Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Lufthansa And Other European Airlines Origins  
User currently offlineElchanan From Norway, joined Sep 2001, 60 posts, RR: 0
Posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1901 times:

Deutsche Lufthansa was the result of a merger of Deutsche Aero Lloyd and Junkers Luftverkehr in 1926. Was it a private company or state-owned?
Has Air France been state-owned since 1933?
Were ANY of the European national carriers privately or partially privately owned from the beginning? Anyone?
Elchanan


13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAvion From Bouvet Island, joined May 1999, 2205 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1834 times:

Swissair was privately owned

User currently offlineAirsicknessbag From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 4723 posts, RR: 33
Reply 2, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1829 times:


RE: Luft Hansa

Both Aero Lloyd and Junkers were private owned. However, they, together with lots of other competitors, entered into a ruinous competition in the early 20s, largely financed by state subsidies. The merger was forced upon them by the government in order to stop that burning of taxpayer money.

Daniel Smile


User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1812 times:

British Airways can trace it's origins to a private company which was the first ever to carry a fare paying passenger on any international flight.

The company name was Aircraft Transport and Travel, or better known as AT&T. The first flight was on 15 July 1919. The passenger was Colonel W N Pilikington of the UK St Helens glass company. The pilot was Captain Gerry Shaw, chief pilot of AT&T, flying a DH9. The journey was from Hendon (NW London) to Paris (Le Bourget). STD 0700 ATD 0730 ATA 1015 (2.75 hours).



Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineBBADXB From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1811 times:

...& I thought that KLM Royal Dutch is the oldest airline still flying today!

User currently offlineElchanan From Norway, joined Sep 2001, 60 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1803 times:

KLM is the oldest airline still flying, but not if you trace the origins of other existing airlines. An example is SAS which was founded as late as 1946. It was however a result of a merger between DNL of Norway, ABA and SLA of Sweden and DDL of Denmark. DDL was founded in 1918... It's still not SAS.

Anyway - when DID the private flag carriers become state-owned - if ever? Swissair? Imperial Airways or BOAC? Lufthansa? +++
And what does it mean that Aer Lingus was initiated as a private company by the Irish state in 1936?
I'm looking for a pattern in European airline ownership. BA and Air France are examples of airlines privatised in the 1990s....when did they become state-owned however???


User currently offlineBBADXB From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1798 times:

AFAIK, Air Malta too was initiated by the State in 1974 and to some extent it was set up as a private company, in that it is run independently and has never received subsidies. Of course, it is one of the smallest carriers in Europe, but for such a small country, it is some kind of achievement... I think so at least when I take a glance at the route network of KM/AMC.

rgds,
BBADXB  Wink/being sarcastic


User currently offlineBBADXB From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 1794 times:


Air Malta remains largely state owned, although there were strong rumours of privatisation in the recent past. Personally, I'd love to see KM joining oneworld, though it is quite unlikely... I mean who cares about such a small (insignificant?) airline?

AMC also has a 49% stake in Azzura (based in Bergamo), which is some sort of franchise of Alitalia (which owns the remaing 51%).


User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 8, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 1781 times:

At one time in 1921, British airlines temporarily closed their services, as British aerodrome facilities paid for by the British taxpayer, were being used solely by foreign airlines, themselves being subsidised again by their own governments!
Imperial Airways was formed on 1 April 1924 out of Handley Page Transport, The Instone Airline, Daimler Airway (from AT&T), and British Marine Air Navigation.
It was a nationalised company set up as the individual companies could not financilly compete with the new state heavily susidised airlines of France, Holland and Belgium.
In 1936, the original British Airways was formed by the government operating a different route structure to Imperial. Both of them were merged into BOAC in 1939, and formal operations in that name started on 1 April 1940.
BOAC operated passenger services throughout WW2 to Africa, the Middle and Far East, on to Australia, flying via neutral Lisbon, together with many support flights for the Royal Air Force, including the extremely dangerous flights on the 'ball-bearing runs' to Sweden, assisted by unarmed Mosquito fighter-bombers as part of the BOAC strength. In wartime 1941, regular tranatlantic services were started by BOAC using three Boeing 314 flying boats. At the end of the war, 83 of it's comrades had died on flying duties, aircraft had carried 280,000 passengers on government service, together with nearly 50 million pounds of cargo and mail. The BA aircraft had flown 57 million miles on a route network that at war end spanned 54,000 miles.
In 1946, BOAC had two offspring, the first being British European Airways, and the other being British South American Airways. After the war, BOAC's most modern arcraft were operating on the Atlantic, and interestingly, on 1 July 1946, BA started Constellation 049 services between Heathrow and New York (La Guardia)!
The rest is history, BEA and BOAC were merged in the early 70's into British Airways in 1974, and BA was privatised in 1987.



Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineDELL_dude From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 1763 times:

TWA helped start several world airlines, including Air India and Lufthansa?

It seems most people either forget or do not know that.

DELL_dude


User currently offlinePatroni From Luxembourg, joined Aug 1999, 1403 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1737 times:

Hi,

>>TWA helped start several world airlines, including Air India and Lufthansa?
It seems most people either forget or do not know that.<<

Well, yes, TWA definitely helped Lufthansa to get on its feet again after being resurrected in 1955, but of course this was not a "present" from TWA. In fact, the TWA captains who comandeered the Lockheed Super Constellations (supervising a crew of Germans who had not been allowed to fly for the past 10 years) earned quite a lot of money from LH and had a life like a king in postwar Germany for a couple of years until German captains were certified to fly the Conny themself.

Best regards,

Tom




User currently offlineElchanan From Norway, joined Sep 2001, 60 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1718 times:

Thank you all for your input - especially Carduelis - good one on Imperial Airways.
Found a good site on airlines and their history:

http://aerotransport.free.fr/


User currently offlineGRZ-AIR From Austria, joined Apr 2001, 574 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1714 times:



Also I guess that the name LUFTHANSA
has something to do with the so called HANSESTAEDTE in Germany ?



When I joined A.net it was still free, haha ;).
User currently offlineElchanan From Norway, joined Sep 2001, 60 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1711 times:

GRZ-AIR
The name "Hansa" probably refers to the hanseatic cities of Germany, yes. The Hanseatic League with it's headquarter in Lübeck was an important trade organization especially for the north. Hanseatic cities were established along the Baltic Sea and the Norwegian coast. The Hanseatic League is however a phenomenon of the late Middle Ages and early modern times. Interestingly enough, Luft Hansa showed an early interest in opening routes to the Baltic and the Nordic states. I doubt however that there is any link other than by association - much the same way as many Scandinavian products or companies often use the name "Viking".


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Imperial Air And Other Charter Airlines posted Tue Jun 22 1999 04:00:16 by Tol air
European Airlines And Central America posted Thu Apr 27 2006 20:05:58 by Carmenlu15
Japan Asia Airlines And Other Carriers posted Thu Mar 9 2006 23:19:28 by CRJ'sRule
Sun Country Airlines Food And Other Questions posted Mon Feb 13 2006 07:42:01 by TWA902fly
Qatar And Other Five Star Airlines posted Wed Mar 30 2005 23:40:25 by Braybuddy
Lufthansa And Aegean Airlines Partnership posted Tue Mar 29 2005 22:15:53 by Mika10021
Would EK And Other Similar GCC Airlines Survive? posted Sat Feb 26 2005 02:55:02 by B727fan
European Airlines and Gas Prices. posted Tue Feb 22 2005 22:47:47 by 174thfwff
Chicago Cubs-What airlines do they and other teams use? posted Sun Sep 28 2003 22:32:37 by Ual777contrail
Frank Lorenzo And Other CEO's At Eastern Airlines? posted Tue Jul 16 2002 21:30:03 by A388