently offlinewxmeddler From United States of America, joined Mar 2014, 37 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 6966 times:

Looks like both sides of the cowling was torn off violently... Perhaps a blade off in the compressor?

User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6182 posts, RR: 30
Reply 11, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 6541 times:
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Quoting liftsifter (Reply 8):
Why are you mentioning the A320, when the aircraft in question is a 737? Let's not make this into A vs. B, please.

Because, it has happened often on A320s, so what´s your point? He is not saying anything that is false. I´ve never heard it happen on a 737.



MGGS
User currently offlinePlanesNTrains From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 5502 posts, RR: 29
Reply 12, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 6370 times:

IINM there are pics of just such a thing happening in flight on AirTran (FL) several years back.

-Dave



Next Trip: SEA-ABQ-SEA on Alaska
User currently offlinescbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12473 posts, RR: 46
Reply 13, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 6257 times:
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Quoting AR385 (Reply 11):
it has happened often on A320s

Define "often". I'm aware of three such incidents.

Not that the manufacturer of the plane has ANYTHING to do with it given it's an engine issue.



Time flies like an arrow, but fruit flies like a banana!
User currently offlinedexswart From South Africa, joined Aug 2012, 505 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 5610 times:

Quoting liftsifter (Reply 8):
Why are you mentioning the A320, when the aircraft in question is a 737?

Because they're similar aircraft in similar roles, used in a similar region to the aircraft in particular. I assume that's why, at least. Probably to dispel or try to dispel the usual A.net hype around a relatively common occurrence.

Quoting liftsifter (Reply 8):
Let's not make this into A vs. B

Once again, probably not his intention. The whole "A vs. B" thing is stupid anyway, they're both lovely aircraft and do their job well.


Now, was there any damage to the wing or not? The cowling ripped up, which is how they open on a 73. How long should the damage take to repair?



Durban. Melbourne. Denver.
User currently offlineSLCGuy From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 163 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 5340 times:

Well, at least we can give A320 cowlings/nacelles credit for leaving the aircraft cleanly since they do it regularly. B737 cowlings look like they flop around and come apart which might be a bigger deal, if it happened more often!

[Edited 2014-03-09 05:11:46]

[Edited 2014-03-09 05:23:16]

User currently offlinePowerman57 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2013, 3 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 5125 times:

Quoting scbriml (Reply 13):

In almost every case on modern powerplants, the nacelle, nozzles, pylon etc are all the design responsibility of the airframer, not the engine manufacturer.

From the photos available, this looks like a release of the fan cowl door latches thus allowing the doors to open and deform around the fancase. There does not seem to be any evidence in these photos of released core debris. Compressor blade failures are, in my experience, almost always contained within the engine casings. Therefore this does not fall into the category of an uncontained engine failure.


User currently offlinealnicocunife From United States of America, joined Mar 2011, 163 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 4514 times:

Was the engine even shut down? The fan looks OK. It really looks like just the cowling was left open or became that way during takeoff. Even if a pneumatic duct is blown, correctly closed cowling will stay together. Anything further aft (turbine section) would not cause the fan cowls to be damaged as the T/R's take the brunt of the impact damage. The high pressure compressor section has smaller blades and less rotating mass and they rarely if ever come out of the case.

User currently offlinena From Germany, joined Dec 1999, 10680 posts, RR: 9
Reply 18, posted (5 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 4427 times:

Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 1):
The cowling blew open, as happens quite frequently on the A320.

Oh really? You better give examples before posting such accusation. Never heard that this a "frequent A320 problem". And I am sure its false, at least the adjective.


User currently offlineSA7700 From South Africa, joined Dec 2003, 3431 posts, RR: 26
Reply 19, posted (5 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3799 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 1):
The cowling blew open, as happens quite frequently on the A320.
Quoting na (Reply 18):
Oh really? You better give examples before posting such accusation. Never heard that this a "frequent A320 problem". And I am sure its false, at least the adjective.

I don't wish to become embroiled in a flamefest and I don't believe it was user [ AA737-823 ]'s intention to start a flamefest. It has happened before - it is merely an observation. Please see the following:

A320 Losses Engine Cowlings During Takeoff? (by Mr Spaceman May 13 2004 in Tech Ops)

A320 Cowl Latches Overlooked Reason. (by HAWK21M Jun 16 2013 in Tech Ops)



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Jose Ramon Valero - Iberian Spotters
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Jose Ramon Valero - Iberian Spotters


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ron Nantes



And most recently on BA's G-EUOE (24 May 2013 - BA762)


Yes it is unsettling, but it can happen on any aircraft, be it Boeing, Airbus, Embraer, etc.

Thanks and regards,

SA7700



When you are doing stuff that nobody has done before, there is no manual – Kevin McCloud (Grand Designs)
User currently offlineTancrede From Finland, joined May 2006, 245 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (5 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3427 times:

Quoting AR385 (Reply 11):
Because, it has happened often on A320s, so what´s your point? He is not saying anything that is false. I´ve never heard it happen on a 737.

Can you be more specific about how "often"? twice a week, three times every month.
Funny but since the 90's, I am flying on A320, it has never happened to me. I must be very lucky.


User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6182 posts, RR: 30
Reply 21, posted (5 months 2 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1946 times:
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Quoting Tancrede (Reply 20):
Can you be more specific about how "often"

Please look at reply 19. which I take as a subtle warning from the moderators.

But for your benefit, here you go:

of·ten
[aw-fuhn, of-uhn; awf-tuhn, of-] Show IPA
adverb
1.
many times; frequently: He visits his parents as often as he can.
2.
in many cases.
adjective
3.
Archaic. frequent.
Origin:
1300–50; Middle English oftin, variant before vowels of ofte oft

Related forms
of·ten·ness, noun

Synonyms
1, 2. repeatedly, customarily. Often, frequently, generally, usually refer to experiences that are customary. Often and frequently may be used interchangeably in most cases.



MGGS
User currently offlineRubberJungle From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (5 months 2 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1909 times:

Quoting scbriml (Reply 13):
Define "often". I'm aware of three such incidents.

At the time of the BA A319 event in May 2013, Airbus had recorded 35 similar incidents.


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