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Rules Of Conduct For Non Revs  
User currently offlineLMML 14/32 From Malta, joined Jan 2001, 2565 posts, RR: 6
Posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 1730 times:

Do airlines publish a rules of conduct for their staff when travelling as non-revs and/or duty?

29 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineTeahan From Germany, joined Nov 1999, 5290 posts, RR: 62
Reply 1, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 1647 times:

Hello,

What do you mean by publish? Do you mean it as make availible to the public or mean it as rules that employees must fellow.

Anyway, there are plenty rules, about publishing them for the public, I don't know.

Jeremiah



Goodbye SR-LX MD-11 / 6th of March 1991 to the 31st of October 2004
User currently offlineCeilidh From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 1641 times:

Yes, of course.

User currently offlineLMML 14/32 From Malta, joined Jan 2001, 2565 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 1634 times:

Not publishing them to the general public. Internal memos. What I would like to know are things like:
1. Alcohol consumption
2. Dress code
3. Upgrades
4. etc.


User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13046 posts, RR: 78
Reply 4, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 1635 times:

BA tell their staff to dress 'causual, but smart'. No t-shirts, jeans or trainers. That sounds petty, it's designed to stop people turning up too scruffy, because they may be upgaded to Club, if ecomony is full.
Also, don't make excessive demands on the crew, don't get drunk, avoid telling revenue pax you're staff travelling on a freebie or 90% discount, and don't act up at check-in if you don't get a seat.
Pretty common-sense stuff really.




User currently offlineLMML 14/32 From Malta, joined Jan 2001, 2565 posts, RR: 6
Reply 5, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 1600 times:

Do staff "expect" to be upgraded simply because they are staff? What disciplinary measures, if any, are non-revs liable to face should they be reported for misconduct by the crew?

User currently offlineSkyhawk From United States of America, joined May 2001, 1066 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 3 hours ago) and read 1566 times:

Delta has a very specific dress code for NRSA. No jeans, if F/C no sneakers. Use to be worse, in the past women could not even wear slacks, or open toed shoes, had to wear stockings, men had to have a jacket and tie, children dressed appropriate to heir age. Drinking for "us" is allowed, but not to be overdone. Upgrading is fairly automatic if available, a lot of the time though the space is taken up by Frequent Flyers or F/C standbys.

User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13046 posts, RR: 78
Reply 7, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 1562 times:

The first step on the discipline ladder for BA is a written warning, sometimes stopping an increment too.
But for most staff travel related incidents, suspension of concessional travel for a year is often used.
More serious incidents could result in dismissal.


User currently offlineBoeingfan From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 385 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 1544 times:

GDB, most US Carriers follow the same rule.

Sometimes if using a physical ''pass" (most of our trips are electronic ticketing) there will be a sheet on the pass out lining the "do's, as well as the don'ts."

Buddy and parent pass disbursement and use are also the responsibility of the employee. If your 'buddy' or 'parent' acts up, you can get pulled in or even loose your priveledges for specific period of time of not less than three months to one year.

Fortunately the public is so much more abusive to the ticket, gate staff and flight attendants that mis behavior all too often goes unreported by them, the "next..." mentality. It is usually a fellow pass rider that will turn the offendor in about a month after the event.

You have no defense at that point, so rule is be very careful, it is a priveledge not a right.

Happy travels. See the world. But always have a backup for weather, and mechanical delays.

ciao Bf


User currently offlineBraniff727 From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 686 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 1534 times:

On NW

Pass Riders in Main Cabin must wear professional dress (no denim) socks and shoes must also be worn.

First Class requires a jacket.

Alcohol may be consumed just like any revenue passenger. Should a meal be served you must wait until all other revenue passengers receive a meal to ensure they eat before you do.

You can list yourself in First Class or Main Cabin. If you list in Main Cabin it is up to the FA's is they want to upgrade you or not, this is an unwritten rule.

Really there's not a whole lot aside from dress code and the meal thing that distinguishes a non-revenue passenger from a revenue passenger.



Climbing
User currently offlineKohflot From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 1523 times:

We don't have to wait to be served a meal on my non-rev airline of choice, but I always ask if there are enough meals before they serve me. That's never been a problem though, as they'll prevent people from getting on the plane or sitting in a particular class if they don't have enough meals.

Braniff727 pretty much said it right.. there's really not much of a difference when it comes to non-revving. But there are two big unwritten rules that keep you on the good side of gate agents.

1) Don't crowd the counter. Have a seat or stand a reasonable distance away until they call your name.. but when they do.. run. Heheh.. not quite, but I did have a guy take the last first class seat one time even though they called my name before his. He climbed over the seats to get to the counter..

2) Make sure you're listed standby before you get to the counter. A lot of agents have no problem with listing you, some do though.. and while they'll still do it for you, you get the obligatory grumble.

Happy travelling..


User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 1511 times:

>>it is a priveledge not a right<<

No, it is my RIGHT to travel non-rev. When I signed my contract to work for the airline, it was agreed that I would receive pass benefits.

To say that non-rev travel is a privilage is like saying your pay check is a privalege, and you should be grateful for it. Just as you earned your paycheck, so too you earn the right to travel non-rev.



Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently offlineRailmatt From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 212 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week 1 hour ago) and read 1497 times:

I know for AA they make it clear it is a privelege.

They publish a brochure about NRSA travel for non-revs called "Courtesy for the Privelege."


User currently offlineSkyhawk From United States of America, joined May 2001, 1066 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (12 years 5 months 1 week ago) and read 1480 times:

PanAm747-I think that you had better check on things with the company you work for and I'm sure they will inform you that contrary to what you are now thinking pass riding is not a right of employment, it is in every sense of the word a privelege. It can be taken away at a moments notice, no warning, just taken and there isn't anything you can do about it. I have seen this "right" taken away from more than one person in my days, so I would advise you to be careful with the attitude.

User currently offlineEg777er From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2000, 1834 posts, RR: 14
Reply 14, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1464 times:

Look good.

Behave well.

Don't get pissed.

Simple.

Certainly on BA anyway.


User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1460 times:

Skyhawk-

No I believe pass riding is labled as a benefit, just like medical benefits. They tell you in the interview that you will receive free/reduced travel, this helps you make a better job choice. If it was a "privilage" they shouldn't mention that in the interview.

It's kind of like if you went to work for a company and they said that you will be given a car when you start to work there. Then after you start your employment, they tell you that you have to pay for the car, wouldn't you be upset?

But really, I did behave well when I traveled non-rev. I was even "deplaned" so a paying pax could take my seat (this was even after the doors were armed and locked), but I never did anything. I just went to the airport chapel and started praying to the S-3 gods.

>>It can be taken away at a moments notice, no warning, just taken and there isn't anything you can do about it.<<

Yeah, they can also do that with your employment.

BTW, I don't work for an airline anyomre, I've since retired from the job.



Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently offlineDC-10inLB From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 140 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1453 times:

You must list yourself. And never count on getting where you need to go when you need to go. Dress accordingly of course, no denim, t-shirts or dirty shoes. Expect to be the last on. Depending on the airline they will upgrade you. Delta is very good about upgrades providing there is room in the Biz-Elite cabin. As well with United, you list yourself specifically in a class and will be put into that class provided there is room. It is always best to be seen and not heard. I've never had any problems non-reving, never been pulled off a flight either. Only one time I was on a flight when I was told that there may not be enough meals, and they asked me if it was ok if they went around adn served the passengers first. It was very nice how the Delta employees were with me, they didn't just say, there's not enough food, sorry. In the end there were enough meals and they came back to feed me. There are plenty of times when it took me a while to get home, sitting in airports waiting for flights with an opening, or going to a city with more space on a flight to connect through to my final destination.

User currently offlinePhlflyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 851 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 1450 times:

In one sense, it is a benefit, but it is a benefit you can loose if you do not follow the rules. I would imagine that if you ask all of your airlines senior mgt. they would tell you it was a privledge.

When I was working for JM, I knew of a few people who had lost the privledge due to abuse.


User currently offlineAdam84 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 1400 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1432 times:

Choose wisely who you give your buddy passes too and or get concession travel for. Tell them to kiss up to airline crew and to not screw around.

I recently turned in a fellow travelling on a hotline fare (he was friend of a staff member in LON). He was pissed because his flight was delayed a few hours, he was demanding an upgrade to club and was complaining on how bad BA is. Sure enough I printed his PNR and gave it to my supervisor who reported it.


User currently offlineCo LITE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1421 times:

It can be found on most ticket jackets specially designed for non-reving passengers.

User currently offlineCaptaingomes From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 6413 posts, RR: 56
Reply 20, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 1398 times:

I was recently laid off from Canada 3000 and I was formerly with Royal Airlines. At Royal, cabin crew deadheading on duty would up automatically upgraded to business class space permitting, on a seniority basis. With Canada 3000, we weren't allowed in the business class at all. In fact, even Angus Kinear, C3's CEO always travelled in economy class.

Behaviour is important, if we wanted alcohol, we'd have to pay for it, even in business class, and also we'd have to dress appropriately, no jeans, no open shoes, the normal stuff.

The main difference with Royal and C3 was really the upgrading of cabin crew to business class, where at C3 it was forbidden and at Royal it was automatic for deadheading crew on duty.



"it's kind of like an Airbus, it's an engineering marvel, but there's no sense of passion" -- J. Clarkson re: Coxster
User currently offlineLMML 14/32 From Malta, joined Jan 2001, 2565 posts, RR: 6
Reply 21, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 1381 times:

The system mentioned by Co-Lite that there is a special ticket jacket for staff makes a lot of sense. I too know of people who have lost their pass privileges when they abused it. I agree that it is not a right. It is only a privilege which can be taken away. With my airline most people behave ok. Beleive it or not it is pilots travelling on passes (not duty travel or positioning) that are a pain. With my airline upgrading is not automatic unless you are on duty travel. So when pilots are travelling on vacation they expect to be upgraded. And the situation can be awkward. Especially since most of them do not request an upgrade at check in and then board and expect it from the cabin crew, who have no official authority to do it. Personally I have no qualms upgrading colleagues. The unwritten rule is that, especialy if you are aircrew (pilot or fa) NEVER ASK FOR IT. It will be probably offered to you anyway (on your airline at least). I even offer an upgrade to people I don't like because I don't want to discriminate. But some people really piss me off. Like recently when a pilot travelling with his foreign "partner" broke all the rules to try to impress his companion at our expense. I am glad that I stood up to him and taught him a lesson. And do you feel that you get the worse treatment from check in staff at your home base? I know I do.

User currently offlineN175dz From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2000, 274 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 1358 times:

Delta have a rather neat ticket jacket given to with ticket for people travelling on Friends and Family passes. That explains all the rules - but as has been said above, it's all common sense stuff. Am doing it (hopefully!) tomorrow.

One point though - it does explain very cleary that a failure to follow the rules could result in diciplinary action for the member of staff who provided the ticket.

cheers, Phil.


User currently offlineLowfareair From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 1345 times:

PanAm747: It is a priviledge. If it was a right, it couldn't be taken away from you. You have a RIGHT to recieve a paycheck. If you act up, they can't say "We are suspending your pay, but you will still work." The PRIVILEDGE to fly is based on good behavior. It is similar to having a vending machine in our student lounge at school. If we abuse the PRIVILEDGE, the machine is turned off for a short while as punishment.

User currently offlineAirsicknessbag From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 4723 posts, RR: 34
Reply 24, posted (12 years 5 months 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 1322 times:

Even rights can be taken away from you - ever heard of jails?

Daniel Smile


25 LMML 14/32 : Jails would be a little out of context here. The job itself is your right to work but that too can be taken away from you. it boggles my mind how fool
26 PanAm747 : Lowfareair- But did they specifically tell you that "We here at XXXX Univeristy have a vending machine, whereas the people at XXXX State do not. There
27 DeltaSFO : PanAm747.... Your sense of entitlement is quite disgusting, frankly. If you check Mom or Dad's employment contract, assuming it's a parent of yours th
28 PanAm747 : >>If you check Mom or Dad's employment contract, assuming it's a parent of yours that works for an airline,Sounds like you're a spoiled brat kid of so
29 Mirrodie : Adam84, I could not agree with you more. It's just too F%$#ing bad that a few bad non- rev travelers go and screw it up for everyone else. My aunt use
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