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Another A300-600 F/A Dies  
User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 2627 times:

"A Tunisair cabin crew member fell to her death when she opened the door of Airbus Airbus A300-605R TS-IPB at Djerba. A steward who also fell from the plane was seriously injured. Possible incomplete depressurization is being investigated."

Very similar to the AA A300-600 incident on November 20th last year, when a male F/A fell from the airplane after he opened the door while it was presurized.

Regards.

36 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineFly_emirates From United Arab Emirates, joined Oct 2000, 1046 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2188 times:

Oh boy!

we operate A300's on our fleet.. and i fly many times on them.. at least once every week! I think i should take care when i open the door next time!!!!


User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2120 times:

Didn't the NTSB/FAA issue any ADs after the AA incident?

User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 3, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2063 times:

Are these airports at a high altitude then? Because surely the pressure in the cabin should be kept at the pressure on the ground?



User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2042 times:

No, the is presurized when it lands, despite of the altitude, but is slowly depresurized within (of after) 30 seconds of the landing. In the AA incident, circuit breakers tripped throughout the flight and when it landed, it wasn't depresurized. The captain realized this and didn't deplane. However, a fire warning light came on and he told the F/As to evacuate. An F/A opened door L1, and the door was blown out, along with the F/A.

Wonder if the same thing has happened again?


User currently offlineCorey777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2019 times:

How could the door be opened under pressure? I though the shape of the door prevented this.

Corey777


User currently offlineN17085 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2008 times:

On heavies, aren't the doors controlled electrically with the console like 5 feet away from the actual door?

User currently offlineStrickerje From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 723 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1996 times:

The doors on Boeing aircraft and newer Airbus aircraft are built like plugs, so they must be pulled inward slightly before swinging outward. This prevents a door from being opened while the pressure inside the aircraft is higher than the outside pressure. The doors on the older Airbus airplanes do not have this safety feature though; they just swing outward and have a huge latch to hold up to the pressure, so they can be opened while the aircraft is still pressurized. Hope this explains it!

-Jeffrey S.


User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1996 times:

N17085, not nessecarily. Only on the L1011, DC-10, MD-11 and 767.

Corey777, yes, but when there's a little bit of presure, it may be enough to be able to open the door, but may still cause a lot of damage when the plane decompresses.


User currently offlineYak42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Reply 9, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1827 times:

In the AA A300 tragic incident, was the door actually blown completely off.

User currently offlineRabenschlag From Germany, joined Oct 2000, 1007 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 1788 times:

I am quite sure that the pressure in a plane is kept at the pressure of approx. 10.000 ft. This would mean the following:

above 10.000 ft youd be blown out of the plan if the door was opened.

below 10.000 ft. youd be blown into the plan if the door was opened.

I highly doubt that below 10.000 ft there is a higher pressure within the plane compared to outside.

regards, rabenschlag


User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1780 times:

http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001212X22314&key=1

So, the answer to your questions is yes.


User currently offlineSpitfire From France, joined Feb 2001, 801 posts, RR: 7
Reply 12, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1759 times:

On landing the cabin pressure is maintained to 200 feet BELOW the landing altitude in order to avoid some bumbs of pressure during the flare. Then slowly the outflow valves open completly to unpressurize the airplane (normaly... in this cases it seems something went wrong). On the Airbus A340-A330, there is a light on the door, just below the small window, which tell the cabin crew and/or the ground personal if the a/c is unpressurized (light out).


Sabena ... Never to be forgotten (12 years already , what a shame !! )
User currently offlineLMML 14/32 From Malta, joined Jan 2001, 2565 posts, RR: 6
Reply 13, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 1724 times:

On A320 and A310, the types I have flown, the doors are equipped with a light as mentioned above. This however does not prevent the door from being opened. It simply indicates that the cabin is not fully depressurised. Admittedly, I hardly ever look at this light when opening the door. My primary concern has always been to ensure that the slide is disarmed before opening the door. From now on I will try to remember to look at the pressure light while opening the door.

User currently offlineYak42 From Ireland, joined Oct 2000, 801 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 1684 times:

Wow, does anybody know if this is likly to happen in other aircraft or is the A300 just particularly prone to this kind of accident. I know the Tu154 has the same type of door.

User currently offlineFedExIndy From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1632 times:

At FedEx we fly the A300/A310 and they have told us to never completely close the plane while it's on the ground for fear that it will pressurize. They require that the aft bulk compartment door be left open until the plane is ready to take off. I don't know if this has anything to do with what you are talking about.

User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 1628 times:

Any more cases of an A300/A310 being inadvertantly presurized on the ground?

User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3700 posts, RR: 34
Reply 17, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1629 times:
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The doors on the older Airbus airplanes do not have this safety feature though; they just swing outward and have a huge latch to hold up to the pressure - all Airbus's have plug doors.

User currently offlineDc10hound From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 463 posts, RR: 5
Reply 18, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1575 times:

"In the AA A300 tragic incident, was the door actually blown completely off."

The door and door frame sustained some damage, but the door remained attached to the aircraft. It was ferried to Tulsa for final repair.





"Eagles soar. But weasels never get sucked into jet intakes.."
User currently offlineCharliecossie From Germany, joined Oct 2001, 479 posts, RR: 9
Reply 19, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1553 times:

Why was the door opened when no steps/air bridge were in position?
Asking for trouble......


User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11153 posts, RR: 59
Reply 20, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1557 times:

Just some FYI. Aircraft are pressurized to an altitude of 8,000ft. usually.

Regards.



"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
User currently offlineDc10hound From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 463 posts, RR: 5
Reply 21, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1551 times:

"Why was the door opened when no steps/air bridge were in position?
Asking for trouble......"

They were expecting to use the Emergency Escape Slides...





"Eagles soar. But weasels never get sucked into jet intakes.."
User currently offlineDc10hound From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 463 posts, RR: 5
Reply 22, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1538 times:

"Just some FYI. Aircraft are pressurized to an altitude of 8,000ft. usually."

This statement is correct. On the A300-600 normal pressurization differential pressure (outside vs. inside pressure) is 8.4 PSI and cabin altitude is not allowed to exceed 8,000 feet during flight.






"Eagles soar. But weasels never get sucked into jet intakes.."
User currently offlineTeva From France, joined Jan 2001, 1871 posts, RR: 16
Reply 23, posted (12 years 9 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1460 times:

A300 and 310 have a red light on the door , just above the handle.
It is part of the F/A duties to check it . If light is on, aircraft is pressurized.
FedexIndy, I never heard about this.
As far as I know:
- You cannot operate main cargo door at the same time as any of the belly doors, because they are all on the same hydraulic system, and there would be insufficient pressure (in the hydraulics)
- Aft bulk is alwways the last one closed. It is always kept open as long as possible for last minute freight.
Hope this helps.
Nana...



Ecoute les orgues, Elles jouent pour toi...C'est le requiem pour un con
User currently offlineFly_emirates From United Arab Emirates, joined Oct 2000, 1046 posts, RR: 9
Reply 24, posted (12 years 9 months 22 hours ago) and read 1398 times:

: Spitfire and LMML 14/32,

the A300-600 that we operate on Emirates, has the same lighting feature.. but same here, i just check that the slide is disarmed then i open the door, i dont look at the light ! but i started to


25 Ts-ior : I do confirm this piece of news. Some passengers were also injured. The flight originated from Monastir and made a stop over Djerba as a part of a co
26 Post contains links 777236ER : It was at http://www.aviation-safety.net I hope the f/a recovers. Regards
27 Fly707 : why dont they make automatic doors ?? I think it would be safer .
28 De727ups : I just got checked out on the A300-600 door during recurrent training. There is a flashing red light on the door that tells you when the door is not s
29 Ts-ior : Thanks ! I've no information concerning the steward ! I hope he's recovering !
30 Teva : De727ups, UPS 300s are not different than the passenger ones (or the Fedex ) In fact, the same light is also present next to the handle that allow you
31 PANYNJ : Ts-ior, curb your enthusiasm!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
32 Ts-ior : WHAT'S THIS ???
33 BAsteward : The "modern" airbusses that i have operated on (A340, A319, A320) have a red flashing "Cabin Pressure" light on each door. It flashes when the doors a
34 Teva : BAsteward, as I said in my 2 previous replies: Yes, A300 and A310 DO have the light. But as Fly_Emirates said, quite often people do not check it. Nan
35 Braniff727 : I remember either reading about this or seeing something on a news program. I guess there is some sort of insilation in the rear of the cargo hold tha
36 BAsteward : Teva, Thanks. I can believe people not checking something else but not this. On the A340, 320 and 319 these lights arew approx three inches by 1 inch
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