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British Women Dies On SQ Flight.  
User currently offlineHkgspotter1 From Hong Kong, joined Nov 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 2421 times:

DVT claims another life. Even the extra SQ legroom could not help her.

FROM THE BBC
============

British woman dies of clot on Singapore Airlines flight
---------------------------------------------------

A young British woman going home for Christmas died of a blood clot on a Singapore Airlines (SIA) flight to London last week, the airline said on Monday.
In one of the latest cases of "economy class syndrome", 28-year-old Alayne Wake collapsed near the end of the 14-hour journey from Singapore on December 19 when she got up to go to the toilet.

Despite the efforts of a doctor, nurse and paramedic who were fellow passengers, Wake from Sunderland in northern England never regained consciousness.

"She actually died on board," an SIA spokesman told Reuters. "Oxygen was administered and the aircraft defibrilation equipment and medical kit were used but she could not be revived."

The potentially fatal ailment, known as deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), is linked to a slowing of blood circulation in the legs while sitting for prolonged periods. Economy class syndrome is a misnomer as DVT can also affect business and first-class fliers.

Wake had been working in Singapore as a customer services manager for Paris-based smart card maker Oberthur Card Systems for 18 months after postings in France and Britain, a company spokesman told Reuters.

She flew frequently around Asia on business, he added.

Kevin Wake said his daughter was on her way home to spend the holidays with her family.

"I only hope that people will now realise that economy class syndrome hits not only old people," Singapore's Straits Times newspaper quoted him as saying. "Alayne was young and she was healthy."

The SIA spokesman said the airline alerted passengers to the dangers of DVT in various ways, including an in-flight video detailing simple exercises and periodic announcements from the crew to urge people to move around the cabin.

He could not say exactly how many incidents the carrier had seen but noted Wake's case was the first time someone had died of DVT while in the air.

Britain's Department of Health issued guidelines in November saying pregnant women and those taking birth control pills may be more at risk of developing DVT when travelling.

The guidelines encouraged passengers to drink plenty of water and exercise while seated during long flights to increase blood flow to the lower legs where clots are most likely.

The department said one in 2,000 people had DVT each year, although the figure falls to less than one in 3,000 among those under 40. It affects one in 500 of those over 80.




18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineILS From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 2335 times:

That's too bad.  Sad

User currently offlineCarmy From Singapore, joined Oct 2001, 627 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 2302 times:

Very unfortunate and surprising that she was just 28.  Sad

User currently offlineHkgspotter1 From Hong Kong, joined Nov 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2281 times:

Its both of the above and very, very sad. She was going home to spend the holidays with her family. I can only guess how happy they all felt. They would have been ready to go to the airport if not already at the airport before they knew the terrible news.

Big question:

What can we do about it ?


User currently offlineSingapore 777 From Australia, joined May 1999, 1014 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2261 times:

Even extra legroom on SQ could not help her? Excuse me...since when was there ever extra legroom on SQ? I believe most other airlines offer quite substantially more legroom than SQ especially on their B747-400s (which this unfortunate lady had the opportunity of flying to London) and on their A340-300s, both shockingly long-haul aircraft.

I hope this is a wake-up call to SQ to increase their cattle-like legroom in economy class to at least that in the B777s. Why should there even be double-standards anyway? Most of my relatives and friends who have flown on SQ have commented on how little legroom they cater for their economy class passengers.


User currently offlineVirginA340 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 15 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2256 times:

Isn't this the 3rd British female to die of this in 2 years? Maybe there is something about dvt being more prone on british females due to climate, exercising habits, change of habots considering that theese women we're frequent flyers (constant change of habits due to time zones have a shock on the system ie beditimes, eating periods, etc) or something else? I hope science can find the answer soon before this becomes a raging epidemic. My condolences to her family  Sad


"FUIMUS"
User currently offlineHkgspotter1 From Hong Kong, joined Nov 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2253 times:

I understood that SQ have more legroom then most carriers. I even saw a study of it in the South China Morning Post.

Must be wrong.


User currently offlineKaiTakFan From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 1588 posts, RR: 6
Reply 7, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2245 times:

Singapore 777... It seems you neglected the fact that DVT is not only a threat to economy travelers, but first and business class passengers as well. Its not only the leg room that is the problem in this situation. Obviously it is much more serious then just a bit more leg room. Even though I dont fly economy much over seas, I still walk the cabin at least 2 times and go stretch out while up for the bathroom. This should just be standard practice for all long hual passengers! I know im not the only one in Biz class walking about and stretching either. So the more people are aware of this the better! It really is a shame to hear this news at this time of the year as well!

User currently offlineCarmy From Singapore, joined Oct 2001, 627 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2245 times:

I don't know if SQ has more legroom than other carriers, but what SQ offers is on par, if not better than what other carriers offer. And since the SCMP has done a study on it, I'm sure there should be some credibility that SQ does offer more legroom.

Let's consider this. SQ removes five rows of seats in economy class so that everyone has more legroom. Sounds good for the passenger, but what happens to the income derived from the five row of seats then? It means that the rest of the economy class passengers will have to pay more for this extra legroom, to compensate for the loss of income from these five row of seats. The question then comes, are passengers willing to pay more than they already do? The answer is obviously no.

In any case, DVT does not exclusively hit economy class passengers. If you guys remember, DVT has hit passengers flying on Business and First Class as well. In fact, I remember reading in a Singaporean tabloid, The New Paper, a few months back that DVT hits people even when they're playing mahjong (an Asian game) or whilst taking a train for long hours. It's extrememly sad and unfortunate that this inccident happened, and let's just hope that more people are educated on how to prevent DVT from happening to them.


User currently offlineSingapore 777 From Australia, joined May 1999, 1014 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2228 times:

Ok...I agree with you on that, Carmy. And I firmly believe that if they had been following the Healthy Air Travel video at the beginning of the flight, they probably would not have contracted DVT. I do not know how to explain to you regarding how income can be derived back from that one row of passengers but I guess that since those airlines that do offer that extra legspace in economy class are now not doing well (well comparatively to SIA), I guess you are right in a sense.

An SIA stewardess told me not too long ago that DVT would probably not affect us youngsters and that it affects the elderly more. So there's a misconception that "only" certain groups of people are vulnerable to this. I think this tells us that everybody, no matter where you sit on the aircraft, is equally vulnerable to DVT. Let's just hope that people learn from this lesson.

My condolences to the lady's family and friends.


User currently offlineMarara From Australia, joined Oct 2001, 678 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2222 times:

According to SKYTRAX / Airline Quality.com
SIA has a pitch of 32" in Y class
Other airlines are just as bad or worse

Air Zimbabwe 30"
Austrian Airlines 31"
British Airways 31"
Lauda Air 31"
Northwest Airlines 31"
Qantas Airways 31"
Sabena  Sad 31"
Virgin Atlantic 31"

The best was American with 35", there were 14 airlines that had a seat pitch of 34" these were quite large airlines eg. AirNZ, Varig, Thai South African, Saudi, ANA. If these airlines are able to provide 34" pitch without charging a arm and a leg i dont see why SIA and more so the 31" mob above cant increase their pitch just a bit

 Big thumbs up

Althought "Dimensions represent typical seat pitch offered by an airline on international flights - this may not be available on all of an airline's fleet of aircraft"

http://www.airlinequality.com/Product/seat_intro.htm



I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours. Jerome K Jerome
User currently offlineAndreas From Germany, joined Oct 2001, 6104 posts, RR: 31
Reply 11, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2212 times:

as one of you has already pointed out, it happens to people playing a game on a train, too. That should tell you something about one of the basic reasons for DVT:

-Sitting for quite some time in a very unnatural cramped way, like hunched over a game-board, in an unhealthy surrounding like the cabin of an aircraft (extremely dry air, less than 3% humidity), which accelerates blood-clotting.

-Most people on long-haul services don't drink enough, except maybe alcohol, which is the only drink that does not help.

-Most people try to sleep or look movies, i.e. they try NOT to stand up once every hour.

-legroom is helpful in many ways but it has nothing or very little to do with the problem we are talking about.

And this has nothing to do with age. Of course older folks are more endangered, but it would be highly ignorant to tell younger folks that it couldn't happen to them...as we have just seen again, sadly!

Regards and Merry Christmas
Andreas

btw. Funny that one of you mentioned it: I, too seem to recall only news reports about younger British females dying from DVT. This is probably not scientific but worth thinking about!



I know it's only VfB but I like it!
User currently offlineMarara From Australia, joined Oct 2001, 678 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2203 times:

Well walking doesnt always help either. Remember the QF Flight Attendant. But everyone is at risk wether they are in the air or on the ground, at school we are warned about DVT, in our computing & design classes we are made to get up and walk down to the drink fountains


I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours. Jerome K Jerome
User currently offlineAndreas From Germany, joined Oct 2001, 6104 posts, RR: 31
Reply 13, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2200 times:

...as usual. But most folks don't even do one thing to prevent DVT. It's rather astonishing that so few people die from DVT. btw there is a study going on at LH medical department about this phenomenon. Unfortunately I haven't heard about results and I probably never will. I don't think any airline will publish negative results (and they will be negative!!!), which is something I don't understand: Quite obviously the problem is not the product a certain airline is offering, but rather the fact, that travelling under such circumstances can be hazardous to your health.
Regards
Andreas



I know it's only VfB but I like it!
User currently offlineSingapore_Air From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2000, 13739 posts, RR: 19
Reply 14, posted (12 years 8 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2164 times:

My condolences to the poor businesswoman.

It is obviously not Singapore Airlines Limited's fault and the poor woman obviously took precautions. She was fit, did movements, presumably took asprin (which apparently thins the blood, reducing risk of clots), and moved around the aircraft. Hence, why she died on the aircraft as she moved around a lot. Therefore, it baffles me as to why she got DVT.

The lesson everyone can learn from this incident and many others around the world is that we need studies into how DVT works. SIA is an airline currently participating in a study of Deep Vein Thrombosis in the United Kingdom.

Condolences to the lady who died.

----Straits Times, Singapore----

Woman on SIA flight dies from blood clot
After 13 hours on board, Briton flying from Singapore to London collapses and dies without regaining consciousness

By Alfred Lee
STRAITS TIMES EUROPE BUREAU

LONDON - A young British businesswoman who has lived and worked in Singapore for 18 months has died from deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) on a flight home for Christmas aboard a Singapore Airlines jumbo.

A doctor, a nurse and a paramedic made a dramatic, desperate 20-minute attempt to save the woman's life.

Advertisement


Helped by cabin staff of the jet, they continued their efforts as the plane came in to land at London's Heathrow airport, but to no avail.

Miss Alayne Wake, 28, was a passenger in the economy section of the Boeing 747-400 airliner. About 13 hours after taking off from Changi, when the jumbo was just 193 km from London, she got up to go to the toilet.

It is believed that a clot which had developed in the calf of her right leg while she was sitting, moved, possibly towards the lung or heart - and she collapsed.

Medics rushed to her aid, but she died without regaining consciousness, at 4.15 am on Thursday.

A report being prepared for the coroner lists DVT, also known as economy-class syndrome, as the cause of death.

The thrombosis is linked to long periods of sitting still on long-haul flights and although most victims have been passengers in economy class where seats have less leg room, people in business and even first-class cabins have also suffered from DVT.

Miss Wake moved to Singapore last year after landing a job as Asia-Pacific region custom-services manager for Oberthur Card Systems, which makes credit and telephone cards.

Her family lives in Sunderland in the north of England and her father, Mr Kevin Wake, 57, was waiting at the airport there to meet a shuttle flight from Heathrow.

Mr Wake, a former commercial manager for Sunderland Enterprise Council, said: 'Alayne was a very intelligent, happy girl and she loved the excitement and buzz of living and working in Singapore.

'She was coming back to spend Christmas with her younger sister, brother-in-law, grandmother and myself.

'The irony is that I bought the medical stockings to prevent DVT when I went out to Singapore to visit Alayne earlier this year.

'I asked her to wear them also. If only she had listened to me, this tragedy...would not have happened.

'I only hope that people will now realise that economy-class syndrome hits not only old people. Alayne was young and she was healthy.'

----
----Straits Times, Singapore----

SIA study on air scourge

LONDON - Singapore Airlines is involved in research into deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) that affects passengers on long-haul flights and warns them regularly about the problem, the airline said here.

Commenting on the death of a passenger aboard an SIA flight, spokesman Gerry Stevens said: 'Alayne Wake was a very frequent flyer with us. She was a very young lady and presumably very fit.

'Like a lot of airlines, we are involved in research to look into the problems of DVT in detail ... We do warn about DVT in literature kept in seat pockets, on our in-flight videos and through verbal advice from the crew.'
----



Anyone can fly, only the best Soar.
User currently offlineHkgspotter1 From Hong Kong, joined Nov 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (12 years 8 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2104 times:

I was waiting for this line from him.

"It is obviously not Singapore Airlines Limited's fault.."



User currently offlineMas777 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 1999, 2935 posts, RR: 6
Reply 16, posted (12 years 8 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2093 times:

Once again - this subject has appeared on this forum. I have commented on this before and am again worried by the comments made here.

DVTs occur whether or not anyone is flying. It can happen in a hospital bed and it is not uncommon to have prophylaxis medication against DVTs whilst an in-patient - either with TED-stockings or sub-cutaneous injections or in the case of higher risk patients - both.

Immobility is the greatest factor whilst other factors increasing the risks of DVTs include smoking, age and certain contraceptive pills.

I am concerned by the comments of self-prescribed aspirin for flights and it was experience in my local Accidents & Emergency department which raises this concern - where a man was admitted with a massive haemorrhage after a series of flights to Dubai (for business) for which he self-prescribed aspirin for fear of DVTs - which had hit the headlines at the time.

If anyone is travelling and is worried about the risks of DVTs (and more specifically Pulmonary Embolisms (PEs)) - they should consult their doctor with regards to helping to prevent them.

In my opinion, neither the size, width or pitch of a seat has any bearing on additional risks although any increase in 'personal' space may give the passenger more freedom of movement - which is the important thing to remember.


User currently offlineSingapore_Air From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2000, 13739 posts, RR: 19
Reply 17, posted (12 years 8 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 2068 times:

I was waiting for your immaturity after your maturity in starting the post my dear.


Anyone can fly, only the best Soar.
User currently offlineCarmy From Singapore, joined Oct 2001, 627 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (12 years 8 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 2065 times:

Hkgspotter1: Singapore_Air may not say it, but I'm going to say it. I didn't think anyone would mention this, but since you did, I'll bring it up. This inccident was not SIA's fault. It wasn't anyone's fault. It was an unfortunate inccident, and it could have happened on any airline. And it happened that this time round, it happened on SIA.

Like I mentioned in an earlier post, and Mas777 has just mentioned, DVT can happen anywhere, so as long as the person is not moving. It has absolutely nothing to do with the airline. If my memory serves me right, there was actually an inccident where a woman actually died from DVT even though she was on First Class. It is, again, not the fault of the airline or anyone else.


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