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Extremly Dangerous Airports  
User currently offlinePlanespotterx From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 4719 times:

hi does anyone know of any extremely dangerous/hazardous airports in the world (Eg Kathmandu or Catalunya) any references would be useful indeed, also if you know what kind of aircraft are able to use these airfields

37 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineB737-700 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 4577 times:


Innsbruck and Funchal are said to be pretty challenging, too.


User currently offlineLt-AWACS From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4538 times:

well I did not feel 100% safe last time I flew into Bogota in the mid 90's I do not know if the airport has better security now. Most large planes use the airport.

I fly quite regularly around Belize and many of it's small dirt strip airports are interesting, like Dangriga and Corozal. There is no security at these little sites just a strip and a small building for one worker and some benches. The strip goes right to the edge of the Caribean at Dangriga. ONly islanders and cessna's use these. I've gotgreat picks of the 'Terminal' shack at Dangriga and of Cessna crash in the Mountains near the Jungle preserve.

IN Afirca I flew from Banjul to some strip in Senegal that seemed 'shady' but the oil companies pay for security so it wasn't a problem. I don't know if I'd go back with that security.

Hook 'em Horns,
Tony aka Lt-AWACS


User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4488 times:

I visited Funchal many times in the early 80s when I was Area Controller Hotel and Ground contracts for BA Holidays. It was always an 'exciting' experience!
In those days the runway was not long enough to get to UK, so most a/c took a short hop to nearby Porto Santo (a NATO base) to take more fuel for the far longer runway, or came up via FAO in S Portugal.
Notice the extension is on stilts on reclaimed land!

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Pedro Becken




Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineFunny From Greece, joined May 2001, 333 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4462 times:

Quito is also quite challanging.
In the middle of the Andes Mountains,

Jase


User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4458 times:

Looking at the picture, it reminded me of the nasty downdraft from the steep hills in the background - on occasions there were some very nasty crosswinds.
BTW - the other end of the runway also looks straight over the sea!



Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineFritzi From United Arab Emirates, joined Jun 2001, 2762 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4444 times:

Check this website out:

http://www.dangerous-airports.com

fritzi



User currently offlineLindy field From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 3131 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4422 times:
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Tegucigalpa is considered very dangerous.
Some of the obstructions in the landing path, like the hill, have since been removed. Note the mountain at the other end of the runway.

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © William L.B.J. Dekker



Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © William L.B.J. Dekker



Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Scott Stache



Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © William L.B.J. Dekker



User currently offlineBaliMorris From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 140 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4402 times:

I remember watching a Lonely Planet travel program on Laos, where Ian Wright looked pretty nervous on a domestic flight. Apparently the Americans had bombed poor Laos beyond belief some years ago and about a third of the bombs they dropped did not explode. These unexploded bombs, for some bizarre reason, are a favourite souvenir of some tourists to the region, including many of the passengers on his flight. Needless to say, security is just about non-existent. I'd imagine there are a number of countries apart from Laos that suffer from the same lack of airport security.

Also, I've seen signs posted at security checkpoints at Houston Intercontinental that single out Lagos, Nigeria as having particularly poor security.


User currently offlineBaliMorris From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 140 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 4399 times:

Ah! You meant airports that are dangerous for reasons other than security, did you? Don't know if it's true or not, but I think someone mentioned that Islamabad, Pakistan was a bit of a tricky one due to it's proximity to mountains.

User currently offlineCabal From Colombia, joined Sep 2001, 58 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 4301 times:

I've flown to Quito (jumpseater) and is very tricky landing you pass the VOR southbound and then turn 180 degress to the north and in between the valley, there's your runway which by the way is short and half uphill and half downhill and so by the time of your touchdown you are only seeing half of the runway and thinking 'Was coming to Quito a good idea ??' full brakes and full reversers and well you made it....this time....

User currently offline737-8K5 From Germany, joined Oct 2001, 25 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 4283 times:

yeah, yeah

funchal is really a "heavy" one.
I had the luck to have a jumpseat landing there, with a Hapag-Lloyd A 310. Unbelievable, this approach!
But nowadays, they have a runway of almost 2800m, but before they extended it, it was only 1800m. At that time Hapag was the only airline to land there with a widebody airliner, its A 310. And only a handfull of pilots were allowed to land there, they needed (and still need) special training for that airport.



User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11154 posts, RR: 59
Reply 12, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 4252 times:

Aspen, Colorado is an extremely dangerous airport. I'm sure you all heard about the Gulfstream crash in Aspen a while ago.

Aspen (ASE) has a glide slope of 5 degrees.

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Søren Geertsen



Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Søren Geertsen



Regards



"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
User currently offlineKlwright69 From Saudi Arabia, joined Jan 2000, 2097 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 4209 times:

I have flown into TGU, UIO, and BOG... The landing at TGU is quite an experience! Unreal! I remember that hill, people standing on it can just about strike the plane with rocks it is so close! There are no runway lights. Landings are only allowed during daylight, clear weather hours.

User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16365 posts, RR: 56
Reply 14, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 4197 times:

Tenerife Norte......where the 2 747's collided. Heavy fog common.




Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineSoku39 From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 1797 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 4179 times:

Just because they crashed in heavey pea soup doesn't make the airport dangerous. Any airport in fog is a dangerous airport.


The Ohio Player
User currently offlineIMissPiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6340 posts, RR: 33
Reply 16, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 4149 times:

I notice that the airports listed above, although tricky, have very good safety records in general. LAX is considered one of the most dangerous in the world by pilots but, it too has an excellent safety record.


Damn, this website is getting worse daily.
User currently offlineAccidentally From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 643 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 4135 times:
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Eagle/Vail CO is quite tricky  Smile


Cory Crabtree - crab453 - Indianapolis - 2R2 - 1966 PA-32-260
User currently offlineYyz717 From Canada, joined Sep 2001, 16365 posts, RR: 56
Reply 18, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 4131 times:

Tenerife Norte is VERY susceptible to fog, so much so that pax flights were being diverted so regularly to Tenerife South that all pax flights to TN were stopped for several years. Also, the main runway has no taxiway....so depending on prevailing winds, a/c must taxi along the active runway....which was a contributing factor in the collision.




Panam, TWA, Ansett, Eastern.......AC next? Might be good for Canada.
User currently offlineTwr75 From Australia, joined Mar 2001, 111 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 4096 times:

There was an airport I flew into a while ago with FS2K that looked interesting. The airport code is SPZA, I think it's called Nazca or something similar, but I don't remember exactly.


Like a seagull on the MCG of life...
User currently offlineAirFranceJFK From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 480 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 4099 times:

I would definately consider Cheddi Jagan International Airport in Georgetown, Guyana to be one of the worlds most dangerous. The field, which lies atop a cliff, surrounded by dense Amazon jungle on all sides, can accomodate a B757/767 at most. Although BWIA West Indies Airways flew the L-1011 Tri-Star for a few years, it was only granted approval after the airline agreed to strictly monitor aircraft weight. Tower Air tried unsucessfully a few years ago to operate a B747 on the JFK-Georgetown route and was denied, as was Leisure Air, when they requested to operate the same route using a DC-10.

At present, the largest visitiors are Universal Airlines' B767 and North American Airlines B757/737 from New York, followed by BWIA's B737/MD83. I flew into the airport 2 years ago with Guyana Air 2000's B757 (dissolved April 2001). Although the take off was quite smooth, the landing is something to remember. It was definately one of the hardest I can remember, and I've never felt reverse thrusters applied as hard as I did that day. I think it was the first time I realized how useful seatbelts really are, seeing as I nearly fell out of my seat.

As if that wasn't dangerous enough for your taste, the airport only has emergency certification for an aircraft the size of a Dash 8. In other words, should your B757 encounter a fire or other emergency on landing, you'd really be out of luck, seeing as they only have enough crash/rescue/fire equipment to cover a Turbo Prop. Definately not for the light of heart.


User currently offlineT prop From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1029 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 4058 times:

I heard the trip to Paro is a white knuckle event.
cut and pasted the info below from Druk Air's website:


Nestling in the Himalayas, between Tibet and India’s Assam Plain, the kingdom of Bhutan offers a variety of climates, from the hot and humid jungles of the southern foothills to frigid snow-capped peaks in the north, which rise to 7,700 metres.

This country of 600,000 people is the last surviving Mahayana Buddhist state which has shaped the nation’s history, and it plays a vital role in everyday life. Bhutan is renowned for its undiluted culture and unspoiled natural wonders. Bhutan’s past is still it's present, its religion still a way of life. The last Shangrila.

Druk Air, the National Flag carrier of the Kingdom of Bhutan was established by a Royal Proclamation on the 05th of April, 1981. January 14th 1983 began the commencement of Druk Air’s operation when the German manufactured 18 seater Dornier 228-200 touched down at Paro airport bearing the Royal Flag of the Kingdom of Bhutan. On the Dornier, Druk Air operated to Calcutta in India and Dhaka in Bangladesh.

Paro is the only airport in Bhutan which is located in a deep valley at an elevation of 7300 ft above sea level. The surrounding hills are high as 16,000 ft and approach into Paro airport is entirely by visual flight rules. Due to the difficult operating conditions, operations with the Dornier 228 caused many delays and diversions. With the growth of traffic and the expansion of flights the need for a larger aircraft became necessary. After conducting numerous tests taking into account the difficult operating conditions the British Aerospace BAe 146-100 was selected and started operations in November 1988. Within a short span of its introduction the network of Druk Air increased to link Paro with New-Delhi, Bangkok and Kathmandu. From two destinations in 1983 today Druk Air operates from Paro four times a week to Bangkok and Calcutta, twicw to Kathmandu and Delhi and once a week to Dhaka and Yangon.

Maybe the smallest national carrier in the world, Druk-Air has a fleet of two BAe-146 aircraft. An international flight crew and hostesses trained by Thai Airways International give the airline its credibility and charm.

Druk-Air is the only airline that serves Paro. So all visitors to Bhutan are initiated into the kingdom in its care. The flight into Paro is one of the most spectacular in the world. Whether flying along the Himalayan range from Kathmandu or over the foothills from Calcutta or Dhaka, each flight is mesmerising aeronautical feat and offers an exciting descent into the kingdom.

http://www.drukair.com.bt/about.htm

Sounds like fun!

T prop.


User currently offlineNighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5182 posts, RR: 33
Reply 22, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3994 times:

I remember seeing a documentary on druk air once on tv, and the approach to that airport is pretty spectacular! The country itself is very spectacular too, despite having virtually no connections to the outside world, the airline is currently training up a few citizens to run the airline. The eventual aim is to have the airline entirely run by the countries citizens. An amazing feat when you consider there isnt a single TV in the country, or a car.

The doc also mentioned that they were planning to build a second air strip in a different half of the country, to accomodate more flights and to use as a backup incase the primary was unusable due to weather. Anyone else know any more?



That'll teach you
User currently offlineRayChuang From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 8034 posts, RR: 5
Reply 23, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 3966 times:

I'm surprised no one has mentioned San Diego, CA's Lindbergh Field (SAN).

Between that six-story parking structure at the south end of the runway and the hills beyond the north end of the runway, I'm surprised there hasn't been a rash of accidents there in the last 40 years. They need to remove that parking structure before a plane plows into it during landing approach and causes a horrible tragedy.


User currently offlineBen88 From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 1093 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (12 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 3915 times:

Well in the U.S. it would probably be LAX. The airport is poorly designed and that has led to it being the leader in runway incursions and near misses in the United States. You should see the Jan 2002 runway incursion report...scary. Mix in the fact that half of the intl. pilots don't speak English properly and you have planes in the middle of a runway after they are asked to hold short.

25 FLYSAB : Bilbao (Spain) can be challenging too. The airport lies in a valley, and turbulences can be quite heavy with high winds. There have been a few crashes
26 Iainhol : I do not see what is dangerous about LAX. All you have to do is pay attention to what you are doing. Iain
27 Post contains links and images Jwenting : http://www.dangerous-airports.com Browse and tremble
28 Post contains links FATFlyer : The International Federation of Air Line Pilots' Associations produced the following list in 1998 of what they called 'black star" airports. San Franc
29 Aking8488 : In my personal experience, the only airport I have felt very uncomfortable was Jakarta, Indonesia. The customs people were crooked--wanting to be paid
30 Skippy777 : Sint Maarten is also hard to land. See, Beach, Fench and Landing strip. Nice when KLM and Air France come in with the 747-300. Break , Break , Break
31 VirginA340 : LGA for short runways and obsticles like buildings and street signs. DCA because of the zig zag like patterns to dodge restricted airspace ie White ho
32 Post contains images Vfw614 : How about London City - the 1199x30m runway resembles an aircraft carrier as it is a former dock in the old harbour area. Glide path is 5.5 and to the
33 Mighluss : Planespotterx: You mention Catalunya as a dangerous airport ( I guess you are refering to Girona's airport, Catalunya-Costa Brava) Why?? Mountains? Ab
34 Aussie_ : Cuzco peru is an "interesting" landing
35 Post contains links and images L-188 : Click for large versionPhoto © Dan Gasper Would you belive those mountains are closer when you look at them from the other side? Alaska Airlines
36 Paulc : Samos in the Greek islands is well known for its difficult approach and short runway. 757 is the biggest thing that can use it and that is bad enough.
37 Saab2000 : I fly for Crossair on the Saab 2000. Being based in Lugano is interesting. The IGS approach is 6.65°. Bern is only a 4° glide slope but it has a sho
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